Road tubeless tyres, where and how much?

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  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 23,878
    munkster wrote:
    Sounds good. Re: your article about overcompensating on the spoke tension, when I built these Pacenti SL23's up I tensioned them up (using Park Tools meter) to just about the recommended amount (possibly a shade above but not much more). It has never occurred to me to go higher to account for tyre pressures but it does obviously make sense that their in-service tension will be lower. They seem absolutely fine so far (as have all the other wheels I have built for myself and one or two others with many 000s of kms on them) - is the general advice (tubeless or otherwise) to go beyond that max tension or is this just your own findings that you are passing on?

    I just wanted to give some numbers in response to the fears... from what I have measured tubed or tubeless makes little if any difference.
  • tim wandtim wand Posts: 2,945
    tim wand wrote:
    Right scratch that. Found them , Called the Argents in the UK.

    Also found a review that says the Stans 340 are good for 105kg rider? Superstar components however only state 85kg. which is it?

    UGO what would you recommend? I m looking for sub 1500 grams, Tubeless , aluminium clincher , with a tyre profile of 25mm for better comfort and less flats. My weight is 85 to 90kg. Not racing but want to hold my own in chain gang!

    I think only the Pacenti SL 23 fits your requirements (20/28 would be my advice). If you have time to wait, the new 2015 one should be a much better rim in all possible ways.
    It is also paramount that you go for a decent build with adequate tension

    What hubs would you recommend for the and spacing to match those? I like the serviceability of Shimano hubs, and Hope. I take it both of these would build well into those rims?


    http://whosatthewheel.com/2015/04/26/ro ... e-tension/

    What hubs would you recommend for the drilling and spacing to match those? I like the serviceability of Shimano hubs, and Hope. I take it both of these would build well into those rims?
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 23,878
    tim wand wrote:
    What hubs would you recommend for the drilling and spacing to match those? I like the serviceability of Shimano hubs, and Hope. I take it both of these would build well into those rims?

    Yes
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    2 x 28c Schwalbe One tubeless on way from bike discount. £63.
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  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    DPD have my tyres out for delivery. 2 days from Germany. Excellent.

    Shall fit today.......
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  • w00dsterw00dster Posts: 860
    How are you guys finding the longevity of tubeless tyres?
    My Bontrager R3's are starting to cut up, rear tyre is showing a fair bit of wear, approx 8 weeks in and 210 Miles a week on average. Used in all weather and on some pretty grim roads.
    Front is fine so suspect it's more down to flint damage rather than wear and tear.
    Still puncture free, so still happy! Probably going to try the Schwalbe Ones next.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 23,878
    w00dster wrote:
    How are you guys finding the longevity of tubeless tyres?
    My Bontrager R3's are starting to cut up, rear tyre is showing a fair bit of wear, approx 8 weeks in and 210 Miles a week on average. Used in all weather and on some pretty grim roads.
    Front is fine so suspect it's more down to flint damage rather than wear and tear.
    Still puncture free, so still happy! Probably going to try the Schwalbe Ones next.

    I've done around 2,000 miles on my Schwalbe ONE. To be honest I could do another 1,000 or maybe a bit more... the rear is wearing off and the front had 3 quite big punctures (they all sealed) which left sizeable cuts on the surface (2-3 mm on the outer rubber). I have however decided to retire them... IMO tyres are the singe most important part of a bike and it's not worth scrimping or trying to get extra life out of them...
  • JoostGJoostG Posts: 189
    In my case I use my tubeless tyres just as long as my regular clinchers in the past. That is a bonus when you keep in mind that I ride my tubeless in worse conditions (weather and road) then I did with clincher in the past.
    Recently I added the hutchinson Sector 28mm to my tubeless collection: so far 500km of gravel, dirt, road and cobbles (Flanders) and still looking brand new.
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    2-3k sounds right to me. They're going on best bike so, on that basis, it's quite a long period of usage!

    I may get round to trying the Hyper Voyager on the other set of Pacenti's at some point. I'd expect a much longer period out of them!
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  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Just arrived, they are quite substantial! And I like that. Look like they will, as Ugo says, last for a decent amount of time.
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  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Front done. So that's a One 28c on a Pacenti Sl25.

    Ridiculously easy. Took about 10 minutes. Getting the tyre seated the keep the first bit of air was the hardest. After that, quick track pump, up to 80psi.

    Haven't put sealant in yet. I might pop up the chemist to get a syringe for that.
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  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 23,878
    Front done. So that's a One 28c on a Pacenti Sl25.

    Ridiculously easy. Took about 10 minutes. Getting the tyre seated the keep the first bit of air was the hardest. After that, quick track pump, up to 80psi.

    Haven't put sealant in yet. I might pop up the chemist to get a syringe for that.

    What size does it balloon to?

    25s on those rims come at 28, so 28 should come at 29-30?
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    No calipers. So dunno. Just done the rear. Even easier. Popped up the chemist, got a 5ml syringe with an end which fitted the valve. Did that 11 times. Trick is to suck back a bit on each so you don't get blowback.

    Tyres sitting happily. Piece of cake.
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  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 23,878
    No calipers. So dunno. Just done the rear. Even easier. Popped up the chemist, got a 5ml syringe with an end which fitted the valve. Did that 11 times. Trick is to suck back a bit on each so you don't get blowback.

    Tyres sitting happily. Piece of cake.

    Here's a convert... :mrgreen:
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Honest, I've fitted tyres that take as long. I don't fancy swapping in a tube mid ride but, if I had to, then that would mean the tyre is pretty much finished!
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  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    They're still up.
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  • ddraverddraver Posts: 19,287
    Anyone come across any Tubeless Tyres I could run on 19mm wide 700c/29er MTB rims for a tour?

    CX or "Gravel" sort of thing
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Vittoria XG Pro TNT?
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  • ddraverddraver Posts: 19,287
    Good call, but it needs to be more Slick than that. I think a "gravel grinder" tyre would be ideal but few of them seem to be tubeless (which is weird as gravel bikes would seem to be callin gout for that sort of tech)
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • JoostGJoostG Posts: 189
    ddraver wrote:
    Good call, but it needs to be more Slick than that. I think a "gravel grinder" tyre would be ideal but few of them seem to be tubeless (which is weird as gravel bikes would seem to be callin gout for that sort of tech)

    Hutchinson Sector 28mm: bought them for gravel roads in southern france (this summer). Got them last month and used them in Flanders (sportive version RVV) and a lot on local gravel roads (or schelpenpaadjes as you could call it). Got them from cycletyres.fr for a reasonable price.
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Given their weight (and as such robustness) I don't know what the Hutchison would offer over the 28c Schwalbe One?
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  • alanscoachdriveralanscoachdriver Posts: 1
    edited April 2015
    I haven't gone tubeless myself but my new bike has tubeless ready wheels. So I have been reading up on them and followed this thread with interest as I may try them when my tyres need replacing in the future.

    I have just come across this on Indiegogo https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/milk ... 77118#home

    So one thing I haven't seen much about is how often people check and top up their sealant or if this is really a problem or not.

    Any comments regarding the ongoing maintenance once you have fitted the tyres ?
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    I'm going with hmmmmmmmmm.

    If I understand that the patented valve must allow the tyre to be kept at pressure. Then you insert the tube and the existing sealant, under pressure, is forced out. Then you top up, repush and done.

    It's neat. If it's cheap. I just bang more in every now and again.

    It's a solution to a problem. I don't know if the problem really exists.
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  • ddraverddraver Posts: 19,287
    JoostG wrote:
    ddraver wrote:
    Good call, but it needs to be more Slick than that. I think a "gravel grinder" tyre would be ideal but few of them seem to be tubeless (which is weird as gravel bikes would seem to be callin gout for that sort of tech)

    Hutchinson Sector 28mm: bought them for gravel roads in southern france (this summer). Got them last month and used them in Flanders (sportive version RVV) and a lot on local gravel roads (or schelpenpaadjes as you could call it). Got them from cycletyres.fr for a reasonable price.


    Would they fit on 19mm rims? I thought they'd be too thin?
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    Should do, just about. On the margin according to Sheldon Brown. I'd go bigger myself. But the +30c stuff tends to be knobblier (at least tubeless ready tyres).
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  • ddraverddraver Posts: 19,287
    yeah, hence I was looking for semi slick CX or Gravel tyres (which might make the "MTB" trails in NL a bit more exciting too)
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    I commute a lot on my XG TNT. They're fine on road, and excellent on the trails.
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  • ddraverddraver Posts: 19,287
    ...the XN would be perfect but it's not sodding TNT :evil:
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • JoostGJoostG Posts: 189
    Given their weight (and as such robustness) I don't know what the Hutchison would offer over the 28c Schwalbe One?

    Good questions. This is how I see after approx 450km with the Hutchinson and 10.000 km with Schwalbe One's: do you stick meanly to better roads, than go for Schwalbe. Worse conditions, cobbles, gravel, etc, in that case I would recommend the Hutchinsons with my little experience yet. Why? No single (smaller) cut yet. They just seem to be very though and still offer a good ride as I don't feel to ride any slower.

    @ DDraver, they will fit. I mounted them on campa eurus (20mm). And I will use them in the future on Dutch trails as well in my CX bike.
  • bendertherobotbendertherobot Posts: 11,612
    ddraver wrote:
    ...the XN would be perfect but it's not sodding TNT :evil:

    Doesn't necessarily have to be. Look here:

    http://www.cxmagazine.com/going-tubeles ... mendations

    XN not mentioned but since it's effectively all one family of tyres it might well do.
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