Nostalgia Thread

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  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,750

    The old nostalgia threads used to be much better than this one

    The memory of making that point on page 1. 😉
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • johngti
    johngti Posts: 2,508
    elbowloh said:

    People using common sense to determine if something was fit to eat or had gone.
    Not slavishly following sell by or best by dates.

    Does anyone slavishly follow best by dates?
    Oh yes, in the Gti household its almost a religion.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,866
    secretsam said:

    You were born either boy or girl and that was the way you stayed.

    Good, old-fashioned bigotry and intolerance.

    That ought to be in the anti nostalgia thread. When I bring to young people's attention some of the attitudes that were considered acceptable, or even just 'normal' their jaws often drop. It's refreshing to realise how far we've come that they have so little perception of how intolerant society was just a generation or two ago.
  • ballysmate
    ballysmate Posts: 15,921
    secretsam said:

    You were born either boy or girl and that was the way you stayed.

    Good, old-fashioned bigotry and intolerance.

    You reckon?

    If I can assume for the sake of argument that when Sam was born, the midwife slapped baby's ar5e and said, "Congratulations Ms Secret, you have a beautiful baby boy" Sometimes but rarely do they get it wrong but a test would confirm the presence of XY or XX chromosomes.

    As baby Sam grows up into an adult they are free to live any lifestyle they choose. They can consider themselves whatever they want, man, woman or even decide each morning how they are going to live on that day. I don't care. But the defining chromosomes haven't changed.

    People will no doubt have differing view on when a person can be judged to have changed sex. Some will say it is when they have self defined. Some may claim it is post hormonal therapy and some will say that it is post surgery. You may claim that it is when someone has self defined and therefore consider everyone who waits until the person has had surgery before they grant recognition to be bigoted. Everyone will draw the line in a different place. Some may claim, like myself, that until they can change chromosomes, they have not changed sex.
    Even people that have transitioned prefix their gender with the word 'trans' because they recognise that full sex change is impossible, however they appear physically.

    Out of curiosity, where would you draw the line of demarcation? Self identification, post hormonal therapy, post surgery or somewhere else?

    You obviously consider where I draw the line to be bigoted, so be it, I draw the line at a different place to you.
    Intolerant? I have stated that people should be able to lead whatever lifestyle they lead, so that is hardly intolerant.

  • pangolin
    pangolin Posts: 6,314
    "I don't care", he* declares mid essay.

    I miss the good old days when people owned their intolerance.

    *Sorry I should say they declare, don't want to assume.
    - Genesis Croix de Fer
    - Dolan Tuono
  • ballysmate
    ballysmate Posts: 15,921
    pangolin said:

    "I don't care", he* declares mid essay.

    I miss the good old days when people owned their intolerance.

    *Sorry I should say they declare, don't want to assume.

    Why should I care?
    Out of curiosity at which point do you consider someone to have changed sex?
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,638

    secretsam said:

    You were born either boy or girl and that was the way you stayed.

    Good, old-fashioned bigotry and intolerance.

    You reckon?

    If I can assume for the sake of argument that when Sam was born, the midwife slapped baby's ar5e and said, "Congratulations Ms Secret, you have a beautiful baby boy" Sometimes but rarely do they get it wrong but a test would confirm the presence of XY or XX chromosomes.

    As baby Sam grows up into an adult they are free to live any lifestyle they choose. They can consider themselves whatever they want, man, woman or even decide each morning how they are going to live on that day. I don't care. But the defining chromosomes haven't changed.

    People will no doubt have differing view on when a person can be judged to have changed sex. Some will say it is when they have self defined. Some may claim it is post hormonal therapy and some will say that it is post surgery. You may claim that it is when someone has self defined and therefore consider everyone who waits until the person has had surgery before they grant recognition to be bigoted. Everyone will draw the line in a different place. Some may claim, like myself, that until they can change chromosomes, they have not changed sex.
    Even people that have transitioned prefix their gender with the word 'trans' because they recognise that full sex change is impossible, however they appear physically.

    Out of curiosity, where would you draw the line of demarcation? Self identification, post hormonal therapy, post surgery or somewhere else?

    You obviously consider where I draw the line to be bigoted, so be it, I draw the line at a different place to you.
    Intolerant? I have stated that people should be able to lead whatever lifestyle they lead, so that is hardly intolerant.

    FWIW, there's a reason why it is referred to as transgender, rather than trans-sex. As you point out, one is down to chromosomes, the other less so.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • ballysmate
    ballysmate Posts: 15,921
    rjsterry said:

    secretsam said:

    You were born either boy or girl and that was the way you stayed.

    Good, old-fashioned bigotry and intolerance.

    You reckon?

    If I can assume for the sake of argument that when Sam was born, the midwife slapped baby's ar5e and said, "Congratulations Ms Secret, you have a beautiful baby boy" Sometimes but rarely do they get it wrong but a test would confirm the presence of XY or XX chromosomes.

    As baby Sam grows up into an adult they are free to live any lifestyle they choose. They can consider themselves whatever they want, man, woman or even decide each morning how they are going to live on that day. I don't care. But the defining chromosomes haven't changed.

    People will no doubt have differing view on when a person can be judged to have changed sex. Some will say it is when they have self defined. Some may claim it is post hormonal therapy and some will say that it is post surgery. You may claim that it is when someone has self defined and therefore consider everyone who waits until the person has had surgery before they grant recognition to be bigoted. Everyone will draw the line in a different place. Some may claim, like myself, that until they can change chromosomes, they have not changed sex.
    Even people that have transitioned prefix their gender with the word 'trans' because they recognise that full sex change is impossible, however they appear physically.

    Out of curiosity, where would you draw the line of demarcation? Self identification, post hormonal therapy, post surgery or somewhere else?

    You obviously consider where I draw the line to be bigoted, so be it, I draw the line at a different place to you.
    Intolerant? I have stated that people should be able to lead whatever lifestyle they lead, so that is hardly intolerant.

    FWIW, there's a reason why it is referred to as transgender, rather than trans-sex. As you point out, one is down to chromosomes, the other less so.
    You are correct. People who don't identify with their birth gender consider themselves transgender.
    Transsexual usually refers to those that involve medical changes.

  • pangolin
    pangolin Posts: 6,314

    pangolin said:

    "I don't care", he* declares mid essay.

    I miss the good old days when people owned their intolerance.

    *Sorry I should say they declare, don't want to assume.

    Why should I care?
    Out of curiosity at which point do you consider someone to have changed sex?
    Not given it much thought really. In so much as it affects me, I guess I'd be happy to refer to them as they want, regardless of stage (that has happened at work actually now I think about it, no problems there). I'd expect them to be fairly good natured about honest mistakes, but that's never come up so we're into hypotheticals.
    - Genesis Croix de Fer
    - Dolan Tuono
  • Television adverts that were not tedious, in fact very good and quotable in some cases.
    PG Tips series, Tour de France and Mr Shifter stand out for me [money well spent]
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,750

    Television adverts that were not tedious, in fact very good and quotable in some cases.
    PG Tips series, Tour de France and Mr Shifter stand out for me [money well spent]

    Smash.
    Terrible stuff, funny ads.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,866

    Television adverts that were not tedious, in fact very good and quotable in some cases.
    PG Tips series, Tour de France and Mr Shifter stand out for me [money well spent]


    Not forgetting Hamlet cigars...

    https://youtu.be/tE9cGM5IxUI

  • Patrick Moore and The Sky at Night, but especially Patrick Moore and his infectious enthusiasm
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,638

    Patrick Moore and The Sky at Night, but especially Patrick Moore and his infectious enthusiasm

    TBF, Maggie Aderin-Pocock puts in a pretty strong effort on the infectious enthusiasm.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098


    Why should I care?
    Out of curiosity at which point do you consider someone to have changed sex?

    When they decide that's what they want?

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,638
    Not quite nostalgia as they are still very much around, but maps - proper paper OS ones. Google Maps is great for urban areas, but anything even vaguely rural and you just have a load of identical green blobs.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,490
    I spend hours going over my OS maps looking for trail running routes and now gravel routes.
    The OS website is great too, I pay a fairly small annual fee and can plot off maps at 1:25000 for any part of the country with or without a proposed route and waypoint info. It's excellent for planning navigation for long fell races and saves taking the full map on my run.

    The app also helps you locate your position quicker than using a compass (less "manly" of course though).
  • capt_slog
    capt_slog Posts: 3,946
    I don't know what reminded me, but last night I thought about the Kung Fu TV series starring David Carradine. It was one of my favourites as a kid.

    I once did the 'picking up the burning brazier with the forearms' thing with something at work (not hot!) to be met with blank stares. It was such a part of my youth, I was surprised that it was so specific to just a narrow age-group. :)


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,866
    rjsterry said:

    Not quite nostalgia as they are still very much around, but maps - proper paper OS ones. Google Maps is great for urban areas, but anything even vaguely rural and you just have a load of identical green blobs.


    Yes, paper maps are a joy and things of beauty. And OS is still unbeaten for the mixture of clarity and detail.

    OK, yes I do access them online too, but there's no beating spreading a whole map out on a big table, and planning a good day's cycling or walking route, then returning to the map in the evening to work out stuff that you've seen during the day.
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674

    rjsterry said:

    Not quite nostalgia as they are still very much around, but maps - proper paper OS ones. Google Maps is great for urban areas, but anything even vaguely rural and you just have a load of identical green blobs.


    Yes, paper maps are a joy and things of beauty. And OS is still unbeaten for the mixture of clarity and detail.

    OK, yes I do access them online too, but there's no beating spreading a whole map out on a big table, and planning a good day's cycling or walking route, then returning to the map in the evening to work out stuff that you've seen during the day.
    I love maps. Just to look at a map is to adventure.

    Here's a bit of my commute:

  • rjsterry
    rjsterry Posts: 27,638
    I swear the Scots just make up words. What on earth is a Glack?
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Part of the anti-growth coalition
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    rjsterry said:

    I swear the Scots just make up words. What on earth is a Glack?

    It's an old Scots word for "hill that is far, far longer, steeper and harder than it appears to be on the map"
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    Personally I like Pitnappie, which is an old Scots word for "hill that leaves something at the bottom of your pants"
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    And the farm at Millhole, which always impinges faintly on my consciousness as "Hellhole" as I struggle past
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,490
    I started doing a bit of fell running a couple of years ago and it's great fun on longer races to look at the maps beforehand to plan your route. I'm quite good at reading a map and interpretting features but I do still struggle with converting the map into real world scale and find that distances always end up being further than they are in my head. Also, the reality of what is defined as a path on a map and the reality on the ground is interesting (even more so when I've tried planning some gravel rides recntly). If you subscribe to the OS online mapping you can create a route and then run it as a 3D fly through rendered with the aerial mapping.
  • bompington
    bompington Posts: 7,674
    edited March 2021
    Pross said:

    OS online mapping you can create a route and then run it as a 3D fly through rendered with the aerial mapping.

    Ah yes, traditional maps indeed ;)

    Actually the 3D map thing is a valuable learning tool: I can still remember the enormous difference it made to explaining contours, something that kids often really struggle to get, when I first showed them a 3D rendered map in plan and then spun round to elevation view.
  • Charlie_Croker
    Charlie_Croker Posts: 1,698
    Looking for something totally unrelated I came across this,

    https://youtu.be/o6zNwBTLSWU

    This particular episode was made/broadcast before I was born so I'm fairly sure I've never seen it before. But I do remember them fondly

    I’ll own up to enjoying watching it ;) arrr splob-a-lob
  • blazing_saddles
    blazing_saddles Posts: 21,812
    edited March 2021

    Looking for something totally unrelated I came across this,

    https://youtu.be/o6zNwBTLSWU

    This particular episode was made/broadcast before I was born so I'm fairly sure I've never seen it before. But I do remember them fondly

    I’ll own up to enjoying watching it ;) arrr splob-a-lob



    Ah, fond memories. They don't make 'em like that any more!

    Nowadays they'd probably cause a twitter storm over lacking diversity and sexist attitudes for casting a female voice as little weed and having two flower pot men, rather than flower pot people.
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    I think racism in high places isn't what it used to be

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • ballysmate
    ballysmate Posts: 15,921
    Getting an appointment to see an actual GP on the day rather than a phone call in 3 weeks time.
    Also, am I the only one on here who can remember home visits by a doctor?