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Road tubeless tyres, where and how much?

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  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    If not IRC then try Mavic yskion UST. I actually like the yskion. Its much like the IRC Roadlite although it wears a bit faster. The only thing for me is the IRC tyres are a bit cheaper to me than Mavic will sell me the yskion for.

    Hutchinson make Mavic and the pirelli tyres. IRC also make tyres for other companies. So you know which manufacturers to look at for tubeless tyres.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    Hutchinson do a 240g tubeless tyres the fusion 5 galatik 11 storm. That is quick but not very long lived.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • sampras38sampras38 Posts: 1,917
    timothyw wrote:
    Er, Malcolm Borg is the poster immediately above you, posts as 'thecycleclinic'.... that's his shop.

    Yep, just realised, :lol:
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,160
    Hutchinson do a 240g tubeless tyres the fusion 5 galatik 11 storm. That is quick but not very long lived.


    My 28c Performance versions came in at 281 & 284g. A censored to fit and had to add a new strip (2 in total) of rim tape.

    Gone with 90PSI in the back and 85 in the front. Testing them tomorrow and will report back.
    '17 Focus Mares Force 1 --- '19 Cervélo S5 Disc Di2

    IG: RhinosWorkshop - Check it out for all my custom builds...
  • dodgydodgy Posts: 2,890
    Anyone know which sealant is less vulnerable to being affected by CO2? I only use tubeless on my road bike.
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,160
    Best I've used for higher PSI tyres (road not MTB), is Orange Seal Endurance.
    '17 Focus Mares Force 1 --- '19 Cervélo S5 Disc Di2

    IG: RhinosWorkshop - Check it out for all my custom builds...
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    Many claim this. Effetto, MaXSeal, Joe's and Orange all claim this but if you do use CO2 then inject more sealant to be sure. It has a drying effect regardless.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • tincamantincaman Posts: 505
    dodgy wrote:
    Anyone know which sealant is less vulnerable to being affected by CO2? I only use tubeless on my road bike.
    OKO HI-Fibre Magic Milk is claimed to be CO2 friendly, and is £9.99 a litre at PX
  • drlodgedrlodge Posts: 4,824
    Sealant doesn't like CO2, period. Its more due to the high pressure its injected with rather than the CO2 itself I believe, similar would result if you used a high powered pressure pump.
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
    Find me on Strava
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,056
    I'm using Lifeline sealant right now and have used it with CO2 in the past.
    Yesterday when I rode to my LBS I discovered sealant on my rear wheel and discovered that it had sealed a puncture.
    The tyre was still at 60psi so perfectly rideable. I pumped it back up to 80psi and had no further issues with it.

    After yesterday I'm positively evangelical about road tubeless!
  • arseyarsey Posts: 171
    Looking at some winter tyre and want to stick with IRC. Am I right in thinking the only real option is the formula pro x-guard? It doesn't seem like the Roadlite x-guard comes in tubeless.

    Any experience of 25 vs 28? Tempted to go for the 28.
    Canyon Ultimate CF Disc
    Vitus Energie Disc
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,374
    It's a bit patient zero but the Pirelli Cinturo?

    I like the summer (tubed) versions
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    The 28mm X guard is predictably a bit more compfortable than the 25mm. Also predictidly it is a bit heavier. Not sure there is more to say.

    I have asked IRC to do a roadlite X guard tubeless tyre.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 1,029
    These are very good for winter and £34 a pop is a decent price ...
    Hutchinson Fusion 5 All Season 11Storm TLR
  • arseyarsey Posts: 171
    bobones wrote:
    These are very good for winter and £34 a pop is a decent price ...
    Hutchinson Fusion 5 All Season 11Storm TLR
    Had terrible experiences with Fusion 5's so have gone for the IRC formula pro x guards
    Canyon Ultimate CF Disc
    Vitus Energie Disc
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 1,029
    arsey wrote:
    bobones wrote:
    These are very good for winter and £34 a pop is a decent price ...
    Hutchinson Fusion 5 All Season 11Storm TLR
    Had terrible experiences with Fusion 5's so have gone for the IRC formula pro x guards
    Like what? The new Tubless Ready (as opposed to the heavier Tubeless) versions have been very reliable for me.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,374
    Mine seemed to get cut standing still...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 1,029
    The All Seasons don’t cut at all IME.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    That tyre is similar to the Mavic yskion UST and that cuts very nicely.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 1,029
    That tyre is similar to the Mavic yskion UST and that cuts very nicely.
    I think the Fusion 5 Performance is similar, not the All Seasons. Also, Hutchinson have been changing the compound used in these tyres relatively frequently so the Fusion 5 of 2 or 3 years ago is a different tyre. In any case, discounting size, there are probably 12 different kinds of Fusion 5 tyres in current circulation in permutations of (Tubeless or Tubeless Ready casing) x (11storm or HDE compound) x (Galactik or Performance or All Seasons model).
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    Yes, the Tubeless ones have Kevlar Pro Tech reinforcement (except Galactik) and are heavier, which makes me think they have more puncture protection compared to Tubeless Ready which have Hardskin reinforcement.
    Difference is with the Tubeless models you can't use a tube afaik. Jarno from http://bicyclerollingresistance.com/ has the 11storm on the list for testing.

    Galactik's TR lasted about 3000km for me (although could get about 4000 if I hadn't damaged the tire by locking the wheels once) from spring to summer on clean roads, but they cut easily. Now testing the Performance TR ones but would also like to try the Galactik's in Tubeless.
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    The difference is that Tubeless can be run without sealant - tubeless ready require sealant otherwise they will lose air quickly.

    You can run a tube in either, should you want/need to.

    And yes, there are a lot of versions of the Hutchinson tyres out there so you do need to be careful of drawing conclusions.

    I'm almost tempted by the Hutch all seasons from merlin, £34 -10% is about as good as I've seen for tubeless for a while - but I'm reluctant to spend more than £25 a tyre. One bad sidewall cut on any tyre and the money might as well go in the bin.

    And this doesn't necessarily mean getting bad tyres - so long as you don't mind buying last years model, or running a 23 instead of a 25, there are plenty of bargains to be had.
  • drlodgedrlodge Posts: 4,824
    Why would you ever want to run a tubeless tyre without sealant? If it punctures, it won't seal.
    WyndyMilla Massive Attack | Rourke 953 | Condor Italia 531 Pro | Boardman CX Pro | DT Swiss RR440 Tubeless Wheels
    Find me on Strava
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    drlodge wrote:
    Why would you ever want to run a tubeless tyre without sealant? If it punctures, it won't seal.
    Well, you do it on your car.

    You are protected from snakebites and inner tube blowouts. You can always add sealant if you get a puncture.

    But yeah, putting a bit of sealant in usually makes sense.
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    timothyw wrote:
    The difference is that Tubeless can be run without sealant - tubeless ready require sealant otherwise they will lose air quickly.

    You can run a tube in either, should you want/need to.

    Weird then that Mavic chose the Tubeless Ready from Hutchinson for the Yksion Pro with UST system instead of the Tubeless one.
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    Not really. The tubeless ready is lighter (even after you add a hefty belt of sealant) and rolls better.

    Probably cheaper to make too.
  • bobonesbobones Posts: 1,029
    zefs wrote:
    Galactik's TR lasted about 3000km for me (although could get about 4000 if I hadn't damaged the tire by locking the wheels once) from spring to summer on clean roads, but they cut easily. Now testing the Performance TR ones but would also like to try the Galactik's in Tubeless.

    I didn't get on well with the Tubeless Performance (spate of non-sealing punctures), but the Tubeless Ready have been incident free over the summer. I don't think I got much more than 1500 mi or so out of the rear though. I also prefer the TR versions because they're a lot lighter, but the lack of butyl lining means they're harder to get a patch on the inside to stick.

    I've had the TLR All Seasons (HDE not 11storm) on my winter bike since last winter and they don't seem to pick up any cuts and ride pretty well. I picked these up from Acycles around this time last year for less than £20 a pair.

    This winter I'm sticking with Maxxis Padrones (another Black Friday bargain) until they wear out or can't cope then I'll go back to the All Seasons TLR.

    If you're looking for Galactik's then Acycles have the Tubeless HDE for £30 in 23mm but the newer 11storm versions are a lot dearer ...

    https://www.acycles.co.uk/road/tyres/ty ... 1/yes.html
  • skeetamskeetam Posts: 143
    Continental have finally arrived to the party. Quite an interesting read. Seems like they might be quite expensive at nearly 75 euros

    https://www.bikeradar.com/road/gear/article/continental-gp-5000-tl-specs-pricing-53229/
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    That could well be the move that takes tubeless mainstream then.

    Still quite a lot of sticker shock to overcome though!
  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 8,257
    skeetam wrote:
    Continental have finally arrived to the party. Quite an interesting read. Seems like they might be quite expensive at nearly 75 euros

    I should think they will sell for the same price as the schwalbe pro ones when they come on the market
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