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FAQ: increasing your base endurance/etc

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  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    I think its easier to read a training book than it is to get out and train. ;-)

    Lots of people look for the best programme, when everyone is different. Sticking to a sensible plan seems to be the best.
  • Wait 20 years and buy a new training manual. It'll probly tell you to do everything diffrently to 2005 ones anyway so why believe the current crop?

    One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How it got in my pyjamas I'll never know.

    "Not everyone understands house music. Its a spiritual thing; a body thing; a soul thing." Eddie Amador
  • mx5mx5 Posts: 1
    What is trackstand??? sorry if this is dumb....

    don't be mean!!!
    don\'t be mean!!!
  • Trackstand is being able to hold a bike still whist still being seated on it with no feet on the ground and not holding any supports. Typically people do this at traffic lights. It is called a Trackstand as it is a trick of top track riders.

    But before you rush out and try and do this: it is only possible on a "fixed gear" bicycle. On a normal bike the rear hub has a freewheel. On a freewheel bike when you stop pedalling when moving the pawls in the freehub disenguage. This disenguaging lets the bike freewheel, great for going down hills. On a fixed gear bike there is no freewheel! You cannot stop pedalling if the bike is moving

    This is a bit of a nuisance downhills but it is great for trackstands. As it isn't possible to disenguage the drive the bike can by pedaled backwards and go backwards. For remaining stationary the rider can flick tiny amounts backwards and forwards to maintain balance

    If you want to know more about fixed gear bicycles look in the community section for posts with "fixed:" in the title

    --
    allez!! allez!!
  • GonzocpGonzocp Posts: 6,104
    Ah no, common mistake - you can track stand on a free wheeled bike, but it is much more difficult!

    try here

    <font size="1">Disclaimer: Anything I say in this post is entirely chuffy's fault
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  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    Climbing.
    If the hill rises less than 150 metres then try to stand for the entire length. If it's a biggy then alternate equal lengths - saving a little bit for standing at the end.
    Water
    Unless it's a hot day don't bother (and then pour it over your head rather than in your mouth) - it only slows you down by making you sweat more. Practice doing without. The more you drink the more you want. If you stop for a meal then have a glass or two of milk with your pasta. Forget all that special mix stuff. You don't know what's in it.
  • AndySteelAndySteel Posts: 262
    I live in Norfolk so big hills are a rairity but always like the felling once climbed a big one. Even though it hurts like hell afterwards. Hope to be going round sheffiled way soon which will prove more challenging. I also have a granny ing but dont go onto much.... Also how do you ride a wheely?? i can go no handed for ages but cant every wheely. The front either comes up and straight back down or it comes up, keeps on going and i go flying off the back!!

    Any ideas??
  • dan.cavecpdan.cavecp Posts: 2,259
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Simon L2</i>



    Water
    Unless it's a hot day don't bother (and then pour it over your head rather than in your mouth) - it only slows you down by making you sweat more. Practice doing without. The more you drink the more you want. If you stop for a meal then have a glass or two of milk with your pasta. Forget all that special mix stuff. You don't know what's in it.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    What a load of old tosh, that's such bad advice..
    you just don\'t want to know what I had for tea last night..
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Simon L2</i>

    Climbing.
    If the hill rises less than 150 metres then try to stand for the entire length. If it's a biggy then alternate equal lengths - saving a little bit for standing at the end.
    Water
    Unless it's a hot day don't bother (and then pour it over your head rather than in your mouth) - it only slows you down by making you sweat more. Practice doing without. The more you drink the more you want. If you stop for a meal then have a glass or two of milk with your pasta. Forget all that special mix stuff. You don't know what's in it.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    This advice might work for you but the rest of the human race climb more efficently seated, need water to make their muscles continue to work efficently and find that milk is not the best thing to drink at a meal stop during a long ride!


    --
    allez!! allez!!
  • OFOABOFOAB Posts: 905
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Simon L2</i>

    Climbing.
    If the hill rises less than 150 metres then try to stand for the entire length. If it's a biggy then alternate equal lengths - saving a little bit for standing at the end.

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    150 metre rise is a helluva long time to stand up - for eaxample, and if I'm not mistaken, on a 10% gradient that's about 1.5km linear distance,

    I wish I was any place but the someplace I'm in
    I wish I was any place but the someplace I\'m in
  • GonzocpGonzocp Posts: 6,104
    Am I the only one that thought that may have been tounge in cheek?

    <font size="1">Disclaimer: Anything I say in this post is entirely chuffy's fault
    For the forum relay go here, if you are thinking of getting team kit then go here
    </font id="size1">
    <font size="1">So long, farewell, auf Wiedersehen, good night
    </font id="size1">
  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    possibly
    but I did do 100 miles this morning without a water bottle
  • Congratulations Simon, but you are doing yourself more harm then good!

    Garry

    Dr Garry Palmer
    Exercise Physiologist

    http://www.sportstest.co.uk
    Dr Garry Palmer
    Exercise Physiologist

    http://www.sportstest.co.uk
  • dan.cavecpdan.cavecp Posts: 2,259
    [:O]

    That's madness, last time i did a tunner i went through 4 litres of psp22/Go. You're bonkers mate, I don't doubt that you've probably dehydrated yourself no end and you'll feel ill soon.

    tut, tut...

    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Simon L2</i>

    possibly
    but I did do 100 miles this morning without a water bottle
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

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  • Simon L2Simon L2 Posts: 2,908
    Thanks for the advice, but since I've been doing this for 35 years and am now in the form of my life I'll stick with what I know. Cyclists in the fifties and sixties swore by coffee and brandy, but eschewed water. Cyclists used to eat steak. It's a fashion thing.
    Did a 120 on Sunday morning and a 165 on Monday, and for the latter I did take on liquids along the way - it was a warm day - but far less than my companion, who was perspiring in a big way.
  • As a newbie to long rides - how do people transport such massive quantities of liquid? Stop at garages? Take a rucksack?

    RC
  • TrekVetcpTrekVetcp Posts: 248
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by ROBTAX</i>

    As a newbie to long rides - how do people transport such massive quantities of liquid? Stop at garages? Take a rucksack?

    RC
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">
    Hi ROBTAX

    I would like to do such a long ride in June from Aust (old 7 bridge) to Dolgellau 126mls. or even Beddgelert 164mls. via Usk (turn R) and the main roads. Carrying GO bars for food and powder measured in plastic bags to add to the bottled water brought in garages (also toilets).

    Doesn`t look like it will be on though, as my cycling mate hasn`t got a support driver, and whilst I can see the attraction of fish & chips at Rhyader, I don`t see the motivation to get up Dinas without him. Unless of course there are enough volunteers to link up by mobile to help me on my way???

    --
    Westbury Cycle Club - for loads of links and various local routes
    http://web.ukonline.co.uk/westbury/cycling.html
    --
    Q. How do you find your Speedplay pedals?
    A. Easy, I keep them at the ends of my cranks.
  • SeineseekerSeineseeker Posts: 1,525
    Lets be careful here, I am no expert, but personally I think riding long distances at any sort of intensity level and/or in warm or hot weather WITHOUT a water bottle in fact without several, would soon damage your health permanently.

    Not just cycling:
    www.artofpleisure.com www.veloux.com
  • I write as a complete novice, just turned 40, and wondered if people in the know think what I'm trying to do is feasible.

    I bought a bike and did one 210 mile fund raiser last year. London to Leeds overnight via the A1. Had food stops at 70 and 160 and managed the ride in 14.25 hours.

    Started riding again a couple of months ago, slowly building up distance and speed averages.

    I'm off an a 1,000+ mile ride in July and have set myself a target of 170 miles a day for six consecutive days. I'm planning to do two 85 mile stages each day, with an hour break in between stages. I need to average 17mph for ten hours a day to complete the ride.

    I have the determination and motivation to do it, but is it too much to take on? I seem to be able to manage 17mph ok, but what physical difficulties (other than the obvious)can I expect to face over such distances?
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Seineseeker</i>

    Lets be careful here, I am no expert, but personally I think riding long distances at any sort of intensity level and/or in warm or hot weather WITHOUT a water bottle in fact without several, would soon damage your health permanently.

    Not just cycling:
    www.artofpleisure.com www.veloux.com
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    Well obviously cycling with no water is far from ideal, but people do go a bit over the top with this eating and drinking on the go business. If you neck 4 litres of water during a ride, how much time do you spend riding and how much time p*ssing? I quite happily did a very hilly 60 miler this weekend, 3.5 hours in the saddle, only 1 litre of water drunk, felt and rode perfectly OK.
  • manoteamanotea Posts: 1,024
    I don't think theres a definitive answer to this question. Somedays I'll ride my 30m 'loop and not need a drop, other days I'll get through a litre or more (and thats riding in the evening, not under the, er, blistering midday heat [:D]

    The only sensible approach is to ensure that you have an "adequate" supply of your favorite tipple with you. What constitutes "adequate" is something you have to work out for yourself.

    Speaking personally, I drink like a fish! I never have to stop for wee breaks tho... the water just floods out of the holes in my skin.

    Eat before you get hungry, drink before you get thirsty. Works for me![8D]
    "Put the kettle on, I\'m gaspin"
  • pmchappmchap Posts: 261
    mmm drinking without water... especially long rides is akin to putting your kidneys through a shredder and then wondering why they don't work properly. Enough research has been done to show a few things about the bodies need for water 1. if you feel thirsty - you are already dehydrated. 2. a loss of 5% fluid can make a massive loss in the performance (something around the 20% mark from memory)3. a loss of 10% of fluids can cause perminent damage to kidneys and liver 4. stop drinking for long enough and you will surely DIE!!!!
    Most trainers recommend drinking at least a mouthful for every 15 or so minutes of exercise. For me that means that I go through a large bidon in about 1.5hrs - and I don't drink as much as I should, some guys I ride with drink double that.
    Peter
  • keithpkeithp Posts: 9
    I saw a courier in london the other day doing a trackstand no handed...now how do you do that?!
  • nmcgannnmcgann Posts: 1,780
    <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Numbtie Treader</i>
    Well obviously cycling with no water is far from ideal, but people do go a bit over the top with this eating and drinking on the go business. If you neck 4 litres of water during a ride, how much time do you spend riding and how much time p*ssing? I quite happily did a very hilly 60 miler this weekend, 3.5 hours in the saddle, only 1 litre of water drunk, felt and rode perfectly OK.
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></blockquote id="quote"></font id="quote">

    I think an issue is that there is a large variation in how people use water - I hardly ever pee on a ride up to 75 miles as I sweat quite a bit, but some people have to go several times over that distance if they are drinking a lot.

    I think it's very hard to generalise about any aspect of training, people respond in different ways and at different rates to exercise so any one-size-fits-all scheme is a bit suspect.

    Neil
    --
    "Because the cycling is pain. The cycling is soul crushing pain."
  • Regards not drinking water - although I drink plenty myself - try to ensure around 500ml per hour in hot weather (as on the Brimham Rocks 200 this Sunday gone) - but weigh yourself before and after the ride - I weighed 6lbs less when I got home compared with the morning (and that's after piling food and drink in post ride).
    BUT, John Merrill (long distance walker) never drank water and walked for week on week at 25-30 miles per day with a large, heavy rucksack - his food amounted to an increasing amount of mars bars apparently - several decades and hundreds of thousands of miles of walking without water haven't done him any harm (that I know off!)

    Climbing out of the saddle - I always do - whether that be a short sharp climb out of Lincoln on my commute or the climb out of Pateley Bridge at the weekend - don't know the details but it's the one to the left of Greenhow Hill - that must be a good km or three out of the saddle - I find it easier on my knees, can put the whole body in to pushing the pedals down and pulling on the bars. Different things work better for different people - you've got to experiment and find out what works best for yourself.
  • ixus_123ixus_123 Posts: 394
    Keeping hydrated is absolutley essential. You muscles are more than 60% water - not to mention the blood that transports the oxygen to them & takes away lactic acid. If you are dehydrating you will not perform as well.

    Then ofcourse there is danger of death - sweating cools you down - we are constanly sweating even if your skin is dry to the touch. You core only needs to overheat by soemthing like 5 degrees to cause death - if you want examples just look at wrestlers in the 80's & 90's (proper wrestling not WWF etc). They would starve themselves of water to 'make weight' before a match then often keel over from heatstroke or even die in extreme cases.
  • I'm doing the M/cr 100 in September and welcome the comments regarding water intake etc. I dring like a fish, sweat like a pig and cycle like a pedestrian!

    The purpose of my post here is: I have never cycled 100 miles and would welcome any advice from you experienced mile eaters. Any tips for saddle comfort and/or pacing myself (and partners) and preparation. I am up to about 50 miles an quite hilly (Lancashire) terrain. The ride itself id around the much flatter Cheshire area.

    Also, with regard energy drinks (yes I DO need to drink!) and bars, whats best for this type of thing?
  • NervouselkNervouselk Posts: 1,071
    i dont know how you can ride over 100miles without fluid. How much lighter are you at the end of the ride than the start? I can loose close to a stone on a hard ride at high speed of around 2 hours and thats taking on a lot of water.
  • PorkyboyPorkyboy Posts: 433
    HI NT

    It's not even worth wasting time wondering about this, it's just a daft thing to do, I just can't see why anyone would consider it. It's a simple decision really, you either keep yourself as well hydrated as you can to look after your body or you just don't bother, I choose the former.

    Cheers.

    PB

    What do you mean your legs are hurting? Give it some welly man!
  • SPEEDYSPEEDY Posts: 407
    NO HANDS growing up in liverpool we would cycle from Sefton to the top of Parbold Hill, stop,(gaffitti something!) and then ride down as fast as pos with no hands.i remember a tricky bend towards the end but never came a cropper. DEAD GOOD FUN
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