The gert big music thread

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  • focuszing723
    focuszing723 Posts: 7,196
    edited June 2023
    I'd like to hear the different types of music created throughout the Universe and see if there are any similarities. Who/what would be seen as our best music/songs on an intergalactic level?
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,201

    I'd like to hear the different types of music created throughout the Universe and see if there are any similarities. Who/what would be seen as our best music/songs on an intergalactic level?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qORYO0atB6g
  • monkimark
    monkimark Posts: 1,500
    I did glastonbury 1998 to 2011 (I think).
    Fallow year in 2012 and then my first daughter was born in 2013 so never made it back.
    The only other festival I have been to was Leeds in 2006 and there is no comparison, Glastonbury is just a different class of thing.
    There is so much going on that I would be happy going even if I didn't like any of the main acts.

    Considering it one last time next year if I can get tickets. In 1998 I think i bought my ticket from Virgin Records a few weeks before we went!

    As this thread partially originated out of a Glastonbury discussion. Has anyone actually been? Unfortunately, as I cannot stand being in large crowds of people, Festivals in general aren't for me. Would be good to hear of other Forum members Glasto (or other music festival) experiences.

  • focuszing723
    focuszing723 Posts: 7,196

    I'd like to hear the different types of music created throughout the Universe and see if there are any similarities. Who/what would be seen as our best music/songs on an intergalactic level?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qORYO0atB6g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhqyZeUlE8U

    Bloody classic that.
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    I forgot I went to see the Kaiser Chiefs early this year. I’m not a fan but my cousin is the road manager and said anytime I wanted tickets to give him a call. So as they were on locally I did and they were pretty good. Supported by the Frattellis who were ok and the Sherlocks who weren’t.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,435

    I'd like to hear the different types of music created throughout the Universe and see if there are any similarities. Who/what would be seen as our best music/songs on an intergalactic level?

    Maybe we could have an intergalactic version of Eurovision. I doubt it would be any weirder.
  • Eurovision is already an intergalactic version of itself, surely? ;)
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,552
    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.
  • Jezyboy
    Jezyboy Posts: 2,894

    As this thread partially originated out of a Glastonbury discussion. Has anyone actually been? Unfortunately, as I cannot stand being in large crowds of people, Festivals in general aren't for me. Would be good to hear of other Forum members Glasto (or other music festival) experiences.

    Went to Glastonbury in 2015 managed to pick up a mild stomach bug so was a little miserable. Having said that, if you're going to feel slightly off colour at any festival, the nature of Glastonbury means there's slightly more chilled forms of entertainment so you aren't standing at a stage all day.

    It's massive, just a different scale to any of the other festivals I've been to (Download, Wacken and Blue Dot). It's almost a different thing entirely.

    Overall highlight from Glastonbury was probably seeing Motorhead one last time.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,517

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,552

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
    Yes the business model has changed, but the consumer seems happy to pay a lot to see live music now.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,517

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
    Yes the business model has changed, but the consumer seems happy to pay a lot to see live music now.
    Scalped prices were always higher than face value. There was a sort of socialist effort to keep prices low.

    I remember Madonna’s ticket prices were once a news item. Now I think most labels just try to price them better
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,435
    Streaming has pretty much stopped recorded music making any artist rich so touring and merchandise are their main income now. It feels like the big acts are now constantly on tour other than a brief period while they record / promote a new album ahead of the next tour.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,552

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
    Yes the business model has changed, but the consumer seems happy to pay a lot to see live music now.
    Scalped prices were always higher than face value. There was a sort of socialist effort to keep prices low.

    I remember Madonna’s ticket prices were once a news item. Now I think most labels just try to price them better
    There is still more interest in going than there was before. It used to be easy to get a ticket, and it cost a lot less.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,201
    Pross said:

    Streaming has pretty much stopped recorded music making any artist rich so touring and merchandise are their main income now. It feels like the big acts are now constantly on tour other than a brief period while they record / promote a new album ahead of the next tour.

    I'd have thought that even at $0.003 per stream, some of the older artists are probably making more now than since people bought the greatest hits on CD.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,435

    Pross said:

    Streaming has pretty much stopped recorded music making any artist rich so touring and merchandise are their main income now. It feels like the big acts are now constantly on tour other than a brief period while they record / promote a new album ahead of the next tour.

    I'd have thought that even at $0.003 per stream, some of the older artists are probably making more now than since people bought the greatest hits on CD.
    Possibly but not great for the newer artists with no back catalogue.

    It always shocks me when you look back to the 80s and earlier and see the number of singles sold by acts then discover they never had a number one. Duran Duran managed two number 1 singles in total, Spandau managed just one.
  • Jezyboy
    Jezyboy Posts: 2,894

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
    Yes the business model has changed, but the consumer seems happy to pay a lot to see live music now.
    Scalped prices were always higher than face value. There was a sort of socialist effort to keep prices low.

    I remember Madonna’s ticket prices were once a news item. Now I think most labels just try to price them better
    There is still more interest in going than there was before. It used to be easy to get a ticket, and it cost a lot less.
    Post COVID, this also seems to be the case with F1.

    As for the cost, someone has to pay the 140 million dollar salary for the ticket master ceo.
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,517
    Jezyboy said:

    I find it a bit strange how much more popular live music is now. You used to be able to see most bands for less than the cost of a CD.

    I guess the money has changed.

    Used to be about generating interest to drive sales - now it’s the other way around
    Yes the business model has changed, but the consumer seems happy to pay a lot to see live music now.
    Scalped prices were always higher than face value. There was a sort of socialist effort to keep prices low.

    I remember Madonna’s ticket prices were once a news item. Now I think most labels just try to price them better
    There is still more interest in going than there was before. It used to be easy to get a ticket, and it cost a lot less.
    Post COVID, this also seems to be the case with F1.

    As for the cost, someone has to pay the 140 million dollar salary for the ticket master ceo.
    Big tour operators should just hire their guys and use their software to price their own tickets better and put them out of business.

    And/or demand face pictures on tickets.
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,552
    On the plus side, there's no crowd surfing or stage diving any more.
  • wavefront
    wavefront Posts: 397
    It’s hard to say. I did a (unfair) comparison for Brothers in Arms, one of the words best selling albums at over 30 million copies. The top track off the album on Spotify has been streamed over 530 million times, but all the tracks combined are just over 1.5billion streams.

    By Spotify’s example that should net the artist 4.6 million dollars. By CD’s, Dire straits should have made something like 30 million dollars (assuming 10% of CD cost)

    Don’t think older popular artists are making anywhere near as much as they used to, the 0.003 per stream is pittance. Van Halen III, the unloved album only has 6.5 million streams so would only net the band £20,000

    Finally a fav band of mine, Megson, had 1/4 million streams on one of their albums netting them $786. I bought their CD at a gig for over £10 and suspect due to their tour being sold out they probably made a similar amount in CD sales.

    Touring is certainly where money is made now.
  • Jezyboy
    Jezyboy Posts: 2,894

    On the plus side, there's no crowd surfing or stage diving any more.

    As someone that went to a festival 2 weeks ago, the lack of crowd surfing is news to me...
  • carbonclem
    carbonclem Posts: 1,584
    I've been to Glastonbury about 8 times, first in 2010 so have been there in all weathers. Always really enjoyed it. Has enabled me to see some big ticket names such as Stevie Wonder, Rolling Stones & Paul McCartney for example, and my wife & daughter got to see peak Adele and Ed Sheeran, so always has been great value for money. I do it in a campervan though ...

    Otherwise musically, I'm indie/guitar biased and date my influences back the the 60's. Love Northern Soul/Motown and some modern jazz. Big Beatles fan and have followed Paul Weller through his career. For RC, I've seen Radiohead from Gloucester Leisure Centre to headlining Glastonbury.
    Last gig I went to was Weller, next booked gigs include Gabriels, Blur, Pulp and Billy Bragg in July.
    2020/2021/2022 Metric Century Challenge Winner
  • TheBigBean
    TheBigBean Posts: 20,552
    edited June 2023
    Jezyboy said:

    On the plus side, there's no crowd surfing or stage diving any more.

    As someone that went to a festival 2 weeks ago, the lack of crowd surfing is news to me...
    Cancel that then. I'm not up to date. I had been told it was banned. Although stage diving was always banned and still happened.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,201
    I just saw Paul Weller even though I'm not a massive fan. He had a superb band, and put on a really good show. Went on forever.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,435
    In terms of a show, the best I’ve seen was Jean Michel Jarre Destination Docklands back in 1988. Decades ahead of his time in terms of the spectacle. Only ended up there by chance, I was playing in the National Brass Band champs in London that weekend and a few us managed to get tickets last minute.
  • shirley_basso
    shirley_basso Posts: 6,195

    2013. Was amazing. Good weather, good friends and a superb pitch near to everything. It such a surreal experience as it's so large you can barely imagine the size of the entire estate.

    My main takeaway from that year being "you know how amazing everyone says Glastonbury is,.and that it can't possibly live up to the hype? Well it's even better than that"


    It's one of those unfortunate things, where I know if the whole crowd thing wasn't an issue for me that I would love it, but I know it would just detract and spoil my enjoyment. I completely get why so many do it though. My mate used to go with an old Uni friend of his year after year for a good while. He isn't the type to wax lyrical about anything, but always said it is far better than you can imagine once you experience it yourself.
    I was highly scepital on my way in, but it panned out exactly as your mate says. I guess the line up helps, but it really is amazing.

    Also, while there are tons of people, the crowds aren't insane. There are genuinely 100s of small tents, arenas, areas and other cultural things to do where it's not that busy. You can also stand RIGHT at the back of some of these concerts (even outside the tents and be in quite a lot of open space (relatively speaking).

    I guess it does depend how severely adverse you are to crowds, though.
  • Wheelspinner
    Wheelspinner Posts: 6,559
    Pross said:

    Streaming has pretty much stopped recorded music making any artist rich so touring and merchandise are their main income now. It feels like the big acts are now constantly on tour other than a brief period while they record / promote a new album ahead of the next tour.

    Streaming is *very* lucrative. Remember there are a lot more platforms than just Spotify.

    Apple, Google, Amazon, Pandora, Qobuz, Deezer, Tidal and don’t forget the video platforms You Tube and TikTok. Plus any radio plays if it makes it that far etc.

    The same song in all those being streamed millions of times adds up.

    There’s an excruciatingly awful song by a local singer here calling herself Tones & I. Dance Monkey.

    Now over 2.5 billion streams on Spotify. Over 7 billion streams across all platforms.

    In 2020 alone she made 12 million bucks from that one song on Spotify.

    It’s still a sh!t song, but sure made her rich.

    Do all artists on streaming make a fortune? No, of course not. Do they all deserve to? No.


    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • orraloon
    orraloon Posts: 12,663
    Going back through Glasto sets on the iPlayer. Here's a thing: well impressed by the gigs of 'senior' females like Chrissie Hynde, Sharleen Spiteri, Debbie Harry. 👍 Generation Sex's Billy Idol - meh. I saw John Lydon aka Johnnie R back in way back in... 2010 😳... with Public Image Limited. Another 'kin A that was.

    Posit: the good ladies last better than the blokes?

    Btw, showing my age here 😉
  • I was highly scepital on my way in, but it panned out exactly as your mate says. I guess the line up helps, but it really is amazing.

    Also, while there are tons of people, the crowds aren't insane. There are genuinely 100s of small tents, arenas, areas and other cultural things to do where it's not that busy. You can also stand RIGHT at the back of some of these concerts (even outside the tents and be in quite a lot of open space (relatively speaking).

    I guess it does depend how severely adverse you are to crowds, though.


    Cheers for this! I haven't given up hope entirely. I feel I may be able to bite the bullet at some point and just go, as I am usually able to build up to these things. You are right though, I think the line up would have to be really good to get me over the line!
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,201
    orraloon said:

    Going back through Glasto sets on the iPlayer. Here's a thing: well impressed by the gigs of 'senior' females like Chrissie Hynde, Sharleen Spiteri, Debbie Harry. 👍 Generation Sex's Billy Idol - meh. I saw John Lydon aka Johnnie R back in way back in... 2010 😳... with Public Image Limited. Another 'kin A that was.

    Posit: the good ladies last better than the blokes?

    Btw, showing my age here 😉

    The other two are in their 70s, but Sharleen Spiteri's only a year older than Dave Grohl.