Forum home Road cycling forum Pro race

robert millar

brakeleverbrakelever Posts: 161
edited June 2013 in Pro race
have just read the robert millar book what a blinding read , dont know how i managed to miss it when it came out , but what ever happened to him or is that a question too far , considering he was one of the greatest bike riders britain ever produced its a shame he is not involved still in some way ?
«13456710

Posts

  • timoid.timoid. Posts: 3,133
    Great read and he was a brilliant rider.

    Unfortunately asking a question like "What happened to Robert Millar" will result a lot of nudge nudge wink wink comments, pictures from the daily mail and then a big arguments on here.

    Suffice to say he's living a quiet life away from anything cycling related.
    It's a little like wrestling a gorilla. You don't quit when you're tired. You quit when the gorilla is tired.
  • AidanRAidanR Posts: 1,142
    Yeah, it's a good read.

    Oddly, unbelievably, it seems that the rumours might have been true. But then he never was going to conform to what you wanted him to be.
    Bike lover and part-time cyclist.
  • moray_gubmoray_gub Posts: 3,328
    Timoid. wrote:
    Great read and he was a brilliant rider.

    Unfortunately asking a question like "What happened to Robert Millar" will result a lot of nudge nudge wink wink comments, pictures from the daily mail and then a big arguments on here.

    Suffice to say he's living a quiet life away from anything cycling related.

    Didnt he occasionally post in here as gotthetshirt or something ?
    Gasping - but somehow still alive !
  • Yes, he does seem to read the forum and post -very occasionally. He lives his own life, as he always did, and has hopefully found a good place to be in. He did write a very good article about a stage of the TdF in Rouleur (the Rapha magazine) a few issues ago. It'd be good if he wrote more as he writes bery well and with great honesty, insight and a wry detachment from his own (massive) achievements and the reputations of others.
  • top_bhoytop_bhoy Posts: 1,421
    edited December 2009
    I can't sing his praises high enough. In my younger days, from the comfort of the living room armchair, watching Robert Millar on TV in the mountain stages of a Grand Tour was awesome. He did it his way and is a true legend and inspiration to all other british cyclists if ever there was one.

    As someone who has intimate knowledge of the whole racing world, I wish he would be a more public profile and contribute some more of his views on a whole range of related topics. It is sad that he doesn't but he has his reasons, it is his choice and that has to be respected. Wherever he is and what he is doing now, 'thanks for the memories' and the inspiration to which I am eternally grateful.
  • and anything other than cycling related will be speculation and inuendo

    Ah, but that's also true of so many other threads...
  • top_bhoytop_bhoy Posts: 1,421
    and anything other than cycling related will be speculation and inuendo

    Ah, but that's also true of so many other threads...
    Not true...the majority of most other topics containing the speculation, inuendo and cheap shots at least will have some cycling related attachment. Most times on this forum, the discussions on Robert Millar only ends up one way....with one or two individuals badly throwing cheap shots and mocking the man which have no cycling content whatsoever.
  • Top_Bhoy wrote:
    Note: Any references to anything but Robert Millars cycling related achievements/career should be immediately deleted by the moderators. Few know the real truth of his current life and anything other than cycling related will be speculation and inuendo.

    Whilst I agree with you that comments like that are nothing but speculation and innuendo no need to enforce a stalinst state on here
  • BikingBernieBikingBernie Posts: 2,163
    edited December 2009
    Top_Bhoy wrote:
    Any references to anything but Robert Millars cycling related achievements/career should be immediately deleted by the moderators. Few know the real truth of his current life and anything other than cycling related will be speculation and inuendo.
    Hardly speculation and innuendo. Robert and his partner have even discussed on another cycling forum how his personal life became public. Suffice to say, Millar would be quite happy if no one bought Richard Moore's book about his life...

    Personally, I think it would be great if everyone were totally open about Millar's current life, and were also totally accepting and non-judgemental about it. Those who would like to see all comments about what has happened to him since he retired deleted are in effect reinforcing the view that his choices are somehow wrong or best ‘kept hidden’, attitudes that themselves help to validate the ignorance and prejudice that surround such issues.

    If the argument is that no mention of anyone’s private life is acceptable on a cycling forum, why not start off with deleting all the comments about Cavendish’s shenanigans, or are they acceptable because they show what a ‘red-blooded’ male he is?
  • On a seperate Millar note i remember being on the start line at the malvern hills classic in 1997 or 1998 and i looked to me left and robert millar was next me in full z-team kit.
    I was only 21 at the time but i watched the tour since 89 so i recognized him straight away.. Nobody else even looked at him (Im guessing the late 90's mountain bikers werent familiar with with late 80's cycling royalty)
    It was quite a buzz to be in a real race with a tour legend, i never saw him once the race was underway, he was probably behind me somewhere struggling up the infamous hills...

    I read the book but im never too sure about un-authorised biographys and i though it painted him in a bit of a negative gloomy light... A man who wears frogskins to race in cant be gloomy, its impossible! 8)
  • top_bhoytop_bhoy Posts: 1,421
    dave milne wrote:
    Whilst I agree with you that comments like that are nothing but speculation and innuendo no need to enforce a stalinst state on here
    That wasn't what I was trying to convey so I have now edited and deleted the lines..
  • The book is an excellent read.

    Personally I don't give a toss about the rumours.

    He was emailing Eurosport this year during The Tour, with his insights and expert opinions of the days stage.

    My mate still has a "Z" water bottle off roberts bike. We asked him for it after he won a stage of the Kellogs Tour in Newcastle years ago.

    Top Man
  • DaveyLDaveyL Posts: 5,167
    Moray Gub wrote:
    Timoid. wrote:
    Great read and he was a brilliant rider.

    Unfortunately asking a question like "What happened to Robert Millar" will result a lot of nudge nudge wink wink comments, pictures from the daily mail and then a big arguments on here.

    Suffice to say he's living a quiet life away from anything cycling related.

    Didnt he occasionally post in here as gotthetshirt or something ?

    It was mis-spelled as "gotheteeshirt" and I have my doubts as to whether it was actually RM...
    Le Blaireau (1)
  • moray_gubmoray_gub Posts: 3,328
    DaveyL wrote:
    Moray Gub wrote:
    Timoid. wrote:
    Great read and he was a brilliant rider.

    Unfortunately asking a question like "What happened to Robert Millar" will result a lot of nudge nudge wink wink comments, pictures from the daily mail and then a big arguments on here.

    Suffice to say he's living a quiet life away from anything cycling related.

    Didnt he occasionally post in here as gotthetshirt or something ?

    It was mis-spelled as "gotheteeshirt" and I have my doubts as to whether it was actually RM...

    apart from the obvious fact it could be anybody why do you say that ?
    Gasping - but somehow still alive !
  • dulldavedulldave Posts: 949

    I read the book but im never too sure about un-authorised biographys and i though it painted him in a bit of a negative gloomy light... A man who wears frogskins to race in cant be gloomy, its impossible! 8)

    It's one of my favourite cycling books. I don't think any biography of Robert Millar would be 100% accurate, particularly if it were authorised by him. However I don't think it made him look negative or gloomy. It illustrated what the author believed were 2 sides to his character.

    Personally I kind of like the fact that he has walked away from the world of cycling and only crops up now and again. It just adds to the legend.

    I loved his article about the Alpe D'Huez stage in Rouleur and wish we had access to more of this type of stuff from him. In particular I'd like to read about his Superbagneres victory and the 87 Giro.
    Scottish and British...and a bit French
  • I was there when he won at Super Bagnieres. My best spectating day ever - trying to work out what was going on on Radio Tour was hard, but seeing him come round the corner and on to win was fantastic. My Z and Union flags were proudly displayed on our tent for the rest of our holiday. It was also interesting seeing some big guy called Indurain, who was there to support Delgado lead over Aubisque (I think) the previous day. He looked very impressive, and we agreed that he looked like he was the main man (rather than Delgado) and would surely be a future Tour contender. The only time I have ever been right in a prediction.
    Over 50mph on Malaucene descent
  • Does anyone have a link to the rouleur article?

    PS I reckon gotheteeshirt was him alright.
    Dan
  • dulldavedulldave Posts: 949
    Does anyone have a link to the rouleur article?

    PS I reckon gotheteeshirt was him alright.

    It was in print on this issue:
    http://www.rouleur.cc/issue-13

    Out of print now though.
    Scottish and British...and a bit French
  • BRAKELEVER

    if I gave you one question to ask me what would it be :?:
  • Where do you get the best cream cakes between Paris and Troyes?
  • edited December 2009
    BRAKELEVER

    if I gave you one question to ask me what would it be :?:


    [Millar nerd alert]

    So many questions actually.

    How did it feel winning at Lagos de Covadonga in 1986? Was it like the ultimate raised finger to the Spanish press?
    During that Vuelta, wasn't there a point you got caught in your own hubris - i.e. not taking Pino seriously until it was too late?

    How could you ever sell that Giro to Roche? You had the strongest team, Roche was isolated and badly injured after a crash, how could you ever agree to stay with him instead of playing your own cards? Was Breukink such a threat to you?

    DId you feel like murdering that stupid French television journo trying to get an interview as you'd just quit the 1988 Tour and were waiting for your team car? (I certainly did.)

    How come nobody had told you about the state of the road in that infamous col du coq Dauphiné stage? Was that incident the absolute nadir of your career? Or maybe was it when you lost your saddle as you were riding in the winning break (Lombardia 1986)? Or was it that five-puncture day at the Route du Sud? Or maybe that ridiculous mid-1985 'tartan' photo session with that dude from L'Equipe? (Yeah, I still have the picture at home, not that I'm too keen on showing it to anybody.)
    So many questions, and now there are 2 possibilities. Either you ain't him and cannot answer those questions. Either you are him and wonder if, maybe, I should be on my way (I.e. "twas 20 years ago. F**k off and get a life...")

    It doesn't matter, thanks to Brakelever for this thread. Oh my, what did we do before nostalgia... I think of Robert and it's 1985 again: I'm 15 years old, our arch rivals Olympique Lyon are a shite football team and we trash them twice a year in the derby, there's Ocean Rain playing on my cheap stereo and Back to the Future showing at the local mall. And my cycling hero is an ucompromising Glaswegian.
  • CoyoteCoyote Posts: 212
    Robert is the stuff of true legend, much more so than the pampered pootches of today! The Scottish acid wit he is the master of was clearly too much for the lazy or ill informed journalists of the time and probably still is today.

    My hero watching the Tour on Channel 4 and responsible for getting me into road biking, spending a fortune on the 6 bikes hanging in my garage and having some of the best days of my life....which is nice!
    :lol:
  • mrushtonmrushton Posts: 5,182
    dulldave wrote:
    Does anyone have a link to the rouleur article?

    PS I reckon gotheteeshirt was him alright.

    It was in print on this issue:
    http://www.rouleur.cc/issue-13

    Out of print now though.[/quote

    One of the best articles I've ever read in a cycle mag. You really felt you there suffering with the author and an interesting perspective of what it mus be like to be that good but not quite as good (that day) as the guys who are battling it out down the road. It was Hinault after all,so no apologies needed if you can't get past him!
    M.Rushton
  • dulldavedulldave Posts: 949
    mrushton wrote:
    It was Hinault after all,so no apologies needed if you can't get past him!

    Read it again :D
    Scottish and British...and a bit French
  • Re: Rouleur, issue 13

    I think Prendas Cyclismo may still ahve it, it's on their website as in stock

    www.prendas.co.uk/details.asp?ID=2372

    It's a cracker.
  • How did it feel winning at Lagos de Covadonga in 1986? Was it like the ultimate raised finger to the Spanish press?
    No fngers involved , I messed up there the year before so I was glad to have corrected my tactics for 86.
    During that Vuelta, wasn't there a point you got caught in your own hubris - i.e. not taking Pino seriously until it was too late?
    No I knew the TT would be my weakest stage , Pino beating me there wasn't a surprise that he didn't fall apart later was .
    How could you ever sell that Giro to Roche?
    You had the strongest team, Roche was isolated and badly injured after a crash, how could you ever agree to stay with him instead of playing your own cards? Was Breukink such a threat to you?
    I didn't sell it . I wasn't supposed to be at the Giro according to my program , I was added at the last minute to help Phil Anderson but he didn't have the form and Breukink and myself emerged as the ones from our team in the front group. I needed something to occupy me during the three weeks so I decided to try for the climbers jersey from first stage , the rest of the race held no interest for me personally . I liked Eric Breukink and never rode against him , what did annoy me was Peter Post telling everyone that Breukink was going to beat me in the last day time trial . Post never once said anything encouraging to me during the three weeks , I always felt I was a disappointment to him no matter what so I did what I did best and stuck to being the best climber . I never raced against Roche but I didn't ride for him either , the last mountain stage (that I won)
    I didn't work at all with Roche and Lejaretta when we were in the front because Breukink was chasing just behind.
  • DId you feel like murdering that stupid French television journo trying to get an interview as you'd just quit the 1988 Tour and were waiting for your team car? (I certainly did.)
    Yes but I was too tired for it to be a priority .
    How come nobody had told you about the state of the road in that infamous col du coq Dauphiné stage? Was that incident the absolute nadir of your career?
    All mountain descents are dangerous and on any of them you can hit a fallen rock and hurt yourself , I'd had worse times than that even though I lost a Dauphine because of crashing that day . The following stage of that race finished with a 80kph descent into Gap and it rainied for the last climb and the downhill , being covered in cuts and bruises my nerves weren't up to risking another bad crash so I was dropped at the start of the descent and was frozen by the time I got to the finish on my own then I learned I had to go to the dope control instead of heading off to the hotel . Nerves shattered , cold , hungry , blood oozing from wounds I ended up in tears waiting for my turn to give a sample , that was defenitely worse than the day before .
    Or maybe was it when you lost your saddle as you were riding in the winning break (Lombardia 1986)?
    I arrived for the win in the 1990 Lombardia and my saddle never fell off in any race .
    Or was it that five-puncture day at the Route du Sud?
    I dont remember that happening but it wouldn't have surprised me, you quite often found tacks thrown on the road because someone was protesting about something and messing with the bike race seemed a good way to get publicity
  • Or maybe that ridiculous mid-1985 'tartan' photo session with that dude from L'Equipe? (Yeah, I still have the picture at home, not that I'm too keen on showing it to anybody.)
    You mean the photo book by Bruno Bad , though that might not be his correct surname . That's a collectors item if you had everyone in it to sign their page .


    It doesn't matter, thanks to Brakelever for this thread. Oh my, what did we do before nostalgia... I think of Robert and it's 1985 again: I'm 15 years-old, our arch rivals Olympique Lyon are a shite football team and we trash them twice a year in the derby, there's Ocean Rain playing on my cheap stereo and Back to the Future showing at the local mall. And my cycling hero is an ucompromising Glaswegian.

    You dont have to be from Glasgow to be uncompromising but it helps :wink:

    It's smiles better
  • guineaguinea Posts: 1,177
    Mr teeshirt,

    I didn't start following cycling until TdF 1999 whilst living in France. Unfortunately by then, as a Highlander without a telly, you'd been and gone before I knew what a peleton was.

    The Dailly Record obviously didn't cellebrate your deeds in a manner that stuck in my head. For that I'm truly sorry.

    Since then I've become aware of your achievments, Grand Tour podiums, KoMs, Dauphine win and have learned of the great Scottish legend I never knew.

    Anyway, there's no point to this post other than a thanks for being you.

    All the best and thanks again.
  • Is it true that the frenchmen on your team were smoking cigarettes in your hotelroom after a stage of the tour de france?
Sign In or Register to comment.