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Powerlinks don't go together or come apart when squeezed

Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
edited March 2015 in Road general
After watching a few videos on how to connect and disconnect powerlinks, they all say "squeeze the plates together" but that doesn't do anything, it just doesn't work. One video even showed a guy putting one of these inane links together using pliers.

If it takes pliers to put these things on, what purpose do they actually serve, aside from being 100% a gimmick?

Out on the road for example - everyone with a powerlink needs to take a pair of pliers out with them for the powerlink? I have to laugh at this stuff honestly. These inane "links" are the most ridiculous gimmick I know of on a bike. Wheel reflectors have more purpose. Mudguards in the Sahara, would serve more use.

I am only messing about with them to see how they go together out of curiosity - or should I say don't go together. People using these things and raving about them must never remove them or connect them, fair enough if it is just there as part of your chain never going wrong you might be led to think they are fine, or that if it ever needed to be disconnected you could do it by hand... just lol, good luck with that.

People squeezing them must be using ones that have been well worn out or something, new ones don't go together. Put it this way for it to go together I would probably be pulling the chain so hard it would end up cutting my hand, so you need tools then... what a surprise. :roll:

They don't even come off the chain with a chain breaker because of the nature of the powerlink, if it was a normal link however, you could just use the chain breaker to do it. Its pretty ironic actually that you could be stuck somewhere unable to get some stupid thing off your chain where if it was a standard link, you could.

With a chain breaker you can break the chain, so powerlinks introduce a problem that wasn't there before, its LESS time consuming using a chain breaker tool. No squeezing necessary, its as simple as it gets.

This isn't to mention the fact that powerlink outer plates get fused together, meaning you'll be lucky to remove that even if you do have a pair of pliers with you. Last time I had that happen I just had to throw the thing away and redo the chain so it was complete again by adding normal links to it.

These things are absolute garbage.
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Posts

  • NeXXusNeXXus Posts: 854
    Maybe they're just too complicated for you?
    And the people bowed and prayed, to the neon god they made.
  • jamesesjameses Posts: 637
    Are you using a 10 speed SRAM powerlink, by any chance? Those ones aren't designed to come apart (for whatever reason). I've used 9 speed SRAM and both 9 and 10 speed KMC links before and will admit they can be bit fiddly at times, but have never failed to (eventually) open them. It helps to wipe your chain with a rag first, and drop it off the front chainring so you have some slack in the system.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,005
    I use them on every chain, removing the chain for cleaning every now and again then replacing with the same quicklink. Likely that you are, as said above, using a SRAM Powerlink. Buy a reusable one and you will find that they are, well, reusable.
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    edited February 2015
    Its an 8-speed SRAM powerlink.

    I have also got a KMC link, just put it on but can't get it back off without pliers.

    If it is not removable or reusable why do they exist?
  • NeXXus wrote:
    Maybe they're just too complicated for you?

    :lol:
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,005
    They exist to connect the chain on first installation and are meant to remain in situ until the chain is replaced.. Other types are reusable.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    If it is not removable or reusable why do they exist

    Powerlinks exist for 2 reasons; first for joining chains more easily and reliably than allowing cack handed spanner monkeys loose with a chain tool and a joining pin. Secondly to allow chains to be separated to clean them.
    Not all Powerlinks are designed to be taken apart because some of them only exist to fulfil the first idea above.

    But you knew all this, didn't you?
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    edited February 2015
    Up to now I have seen no reason for their existence. Using a chain tool takes less time.

    When your front and rear mechs both shift against these powerlinks enough times, they make the outer plates of the powerlink fuse together. While we're pointing out what I know and don't know, I do know that and they are not to be used as a permanent thing.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    Then use a chain tool and leave the links to those who are less troubled by them.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,005
    Elsewhere you've stated "I read somewhere as well that the SRAM quick link is better to get on and off than the KMC one, although I don't use those things personally." So it makes me wonder why you started this thread.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    When your front and rear mechs both shift against these powerlinks enough times, they make the outer plates of the powerlink fuse together. While we're pointing out what I know and don't know, I do know that and they are not to be used as a permanent thing

    How do you 'know' this?
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    edited February 2015
    gethinceri wrote:
    Elsewhere you've stated "I read somewhere as well that the SRAM quick link is better to get on and off than the KMC one, although I don't use those things personally." So it makes me wonder why you started this thread.

    Someone here might know some trick, but there is no trick, they simply don't work.

    They are touted as something that makes it easier to take your chain on and off, which is just flat out b0llocks.

    If it is meant to be a permanent fixture then it is a useless invention because standard chain links have already been doing that perfectly fine going right back to the 1800's when chains first came about.

    These things are a total gimmick.
    crikey wrote:
    When your front and rear mechs both shift against these powerlinks enough times, they make the outer plates of the powerlink fuse together. While we're pointing out what I know and don't know, I do know that and they are not to be used as a permanent thing

    How do you 'know' this?

    Because I had one on my Rockrider 5.2 and after using the bike for about a year, the powerlink had "fused" into its own pins making it immovable - ironically this wouldn't happen with a standard link, you don't have your mechs making the metal gradually fuse into the pins. See that hole in the powerlink thats a little bit bigger than the hole the pin snaps into? That bigger hole was reduced (fused) so much you can't snap the pin back out, no way, no how.
  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,005
    Well you seem to be getting your gonads in a grind about something that others find totally straightforward. You do not use them so what's your point?
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    What's your point asking me what my point is?

    Powerlinks don't go together or come apart.

    Unless this isn't a bike forum I dunno let me check...
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    Everyone I know who uses them manages perfectly well, myself included. I've used them on a mountain bike, I've used them on a cross bike (which has two on the same chain) and on a road bike. I can only surmise that the problem lies with you.
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mecha ... st12642621

    "after chewing up my fingers getting those links to unlink, which always seems to take too long, I got the Park tool for this job. Yeah it was $14 but boom it works instantly just like you think it should. No more torn up (or dirty) fingers."

    Right then. There is is.

    Can anyone here explain what the advantage is if he needed a tool to use the powerlink?

    Nope.

    Is there any conceivable advantage to using these links?

    Nope.

    Its hardly my fault if I have higher standards than other people and can sniff out BS when I see it. Keep on using them by all means lol. I wouldn't go anywhere too far though.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,837
    Studies have shown that SRAM powerlinks are ok for everyone except cack-handed loons.
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    edited February 2015
    crikey wrote:

    I am only trying to warn people:

    1. You can't remove a powerlink without tools (they are advertised as a "tool free solution")
    2. You can't put on a powerlink without tools (again, they are advertised as a "tool free solution")
    3. After enough time the outer plate fuses making the hole too small to remove the link.

    If it is "sad and strange" to you to point these things out, maybe you should stick to kids cartoons?

    Again its an accepted thing apparently that you'd need tools to use these powerlinks:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/bicycle-mecha ... st12642755

    "You do want the Park tool to make it easier."

    No, I don't. I could just use a chain breaker and do away with the powerlink.

    I didn't know these things existed but I have seen it all now...

    pwN9l0H.jpg

    I think that's considerably bulkier than a chain tool. ;)

    So people just take that Park Tool thing everywhere with them if they have a powerlink on the chain? :roll:

    If you have that tool on you its easier than a chain breaker, but I would say not much quicker and it takes up three times the space and probably twice the weight of a chain breaker. Pointless. Useless.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    1. You can't remove a powerlink without tools (they are advertised as a "tool free solution")
    2. You can't put on a powerlink without tools (again, they are advertised as a "tool free solution")
    3. After enough time the outer plate fuses making the hole too small to remove the link.

    1. Yes you can, provided they are designed to be undone.
    2. Yes you can; this is the whole point of them.
    3. This may have happened to you.

    I may move on to pictures of small elephants with pretensions to aviation...
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    crikey wrote:
    3. This may have happened to you.

    There isn't any "may" about it. I knew these links were useless already because of that fusing where there's a hole in the plate.

    I am just shocked that after checking into them again I find you also need a tool that looks like a pair of pliers to undo the link, making it worse than just having a standard link there because of the fusing thing, which normal links don't suffer from.

    Powerlinks introduce a problem where there wasn't one.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    You can repeat it as much as you want to...
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    crikey wrote:
    You can repeat it as much as you want to...

    Why would me saying anything I am saying be bothering you anyway.

    I won't be replying, I am putting some go faster stripes on my car...
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    :lol: :roll: :lol:
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    You are using the right speed link for your chain arent you?

    Do you think if everyone else is saying something works and yours doesn't, maybe you are doing something wrong?
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Manc33Manc33 Posts: 2,157
    Chris Bass wrote:
    You are using the right speed link for your chain arent you?

    Do you think if everyone else is saying something works and yours doesn't, maybe you are doing something wrong?

    How can I be doing something wrong using a stock bike and the powerlink plates get damaged by the front and rear mech?

    I never knew there needed to be a Park Tool for these links until today, no, but thats because I wouldn't assume something that is advertised as a tool free thing would need a tool for it, why would I.
  • I have power links on all my chains, use them to take it off to give it a thorough clean. Mine have never fused, also, for metal to fuse you need pressure and heat, in high amounts, I don't think your cycling action will generate the energy needed to fuse the links.

    They may be seized from lack of maintenance.
    If the bar ain't bending, you're just pretending
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,837
    Manc33 wrote:
    Chris Bass wrote:
    You are using the right speed link for your chain arent you?

    Do you think if everyone else is saying something works and yours doesn't, maybe you are doing something wrong?

    How can I be doing something wrong using a stock bike and the powerlink plates get damaged by the front and rear mech?

    I never knew there needed to be a Park Tool for these links until today, no, but thats because I wouldn't assume something that is advertised as a tool free thing would need a tool for it, why would I.

    What people are trying to tell you is - nobody else has these problems. The issue is either with you, or with the many hundreds of thousands of satisfied users who have never once managed to mess up such a mundane technical issue.
  • crikeycrikey Posts: 362
    You've had one issue with one link, once.

    Give over now, we get the picture that you can't get on with the link you've got.

    Thanks for sharing.
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    adam0bmx0 wrote:
    They may be seized from lack of maintenance.

    He'd do more maintenance if he could get the chain off :D
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
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