Things that have withstood the test of time

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Comments

  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,479
    Comes to something when 9 year old tech is considered to be standing the test of time!
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,858
    edited February 2021
    This tech (if not the particular bike) has withstood the test of time - quite something, when you consider at this time roads were still populated fairly equally by horses and what we now call 'cars'. This is a racing bike from the 1920s


  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    edited February 2021

    This tech (if not the particular bike) has withstood the test of time - quite something, when you consider at this time roads were still populated fairly equally by horses and what we now call 'cars'. This is a racing bike from the 1920s




    I'll add to that the chain, the deraillieur and steel frames.
  • shortfall
    shortfall Posts: 3,288
    And the spoked wheel, the pneumatic tyre and rim brakes (for bikes at least)
  • Pross said:

    Comes to something when 9 year old tech is considered to be standing the test of time!

    I did think exactly that as I typed but in terms of consumer tech that seems to be the way things are, they have to sell you something new to keep making money.
  • elbowloh
    elbowloh Posts: 7,078
    ddraver said:

    Is anyone else still using a Garmin Edge 800? I'd definitely throw mine into the ring. When I try and think what other tech devices I'd have been using around that time, most of them have been comprehensively outstripped yet my little edge 800 carries on just working even though it's been dropped in streams, crashed into rocks on the MTB, ridden through years of winters etc.

    Garmin made a gem with that one...

    My edge 800 was awful and it's crappiness was a running joke amongst my cycling buddies. The 820 replacement gas been spot on though.
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • morstar
    morstar Posts: 6,190
    My bar tape has been on my bike since 2011 and is still in perfect working order.
    I’m not small and ride reasonable but not huge mileage. I have no clue how some people are so hard wearing on kit.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,479

    This tech (if not the particular bike) has withstood the test of time - quite something, when you consider at this time roads were still populated fairly equally by horses and what we now call 'cars'. This is a racing bike from the 1920s


    Should've got a bike fit though, the frame is clearly too large for whoever was riding it.
  • elbowloh
    elbowloh Posts: 7,078
    Pross said:

    This tech (if not the particular bike) has withstood the test of time - quite something, when you consider at this time roads were still populated fairly equally by horses and what we now call 'cars'. This is a racing bike from the 1920s


    Should've got a bike fit though, the frame is clearly too large for whoever was riding it.
    I think they could have found something other than sausages for tyres.
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • tetley10
    tetley10 Posts: 693
    Left the pump on for the pic as well.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,624
    That saddle looks remarkably similar to a Brooks.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,385
    Pross said:

    Comes to something when 9 year old tech is considered to be standing the test of time!

    It is, but if you think that when I bought it I had a dumb phone and later upgraded to a HTC Desire later that year, it gives you some idea of what has changed in the 'tech world' in that 9 years...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • me-109
    me-109 Posts: 1,915
    Stonehenge. Machu Pichu. Pyramids (bloody big stone ones, not just the shape).
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    Faster than a tent.......
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,858
    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!


    A 'green' leaf-blower. Way ahead of its time. There might be a market for them again...
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,624
    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • elbowloh
    elbowloh Posts: 7,078
    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    You spin me round, round
    baby right round.
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • rick_chasey
    rick_chasey Posts: 72,585
    The allure of populism.
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,385
    elbowloh said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    You spin me round, round
    baby right round.
    Arguably that has stood the test of time much better than it's creator....
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    That ultimate middle class shame - I have an open fire and a few times a year I burn coalite on it! It is excellent for that as coalite can be hard work to get going.

    Faster than a tent.......
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,624
    edited February 2021
    rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    That ultimate middle class shame - I have an open fire and a few times a year I burn coalite on it! It is excellent for that as coalite can be hard work to get going.

    Oh, Rolf! Do you use your environmental principles as firelighters? 😁
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • step83
    step83 Posts: 4,170
    edited February 2021




    My great great grandfathers try square ebony and brass with a hot dipped steel thing I can't recall the name of.
    Great great grandfather was a carpenter still has his initials etched into the wood. I use it a lot as, well it's a try square you have to be doing something very wrong to break it.
    Slowly cleaning it up when I get time.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,624
    step83 said:





    My great great grandfathers try square ebony and brass with a hot dipped steel thing I can't recall the name of.
    Great great grandfather was a carpenter still has his initials etched into the wood. I use it a lot as, well it's a try square you have to be doing something very wrong to break it.
    Slowly cleaning it up when I get time.

    That is beautiful. I have a similar one but much smaller and more battered. I also have a matching mortice gauge like this.

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Vintage-Marple-s-and-sons-Mortice-gauge-Rosewood-and-brass-in-good-condition-/402663428395?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=710-134428-41853-0&mkcid=2&itemid=402663428395&targetid=1140014333422&device=m&mktype=pla&googleloc=9045859&campaignid=12126078228&mkgroupid=116304581749&rlsatarget=pla-1140014333422&abcId=9300480&merchantid=6995734&gclid=CjwKCAiAyc2BBhAaEiwA44-wW1Vkzx91Tb9yrNC90ChtxQcRPCS0d29LTdjKC1CpRoYek9yU0pe9pRoC618QAvD_BwE&pageci=965b292d-5b20-4b0c-88fd-ec643a6df022
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • step83
    step83 Posts: 4,170
    I do like old tools like these, they just work, I have an old bailey 4 1/2" plane to restore again his but it's in bad condition, that's a bit more recent 1910-1913 going on its markings.

    That mortice is lovely struggle to get anything near thY quality now
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,385
    (not sure it counts, but everything I've got from Park Tool is exceptional, everything else...not so much)
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    That ultimate middle class shame - I have an open fire and a few times a year I burn coalite on it! It is excellent for that as coalite can be hard work to get going.

    Oh, Rolf! Do you use your environmental principles as firelighters? 😁
    No, I have packets of endangered species for that! The recent reporting fails the basic test of considering the rate of usage rather than just the usage itself. I suspect many people who don't rely on their open fire as the sole source of heating use it fairly infrequently. In my case maybe four or five times so far this winter. The recent Lancaster Uni paper talked about the particulate matter equating to that on a heavily trafficked road but referred to the fire being used for half the year.

    Exposure to PM, and to strongly magnetic airborne PM, can be greater for individuals spending ~5 h/day indoors with a coal-burning open fire for 6 months/year compared to those commuting via heavily-trafficked roads for 1 h/day for 12 months/year.

    Faster than a tent.......
  • rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    That ultimate middle class shame - I have an open fire and a few times a year I burn coalite on it! It is excellent for that as coalite can be hard work to get going.

    Oh, Rolf! Do you use your environmental principles as firelighters? 😁
    No, I have packets of endangered species for that! The recent reporting fails the basic test of considering the rate of usage rather than just the usage itself. I suspect many people who don't rely on their open fire as the sole source of heating use it fairly infrequently. In my case maybe four or five times so far this winter. The recent Lancaster Uni paper talked about the particulate matter equating to that on a heavily trafficked road but referred to the fire being used for half the year.

    Exposure to PM, and to strongly magnetic airborne PM, can be greater for individuals spending ~5 h/day indoors with a coal-burning open fire for 6 months/year compared to those commuting via heavily-trafficked roads for 1 h/day for 12 months/year.

    get yourself a log burning stove then all the particles are outside
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015

    rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    rjsterry said:

    rolf_f said:

    pangolin said:

    rolf_f said:

    Most of the stuff in my house would be appropriate for this thread apart from the kitchen appliances and digital cameras. I rarely buy anything new and never replace things unless they break. Here is my 1913 Gibson A4 mandolin and an item that was ancient when the mandolin was new. Both get regular use in the way the makers intended (at least if Gibson intended their mandolins to be played badly....). The only thing in the shot that isn't really old is the only thing that was pretending to be old when it was new - the little drawer unit. The other stuff was bang up to date when it came out.

    Is that a hand crank bellows?
    Technically it is a peat bellows - not much info on line about them but associated with Westmoreland and Ireland in the 18th and 19th centuries. Would have been made on site for a big house using proprietary castings from a catalogue.
    Mine is rather cool. Most use an 8 or ten inch crank wheel driving a one inch pinion on the turbine shaft. Mine goes 8:1 then 4:1 so a mechanical advantage of 1:32. It's awesome to use; way better than conventional bellows (I suspect they died out just on the grounds of expense to make). It is a Georgian supercharger!

    While anything with gears and wheels is good, can I ask what you use it for? You obviously don't burn peat.
    That ultimate middle class shame - I have an open fire and a few times a year I burn coalite on it! It is excellent for that as coalite can be hard work to get going.

    Oh, Rolf! Do you use your environmental principles as firelighters? 😁
    No, I have packets of endangered species for that! The recent reporting fails the basic test of considering the rate of usage rather than just the usage itself. I suspect many people who don't rely on their open fire as the sole source of heating use it fairly infrequently. In my case maybe four or five times so far this winter. The recent Lancaster Uni paper talked about the particulate matter equating to that on a heavily trafficked road but referred to the fire being used for half the year.

    Exposure to PM, and to strongly magnetic airborne PM, can be greater for individuals spending ~5 h/day indoors with a coal-burning open fire for 6 months/year compared to those commuting via heavily-trafficked roads for 1 h/day for 12 months/year.

    get yourself a log burning stove then all the particles are outside
    I'll take my particulates as they are - 5 days fire use a year works out about equivalent to 5 hours of commuting in heavy traffic. I can live (or die) with that!

    Faster than a tent.......
  • edward.s
    edward.s Posts: 219
    edited February 2021
    My 1916 Drummond model B metal lathe. 105 years old and still going strong. Not a tool I use every day but when you need it, you need it.