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Rim Brake Sales

Popped into Bowman Cycles today to check out bike colours for my 3C rim brake bike. Interestingly Bowman said that rim brakes sales have gone up, rather than down as they had expected and despite the 3C being the only rim brake bike in the range it represents a 3rd of their sales.

Thank god some manufacturers are providing choice and letting sales decide what to make rather than marketing.
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Posts

  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 16,329
    Small manufacturers benefitting from the big manufacturers shift?
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • PMarkPMark Posts: 81
    edited 2 July
    If I understand you right, 66% of people are still buying disc brake bikes. But would be interesting to see some proper stats on that as I have heard other places say there is more availability of rim brake parts at the moment, so maybe some people are just buying what is available.

    Just how people still make steel bikes, I can't see rim bikes ever going away. But you won't get me ever buying one again. :D
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500


    from this month's cyclist - interview with bod who set up Reap cycles

    Rim brakes - all you ever need
  • rwooferrwoofer Posts: 131
    PMark said:

    If I understand you right, 66% of people are still buying disc brake bikes. But would be interesting to see some proper stats on that as I have heard other places say there is more availability of rim brake parts at the moment, so maybe some people are just buying what is available.

    Just how people still make steel bikes, I can't see rim bikes ever going away. But you won't get me ever buying one again. :D

    They have two disc brake bikes covering race (Palace 3) and enduance (Weald), so on a per frame basis, rim sales are matching disc.

    I think pblakeney is probably right in that small brands are picking up the business because big brands are not offering the choice. That was certainly my reason and the reality is that between very cheap frames and uber expensive (Pinarello Dogma) the market is now barren, despite what some of the magazines claim.

    However as far as Far East manufacturing is concerned it is actually easier for a large brands to offer niche products, because they are in a far better negotiating position. We can only hope that when supply is back to normal, that some major brands might start to give us choice again. Hope it is though....
  • diplodicusdiplodicus Posts: 620
    MattFalle said:



    from this month's cyclist - interview with bod who set up Reap cycles

    Rim brakes - all you ever need

    And amphibious bikes apparently... :D
  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 3,378
    Once the manufacturers have got everyone onto discs they'll start launching a load of new rim brake models proclaiming them to be the best thing since sliced bread.

    Bit like Specialized bringing out that new totally un-aero Aethos thing despite years of telling us that aero is everything.
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    And as much as PMark will only ever buy disc bikes I have no intention of ever buying one.

  • lincolndavelincolndave Posts: 9,441
    MattFalle said:

    And as much as PMark will only ever buy disc bikes I have no intention of ever buying one.

    Neither will i

  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,417
    MattFalle said:

    And as much as PMark will only ever buy disc bikes I have no intention of ever buying one.

    ^^This
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,422
    In principle, if they came down in price and in weight, I wouldn't have a fundamental objection to buying a bike with hydraulics...
    the real issue for me is that, being a home mechanic with very little experience with hydraulics, I'd have to learn, buy tools etc... bike shops can't be relied upon these days. If you have a problem, they "book you in" for 6 weeks later!

    As things stand, weight is not competitive for the price bracket I could afford.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 16,329
    edited 4 July

    In principle, if they came down in price and in weight, I wouldn't have a fundamental objection to buying a bike with hydraulics...
    the real issue for me is that, being a home mechanic with very little experience with hydraulics, I'd have to learn, buy tools etc... bike shops can't be relied upon these days. If you have a problem, they "book you in" for 6 weeks later!

    As things stand, weight is not competitive for the price bracket I could afford.

    ^^This.
    Sticking with rims for the foreseeable.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    edited 4 July

    In principle, if they came down in price and in weight, I wouldn't have a fundamental objection to buying a bike with hydraulics...
    the real issue for me is that, being a home mechanic with very little experience with hydraulics, I'd have to learn, buy tools etc... bike shops can't be relied upon these days. If you have a problem, they "book you in" for 6 weeks later!

    As things stand, weight is not competitive for the price bracket I could afford.

    yup - this.

    added to ugly fat hoods needed to accomidate the hydraulics, all the fagging needed re changing hoses, short pad life, the noise.......

    nah thanks. never had any problems with rims, thats the way i'm stayibg.

    also means my stock of wheels can still be used and i don't have to buy price inflated price disc wheels.
  • super_davosuper_davo Posts: 656
    Strongly hope I can still get a decent rim brake bike next year because I can get a competitive weight semi aero bike for under my £3k cycle to work scheme limit. Would have zero chance for a disc brake - it would be an 8kilo porker at that price.

    Disc brake bikes have their advantages but if you're intending on racing, where you hardly ever touch the brakes anyway, it's just ballast (and dry weather braking is as good as you ever need anyway).
  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 3,378
    One would think that if it was possible to make a disc braked bike the same weight as the equivalent rim braked one they would have managed it by now. As it stands, a kilo extra weight seems to be about standard.
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    Bizarrely Ineos seem to not do too bad on rim braked bikes....
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 7,176
    MattFalle said:

    Bizarrely Ineos seem to not do too bad on rim braked bikes....

    Carapaz was dropped on the climb. If he'd have been on discs he would have caught up on the descent. Surely?
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    According to the marketing, undoubtedly.
  • ibr17xviiibr17xvii Posts: 792
    mrb123 said:

    One would think that if it was possible to make a disc braked bike the same weight as the equivalent rim braked one they would have managed it by now. As it stands, a kilo extra weight seems to be about standard.


    They can. They are just twice the price of the equivalent rim braked version.

    I have a disc brake winter bike where weight isn't a consideration. Yes there are downsides to them but there are advantages as well so all things being equal it does what I need it to do.

    Do I "need" discs? No.
    Would I buy another? For winter use, yes. On a best bike, no.

    That said I don't agree at all with all the biggest bike brands not catering for rim brakes. Consumers should have the choice & not be made to have 1 or the other.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 7,176
    Has anyone mentioned ride quality yet? Disc brakes need very stiff fork legs to transfer the braking force without getting chatter. All of the dsic braked bikes I've ever ridden are quite wooden and harsh as a result (albeit only 3).

    I remember the first carbon-forked road bike I ever owned. When I lined the front hub up with the bars in my eye line, I could see it move when I went over bumps. Probably that was a bit extreme, but that little bit of compliance is present in my rim-braked bikes and they are much more enjoyable to ride as a result. They also feel more planted somehow - almost as though they are following the road rather than getting your wrists and elbows to do that part.
  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 3,378
    ibr17xvii said:

    mrb123 said:

    One would think that if it was possible to make a disc braked bike the same weight as the equivalent rim braked one they would have managed it by now. As it stands, a kilo extra weight seems to be about standard.


    They can. They are just twice the price of the equivalent rim braked version.

    I have a disc brake winter bike where weight isn't a consideration. Yes there are downsides to them but there are advantages as well so all things being equal it does what I need it to do.

    Do I "need" discs? No.
    Would I buy another? For winter use, yes. On a best bike, no.

    That said I don't agree at all with all the biggest bike brands not catering for rim brakes. Consumers should have the choice & not be made to have 1 or the other.
    I did say the equivalent rim braked version.

    TBH I run discs on my winter bike, gravel bike and MTB and in some ways would like to have my summer bike running them.

    When I look at the cost of a bike matching the weight of my current rim braked summer bike that is 7.6kg in XL size with pedals and mounts and cost me under 2.5k I tend to think again!
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,591
    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,422
    oxoman said:

    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.

    it is perfectly possibly you'll never need to touch the hydraulics, but if you do, then I don't know what your LBS wait list is, but over here you are looking at weeks rather than days... hence the need for a bike I can spanner myself... summer is short, you can't fuxx it up waiting around for someone to bother fixing your bike
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 7,225

    Has anyone mentioned ride quality yet? Disc brakes need very stiff fork legs to transfer the braking force without getting chatter. All of the dsic braked bikes I've ever ridden are quite wooden and harsh as a result (albeit only 3).

    I remember the first carbon-forked road bike I ever owned. When I lined the front hub up with the bars in my eye line, I could see it move when I went over bumps. Probably that was a bit extreme, but that little bit of compliance is present in my rim-braked bikes and they are much more enjoyable to ride as a result. They also feel more planted somehow - almost as though they are following the road rather than getting your wrists and elbows to do that part.


    Yes the one disc braked road bike I've owned is similarly harsh at the front end. Considering it's steel I was hoping for some of the springyness of the old steel race frames I used to own but there's none of it.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • super_davosuper_davo Posts: 656

    oxoman said:

    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.

    it is perfectly possibly you'll never need to touch the hydraulics, but if you do, then I don't know what your LBS wait list is, but over here you are looking at weeks rather than days... hence the need for a bike I can spanner myself... summer is short, you can't fuxx it up waiting around for someone to bother fixing your bike
    I had to buy kit and watch a lot of YouTube videos to do my Hydraulics (needed just to change handlebars). Not stupid amounts of money for the tools (maybe £50 all in), not stupidly hard to do, but it's a noticeably harder, more time consuming and a messier job than rim brakes.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,422

    oxoman said:

    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.

    it is perfectly possibly you'll never need to touch the hydraulics, but if you do, then I don't know what your LBS wait list is, but over here you are looking at weeks rather than days... hence the need for a bike I can spanner myself... summer is short, you can't fuxx it up waiting around for someone to bother fixing your bike
    I had to buy kit and watch a lot of YouTube videos to do my Hydraulics (needed just to change handlebars). Not stupid amounts of money for the tools (maybe £50 all in), not stupidly hard to do, but it's a noticeably harder, more time consuming and a messier job than rim brakes.
    I've done it once on a MTB system... it's different and in the end you're never quite sure you have done it right or everything will collapse whilst going down Fleet Moss at speed. Also, I didn't need to bleed the brakes, so that is another question mark. Cables give me more confidence and they are simple.
  • katanikatani Posts: 16
    edited 4 July

    oxoman said:

    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.

    it is perfectly possibly you'll never need to touch the hydraulics, but if you do, then I don't know what your LBS wait list is, but over here you are looking at weeks rather than days... hence the need for a bike I can spanner myself... summer is short, you can't fuxx it up waiting around for someone to bother fixing your bike
    All you need to bleed a Shimano system is flat 7 and 8mm spanners, a syringe with a hose, a small plastic bottle and the brake fluid. I purchased such a brake bleeding set 5 years ago for a couple quid and still have it in case I needed it. The system when installed correctly should be 100% air tight so there shouldn't be any need for any more work. Learning is watching a 5min. GCN video on YT. You can 100% DIY, but you do need a bike stand for it or at least something to place the frameset above the floor with the wheel set removed.
  • ibr17xviiibr17xvii Posts: 792

    oxoman said:

    I run both and tbh I'm not fussed either way. Not touched the hydraulic brakes on my defy apart.from pad change after 3yrs. Used a lot but don't brake much. Rim braked bike is my all weather comutte and touring bike , I just ride within the limits of the bike / conditions.

    it is perfectly possibly you'll never need to touch the hydraulics, but if you do, then I don't know what your LBS wait list is, but over here you are looking at weeks rather than days... hence the need for a bike I can spanner myself... summer is short, you can't fuxx it up waiting around for someone to bother fixing your bike
    I had to buy kit and watch a lot of YouTube videos to do my Hydraulics (needed just to change handlebars). Not stupid amounts of money for the tools (maybe £50 all in), not stupidly hard to do, but it's a noticeably harder, more time consuming and a messier job than rim brakes.
    I've done it once on a MTB system... it's different and in the end you're never quite sure you have done it right or everything will collapse whilst going down Fleet Moss at speed. Also, I didn't need to bleed the brakes, so that is another question mark. Cables give me more confidence and they are simple.

    Why would cables give you more confidence?

    Surely a cable is easier to fray or snap altogether than a hydraulic line is to fail?
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    How many cables do you know to have snapped?

    Personally, not hearsay.
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,500
    Its like that bloke who a while ago said that you couldn't use steel bolts from the nut and bolt man for your brakes and you had to use special bicycle ones because the steel ones that hold cars and motorbikes and aeroplanes and cranes and JCBs and tractors and tanks together would snap under the massive braking pressure of a bicycle.

    now he was talking bollox.
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 7,225
    MattFalle said:

    How many cables do you know to have snapped?

    Personally, not hearsay.

    You've obviously not used Ultegra 11 speed shifters ;)
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
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