Will you have the Covid-19 vaccine?

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Comments

  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    I voted yes and honestly cannot understand why, unless you have an underlying condition that means you can't, why anyone wouldn't.
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338
    MattFalle said:

    I voted yes and honestly cannot understand why, unless you have an underlying condition that means you can't, why anyone wouldn't.


    Freedom of choice.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,252
    Choices have consequences.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    pblakeney said:

    Choices have consequences.

    this
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    joe2019 said:

    MattFalle said:

    I voted yes and honestly cannot understand why, unless you have an underlying condition that means you can't, why anyone wouldn't.


    Freedom of choice.
    agree completely - you can't advocate freedom of chouce with selfish stupidity
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,593
    "Alexa, should I have the freedom not to have a vaccine and thereby potentially spread a deadly virus?"
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    edited March 2021
    Personally I am inclined, mildly, toward the libertarian end of the spectrum.

    It is true that, technically, everyone has the freedom of choice to step in front of a bus and pull in a few other people behind them.

    But it would be stretching the definition of "freedom of choice" quite a lot
  • DeVlaeminck
    DeVlaeminck Posts: 8,800
    I've voted mind your own business - I do think it should be freedom of choice and I don't agree with public shaming of those who choose not to. I'd prefer to rely on persuasion through reasoned argument.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338

    "Alexa, should I have the freedom not to have a vaccine and thereby potentially spread a deadly virus?"


    I wasn't aware that the vaccine stops the spread of infection?
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,593
    joe2019 said:

    "Alexa, should I have the freedom not to have a vaccine and thereby potentially spread a deadly virus?"


    I wasn't aware that the vaccine stops the spread of infection?

    Early data suggesting it does, significantly.
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338

    joe2019 said:

    "Alexa, should I have the freedom not to have a vaccine and thereby potentially spread a deadly virus?"


    I wasn't aware that the vaccine stops the spread of infection?

    Early data suggesting it does, significantly.

    Anthony Fauci's not so sure:

    “It is conceivable, maybe likely, that vaccinated people can get infected with the coronavirus and then spread it to someone else, and that more will be known about this likelihood in some time, as we do some follow-up studies.”
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,593
    Caution, for sure, not least as if they get it wrong, it could be bad news. But still encouraging signs.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/01/dr-scott-gottlieb-says-data-shows-covid-vaccines-reduces-transmission.html
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338

    Caution, for sure, not least as if they get it wrong, it could be bad news. But still encouraging signs.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/01/dr-scott-gottlieb-says-data-shows-covid-vaccines-reduces-transmission.html


    Yep, let's hope they haven't got it wrong.
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674

    I've voted mind your own business - I do think it should be freedom of choice and I don't agree with public shaming of those who choose not to. I'd prefer to rely on persuasion through reasoned argument.

    I think you do have a point - heaping abuse on people is not always the best way to get them to do the right thing.

    Reasoned argument can include things like "you are less likely to die" and "you are less likely to kill other people" and their logical corollary "don't be a muppet"
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338
    The question I ask myself is, 'would I let them give this relatively unproven vaccine to my teenage children' (who have had all their childhood vaccines to date).
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 26,870
    joe2019 said:

    "Alexa, should I have the freedom not to have a vaccine and thereby potentially spread a deadly virus?"


    I wasn't aware that the vaccine stops the spread of infection?
    This is the difference between something that doesn't happen but is very likely, and something that there is no conclusive proof for yet.

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,252
    joe2019 said:

    The question I ask myself is, 'would I let them give this relatively unproven vaccine to my teenage children' (who have had all their childhood vaccines to date).

    To which the logical answer is, yes.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • pinkbikini
    pinkbikini Posts: 876
    joe2019 said:

    The question I ask myself is, 'would I let them give this relatively unproven vaccine to my teenage children' (who have had all their childhood vaccines to date).

    At some point this summer lots of parents are going to have to decide how to advise their teens (for 18 & 19yr olds). But you have to ask the other question too, about the risk of longer-term complications from a virus which is relatively new.

    No easy answer, but I’m definitely on the vaccination side.
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338
    pblakeney said:

    joe2019 said:

    The question I ask myself is, 'would I let them give this relatively unproven vaccine to my teenage children' (who have had all their childhood vaccines to date).

    To which the logical answer is, yes.

    I wonder if you have teenagers?

  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,252
    joe2019 said:

    pblakeney said:

    joe2019 said:

    The question I ask myself is, 'would I let them give this relatively unproven vaccine to my teenage children' (who have had all their childhood vaccines to date).

    To which the logical answer is, yes.

    I wonder if you have teenagers?

    As grand children, yes.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,475
    For someone who said they're not anti-vax you are coming across as finding lots of reasons for arguing against having the vaccination. As for the teenage kids question, my teenage daughter (and early 20s daughter) are both very keen to have it ASAP as they want to be able to get things back to normal as soon as possible.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 26,252
    Scores on the doors to date.
    72%, 0%, 25%, 2%. Guess which option is 0%?
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338
    edited March 2021
    Pross said:

    For someone who said they're not anti-vax you are coming across as finding lots of reasons for arguing against having the vaccination. As for the teenage kids question, my teenage daughter (and early 20s daughter) are both very keen to have it ASAP as they want to be able to get things back to normal as soon as possible.


    I"ve had all my vaccinations, including all the African/Asian travel versions.

    With so many willing guinea pigs, why would I rush to get this one without being better informed?
  • joe_totale-2
    joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333

    Stevo_666 said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    Stevo_666 said:

    Been there, done it, got the t-shirt.



    Do you fancy swapping places with me and teaching trumpet in school next week, as I've got to mix with lots of children, and haven't been vaccinated yet?

    On the basis that I know squit all about tax, and I suspect you've no idea how to play the trumpet, it seems like a fairly balanced proposal. What could possibly go wrong?
    I like Devon - we used to go on hols there when I was a kid, so if you can just wait till it gets a bit warmer, you're on.

    So the race is on... will it get warm enough for you before I'm vaccinated?
    I'm Northern, so later this month should be OK weather-wise.
    It's a wet county though Stevo - lots more rain than Dorset or Somerset.


    Actually not true for large chunks of Devon, though it varies massively - you'll notice that the southern Exe & Culm Valleys are actually drier than most of Dorset, but if you head west towards Dartmoor, it does get significantly damper.


    I think I read that it rains twice as much in Princetown as it does in Plymouth, there's 15 miles between the two. I grew up in Tavistock and one abiding memory is the fact that it rains constantly from October to March.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,475
    pblakeney said:

    Scores on the doors to date.
    72%, 0%, 25%, 2%. Guess which option is 0%?

    You'd feel a bit silly looking at that whilst not intending having it I would have thought. I've been very pleasantly surprised by the extent of take up so far, reportedly over 90% in all the categories that have been offered the jab. I suspect it will reduce in the younger age groups where people are invincible but it looks like it will be way in excess of the two thirds that originally thought I was being optimistic in predicting.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 18,593



    I think I read that it rains twice as much in Princetown as it does in Plymouth, there's 15 miles between the two. I grew up in Tavistock and one abiding memory is the fact that it rains constantly from October to March.


    Yes, indeed - dairy farmer friends moved there from the opposite side of the moor, to go from 27" of rain a year to 60" a year, so they get plentiful amounts of grass.


    Loads of brilliant maps here: https://www.metoffice.gov.uk/research/climate/maps-and-data/uk-actual-and-anomaly-maps - you can see both big trends (such as the influence of the Atlantic and prevailing winds) and quite small regional differences.

  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 41,475
    joe2019 said:

    Pross said:

    For someone who said they're not anti-vax you are coming across as finding lots of reasons for arguing against having the vaccination. As for the teenage kids question, my teenage daughter (and early 20s daughter) are both very keen to have it ASAP as they want to be able to get things back to normal as soon as possible.


    I"ve had all my vaccinations, including all the African/Asian travel versions.

    With so many willing guinea pigs, why would I rush to get this one without being better informed?
    Because the greatest likelihood of you contracting Covid will be when things reopen and not everyone has been vaccinated?

    What exactly is it you don't think has been adequately tested in the trials?
  • joe_totale-2
    joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    And in answer to the OP's question, my second jab is in a month and I can't wait.
    The reason I'm getting it quickly is because of my job and frankly working from home is not at all ideal in carrying out my job.
  • joe2019
    joe2019 Posts: 1,338
    edited March 2021
    Pross said:

    pblakeney said:

    Scores on the doors to date.
    72%, 0%, 25%, 2%. Guess which option is 0%?

    You'd feel a bit silly looking at that whilst not intending having it I would have thought. I've been very pleasantly surprised by the extent of take up so far, reportedly over 90% in all the categories that have been offered the jab. I suspect it will reduce in the younger age groups where people are invincible but it looks like it will be way in excess of the two thirds that originally thought I was being optimistic in predicting.

    Yep, pretty conclusive so far, I guess it reflects the demographic on here.

    In a recent poll on Chemist & Druggist 56% of the respondents said they would NOT have it - would they be mainly pharmacists?

    https://www.chemistanddruggist.co.uk/news/more-half-cd-readers-wont-get-covid-19-vaccine