Forum home Road cycling forum The cake stop

A Mental Health Thread

chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
edited September 2019 in The cake stop
There is a thread in the training part of this forum which i didn't want to hijack so thought i might start one here as a place for people to talk about their own struggles and successes with mental health.

I have struggled with various mental health issues pretty much my whole life and have been to see many GPs over the years (although i did leave things too late and should have gone much earlier than I did). I usually went with one thing at a time and have been, perhaps wrongly, diagnosed with OCD, General Anxiety Disorder, a pretty weird and niche eating disorder (all based around numbers and balancing things) and some other minor stuff to boot. A doctor once told me that anxiety disorders do like to hunt in packs!

I have recently been struggling again and went to see my GP and explained everything in one go and She has refereed me for a diagnosis for Autism.

Having now read up on it everything is making sense - finally! i say they make sense, i don't know what it means yet but the dots are finally getting connected.

I do not know how i, or anyone else for that matter, didn't spot it sooner - I was painfully shy as a child, struggled in social situations, i had friends but anyone outside of them and i'd freeze pretty much. double maths A-Level followed by a maths degree and know an analyst, obsessed with technology and numbers - i enjoy cycling tech almost as much as actual cycling sometimes!

Over the years i have lost contact with countless friends, lost girlfriends as a result and i believe it is all due to being treated for the wrong things and in the wrong way.

i am really hoping that this diagnosis will point me in the direction of the help my condition (if it is a condition?!) needs and i can work out what this means for me going forward. There was an interesting article on the BBC website recently about autism and anorexia and there was this quote:

"If you don't know somebody is autistic, it becomes quite hard to help them and to adapt treatment to being autistic,"

I feel this may have been the case for me over the years.
www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
«134

Posts

  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    doesnt sound much wrong with you, there are loads of shy bike nerds on here. most of them have never had a girlfriend so even losing them makes you more successful than them.

    im with you on the Bike Tech btw.
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    doesnt sound much wrong with you, there are loads of shy bike nerds on here. most of them have never had a girlfriend so even losing them makes you more successful than them.

    im with you on the Bike Tech btw.

    haha - thanks! I prefer geek to nerd though :D
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • With hindsight I realised my old man is quite autistic and older brother a bit. His mate Andy is glowing on the spectrum and he and I get on very well, I have even taught my wife to understand him and not get offended. One example is that if you want an honest answer ask Andy.

    A bit rambling but hopefully you can take something from it as none of them have ever been diagnosed
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    Sounds quite like me! I've been told I tell people what they need to hear but maybe not what they want to hear!
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Chris Bass wrote:
    Sounds quite like me! I've been told I tell people what they need to hear but maybe not what they want to hear!

    Just remembered my old man has chronic OCD. I pointed it out to him and he had no idea what it was so I told how David Beckham has all his cans with the labels facing outwards. He looked at me bemused and asked what other way is there. My Mother has the opposite of OCD could not stop laughing.

    I could tell you about the day the father of the bride asked Andy how he thought the day had gone :shock:

    Anyway these people (and those around them) have lived with it all their lives. There are many positives and to my family it is just the way things are.
  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    Chris Bass wrote:
    Sounds quite like me! I've been told I tell people what they need to hear but maybe not what they want to hear!

    Just remembered my old man has chronic OCD. I pointed it out to him and he had no idea what it was so I told how David Beckham has all his cans with the labels facing outwards. He looked at me bemused and asked what other way is there. My Mother has the opposite of OCD could not stop laughing.

    I could tell you about the day the father of the bride asked Andy how he thought the day had gone :shock:

    Anyway these people (and those around them) have lived with it all their lives. There are many positives and to my family it is just the way things are.

    I imagine you’re on a spectrum or two
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,655
    While not Autistic I get the utter relief or a diagnosis. For years I struggled with what was labelled over and over as depression, anxiety or mood swings. Finally after about five years of referrals etc I was diagnosed as Type 2 bipolar.

    Its daft how much relief having a label gives you, makes you feel like your not actually going mad an its not just in your head, well it is but your not just imagining there's something not right.

    I get the whole obsessing over cycling tech, it gives you a focus you can shut everything else out on (BPD2 is very much about that), an actually cycling feels like freedom from what ever is bouncing round in your head.
  • Chris Bass wrote:
    Sounds quite like me! I've been told I tell people what they need to hear but maybe not what they want to hear!

    Just remembered my old man has chronic OCD. I pointed it out to him and he had no idea what it was so I told how David Beckham has all his cans with the labels facing outwards. He looked at me bemused and asked what other way is there. My Mother has the opposite of OCD could not stop laughing.

    I could tell you about the day the father of the bride asked Andy how he thought the day had gone :shock:

    Anyway these people (and those around them) have lived with it all their lives. There are many positives and to my family it is just the way things are.

    I imagine you’re on a spectrum or two

    You don’t understand the concept of a spectrum
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,299 Lives Here
    step83 wrote:
    Its daft how much relief having a label gives you, makes you feel like your not actually going mad an its not just in your head, well it is but your not just imagining there's something not right.
    I completely understand that. It gives you direction and something to focus on.
    My daughter has been suffering with what they are now labelling as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, initially she was just being told it was a post viral thing and she'd get over it, the implication was it was all in her head. The paediatrician we were seeing was little help. Eventually we paid to see a private specialist, she gave her (and us) what sounded like a reasonable explanation of the causes of it and recommended a few things to do. She immediately improved becasue she felt someone believed her and could see a way forward. It's been a long three years and she isn't 100%, but she's nearly there.
    On a completely different level being diagnosed with Lymphoma was a kind of relief because I knew something was wrong and there was then a known course of action so I could start to get better.

    Anyway, pleased to hear you have some direction and all the best CB. Nothing wrong with obsessing about bike bits, that's hardly unusual around here. Not saying this place is representative of the population at large of course. There's Piña and the MFs for a start.
  • WheelspinnerWheelspinner Posts: 4,639
    I'm of the view that the accepted definitions of what's normal for personality and behaviour are ridiculously narrow in scope. IMHO, a bunch of slightly different habits are too easily bunched together, given a name, and commercialised by a medical profession keen to find new ways to fund the ski chalets in Gstaad.

    The identification of what your particular "personality disorder" is may well be very helpful as Step83 says, but with the possible exception of psychopathic serial killers, they're mostly a (sometimes distinctly) different version of normal, just not a common one.

    Different is good. It's the only thing that makes the world an interesting place.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,832
    I'm of the view that the accepted definitions of what's normal for personality and behaviour are ridiculously narrow in scope. IMHO, a bunch of slightly different habits are too easily bunched together, given a name, and commercialised by a medical profession keen to find new ways to fund the ski chalets in Gstaad.

    The identification of what your particular "personality disorder" is may well be very helpful as Step83 says, but with the possible exception of psychopathic serial killers, they're mostly a (sometimes distinctly) different version of normal, just not a common one.

    Different is good. It's the only thing that makes the world an interesting place.

    I have some sympathy with avoidance of excessive categorisation but while different is great for some, I think the range of people for whom that difference is harmful is a bit wider than just psychopaths.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    rjsterry wrote:
    I'm of the view that the accepted definitions of what's normal for personality and behaviour are ridiculously narrow in scope. IMHO, a bunch of slightly different habits are too easily bunched together, given a name, and commercialised by a medical profession keen to find new ways to fund the ski chalets in Gstaad.

    The identification of what your particular "personality disorder" is may well be very helpful as Step83 says, but with the possible exception of psychopathic serial killers, they're mostly a (sometimes distinctly) different version of normal, just not a common one.

    Different is good. It's the only thing that makes the world an interesting place.

    I have some sympathy with avoidance of excessive categorisation but while different is great for some, I think the range of people for whom that difference is harmful is a bit wider than just psychopaths.

    That’s because you’re judgemental and believe yourself superior whilst simultaneously demonstrating that you’re actually barely average.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,706
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    I think everyone has these traits or quirks and oddities in their personalities it is when they rule your life that they become a disorder.

    I have cancelled plans with friends and family because it doesn't fit into my "safe" routine. I have lost friends and broken relationships because I didn't know I was annoying or offending someone and they didn't know I didn't know (if that makes sense) so thought I was just being intentionally difficult.

    This is unlikely to change but if I make people aware of this they can point it out when it happens and j can learn to work around it.
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • ProssPross Posts: 22,116
    rjsterry wrote:
    I'm of the view that the accepted definitions of what's normal for personality and behaviour are ridiculously narrow in scope. IMHO, a bunch of slightly different habits are too easily bunched together, given a name, and commercialised by a medical profession keen to find new ways to fund the ski chalets in Gstaad.

    The identification of what your particular "personality disorder" is may well be very helpful as Step83 says, but with the possible exception of psychopathic serial killers, they're mostly a (sometimes distinctly) different version of normal, just not a common one.

    Different is good. It's the only thing that makes the world an interesting place.

    I have some sympathy with avoidance of excessive categorisation but while different is great for some, I think the range of people for whom that difference is harmful is a bit wider than just psychopaths.

    That’s because you’re judgemental and believe yourself superior whilst simultaneously demonstrating that you’re actually barely average.

    There's plenty of threads for you to troll on (and you do). Surely this one should be left for a bit more serious discussion as it's a serious issue that doesn't get discussed as much as it needs to.
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    Taking this back to the OP (although not sure this exactly relates to 'mental health')...

    It was only with the diagnosis of my son (who is autistic in a very classic and obvious way) that my wife came to the realisation that she was autistic and this explained a huge amount around the struggles that she has had in life.

    As a tech guy, computer scientist and shy extrovert I'd always imagined myself somewhere on the spectrum but luckily autistic behaviour is pretty much expected of someone in my line of work, so it has never really created any particular challenges for me - if anything I suspect I am the more neurotypical of the three of us.

    Cycling is a very popular sport/hobby for the autistic. There is often a fundemental desire for motion (although the opposite can be true...), and a taste for repetitive actions/motion (ie pedalling), then there are the opportunities to chat/be social outside of normal expectations and conventions - so there is no expectation of making eye contact when you chat to someone on the club run, and people aren't offended if you ignore them or take a while to respond (because you're dodging a pothole or whatever else) etc.

    Certainly there's a guy in our club who is sociable enough but at the cafe stop is incapable of looking you in the eye, although that in isolation doesn't mean autism - I do sometimes wonder if he is aware/diagnosed.
  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    Pross wrote:
    rjsterry wrote:
    I'm of the view that the accepted definitions of what's normal for personality and behaviour are ridiculously narrow in scope. IMHO, a bunch of slightly different habits are too easily bunched together, given a name, and commercialised by a medical profession keen to find new ways to fund the ski chalets in Gstaad.

    The identification of what your particular "personality disorder" is may well be very helpful as Step83 says, but with the possible exception of psychopathic serial killers, they're mostly a (sometimes distinctly) different version of normal, just not a common one.

    Different is good. It's the only thing that makes the world an interesting place.

    I have some sympathy with avoidance of excessive categorisation but while different is great for some, I think the range of people for whom that difference is harmful is a bit wider than just psychopaths.

    That’s because you’re judgemental and believe yourself superior whilst simultaneously demonstrating that you’re actually barely average.

    There's plenty of threads for you to troll on (and you do). Surely this one should be left for a bit more serious discussion as it's a serious issue that doesn't get discussed as much as it needs to.

    it was an observation not a troll.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,832
    Thanks for the assessment. I'll bear it in mind.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • john80john80 Posts: 828
    robert88 wrote:
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.

    This would be true if you wanted to live a live of abject depression blaming everyone else for your perceived issues. Honestly I failed that exam because the other students were mean or the teacher was rubbish. If the above is true then what is the answer. Capitulate to every person that has a problem they wish to claim is related to mental health. Not sure the NHS has got the funds for this widespread navel gazing.
  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    john80 wrote:
    robert88 wrote:
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.

    This would be true if you wanted to live a live of abject depression blaming everyone else for your perceived issues. Honestly I failed that exam because the other students were mean or the teacher was rubbish. If the above is true then what is the answer. Capitulate to every person that has a problem they wish to claim is related to mental health. Not sure the NHS has got the funds for this widespread navel gazing.

    theres a lot of truth in that, though i have a lot of sympathy for serious illness. Life is tough people struggle with all sorts of different things some mental, some physical some just because theyre not good enough or dont apply themselves enough. there comes a point where liberal doo gooding does more damage than good. I think we're there as a society

    That said mental health is a serious issue.
  • AlejandrosdogAlejandrosdog Posts: 2,007
    rjsterry wrote:
    Thanks for the assessment. I'll bear it in mind.

    Amply demonstrated.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 3,313
    I regard autism as more of a description than a mental health condition. Like "short" or "homosexual". Its just how you are.

    It is certainly helpful for an understanding of your own or someone else's personality, but I'm not sure labeling anything that doesn't fit into what is a currently accepted norm as being a "mental health condition", particularly if it can't be "treated".
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,832
    rjsterry wrote:
    Thanks for the assessment. I'll bear it in mind.

    Amply demonstrated.

    It's a surprise that my own family tolerate my company. I'm under no illusions.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • mamil314mamil314 Posts: 1,103
    Don't you worry about the NHS, soon they will be getting extra 300 mil a week.

    OP thanks for posting, mental health is a topic often shied away from.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 16,832
    I regard autism as more of a description than a mental health condition. Like "short" or "homosexual". Its just how you are.

    It is certainly helpful for an understanding of your own or someone else's personality, but I'm not sure labeling anything that doesn't fit into what is a currently accepted norm as being a "mental health condition", particularly if it can't be "treated".

    Isn't this what CB was saying?
    I think everyone has these traits or quirks and oddities in their personalities it is when they rule your life that they become a disorder.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    1980s BSA 10sp

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • awaveyawavey Posts: 2,368
    timothyw wrote:
    Taking this back to the OP (although not sure this exactly relates to 'mental health')...

    It was only with the diagnosis of my son (who is autistic in a very classic and obvious way) that my wife came to the realisation that she was autistic and this explained a huge amount around the struggles that she has had in life.

    As a tech guy, computer scientist and shy extrovert I'd always imagined myself somewhere on the spectrum but luckily autistic behaviour is pretty much expected of someone in my line of work, so it has never really created any particular challenges for me - if anything I suspect I am the more neurotypical of the three of us.

    Cycling is a very popular sport/hobby for the autistic. There is often a fundemental desire for motion (although the opposite can be true...), and a taste for repetitive actions/motion (ie pedalling), then there are the opportunities to chat/be social outside of normal expectations and conventions - so there is no expectation of making eye contact when you chat to someone on the club run, and people aren't offended if you ignore them or take a while to respond (because you're dodging a pothole or whatever else) etc.

    Certainly there's a guy in our club who is sociable enough but at the cafe stop is incapable of looking you in the eye, although that in isolation doesn't mean autism - I do sometimes wonder if he is aware/diagnosed.

    but that's the problem with labelling mental health like this, it needn't be autism at all, yet because it matches a few traits of someone you know who has been told they are autistic you assume that must be what it is.

    Ive worked in computer IT all my life, encountered many autistic people across the wide spectrum, some are self aware of their condition, others are just completely cut off from any social skills at all and can be challenging to work with.

    but I could easily name several traits in me, that presented by themselves in isolation like I like routine,I like to have my CDs or books stored alphabetically,Im good with numbers or complicated structures, shy in social groups, people would go oh yeah classic autism signs, shes autistic.

    But Im not and would never consider myself to be autistic or anywhere much on the spectrum,I like routine because I can be quite forgetful at times and its easier to remember things if you do them everyday, my cds and books are ordered because its just easier to find things when Im looking for specific books I want to read or cds to listen too, Im good manipulating numbers and structures just because I can break them down into chunks I understand, I was totally rubbish at maths at school, especially pure maths. and Im not actually shy because I find social groups & interaction awkward, Im very adept and would score highly on the empathy/emotional social interaction stuff,I pick up social cues way too much for my own good sometimes, but Im considered "shy/quiet" because I dont have an extrovert personality to go with it.
  • hopkinbhopkinb Posts: 5,430
    john80 wrote:
    robert88 wrote:
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.

    This would be true if you wanted to live a live of abject depression blaming everyone else for your perceived issues. Honestly I failed that exam because the other students were mean or the teacher was rubbish. If the above is true then what is the answer. Capitulate to every person that has a problem they wish to claim is related to mental health. Not sure the NHS has got the funds for this widespread navel gazing.

    Mental health issues are "navel gazing"? People kill themselves, people harm themselves, people ruin their own lives and the lives of others due to addiction, act compulsively, or are unable to function normally in society due to crippling anxiety. All because they are a bit sad, or failed an exam, or because someone was mean to them, or because they want to get some extra benefits. Obviously all they need to do is pull themselves up by the bootstraps eh? Give themselves a bit of a talking to. Just like john80, because he's OK. He knows what to do. The University of Life, and the school of hard knocks taught him everything he needs to know. Everyone should be like him.

    Mental health issues are very often brought on by the abusive behaviour of others, very often in childhood, very often repeated generationally.

    Thoughtless bullsh!t about "navel gazing" and the assumption that people seek to blame others, or want to receive some kind of financial gain for their "perceived issues" is why mental health problems are not taken seriously. The fact that you even use the phrase "perceived issues" is instructive. You think they should be OK, so that's the end of the discussion. You have literally not a fcuking clue about mental health, or how it impacts lives, or you wouldn't have written such a load of knee-jerk drivel. And if you do have somone in your life who suffers with mental health problems, and you still wrote that, then you're a monster.
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    awavey wrote:
    timothyw wrote:
    Taking this back to the OP (although not sure this exactly relates to 'mental health')...

    It was only with the diagnosis of my son (who is autistic in a very classic and obvious way) that my wife came to the realisation that she was autistic and this explained a huge amount around the struggles that she has had in life.

    As a tech guy, computer scientist and shy extrovert I'd always imagined myself somewhere on the spectrum but luckily autistic behaviour is pretty much expected of someone in my line of work, so it has never really created any particular challenges for me - if anything I suspect I am the more neurotypical of the three of us.

    Cycling is a very popular sport/hobby for the autistic. There is often a fundemental desire for motion (although the opposite can be true...), and a taste for repetitive actions/motion (ie pedalling), then there are the opportunities to chat/be social outside of normal expectations and conventions - so there is no expectation of making eye contact when you chat to someone on the club run, and people aren't offended if you ignore them or take a while to respond (because you're dodging a pothole or whatever else) etc.

    Certainly there's a guy in our club who is sociable enough but at the cafe stop is incapable of looking you in the eye, although that in isolation doesn't mean autism - I do sometimes wonder if he is aware/diagnosed.

    but that's the problem with labelling mental health like this, it needn't be autism at all, yet because it matches a few traits of someone you know who has been told they are autistic you assume that must be what it is.

    Ive worked in computer IT all my life, encountered many autistic people across the wide spectrum, some are self aware of their condition, others are just completely cut off from any social skills at all and can be challenging to work with.

    but I could easily name several traits in me, that presented by themselves in isolation like I like routine,I like to have my CDs or books stored alphabetically,Im good with numbers or complicated structures, shy in social groups, people would go oh yeah classic autism signs, shes autistic.

    But Im not and would never consider myself to be autistic or anywhere much on the spectrum,I like routine because I can be quite forgetful at times and its easier to remember things if you do them everyday, my cds and books are ordered because its just easier to find things when Im looking for specific books I want to read or cds to listen too, Im good manipulating numbers and structures just because I can break them down into chunks I understand, I was totally rubbish at maths at school, especially pure maths. and Im not actually shy because I find social groups & interaction awkward, Im very adept and would score highly on the empathy/emotional social interaction stuff,I pick up social cues way too much for my own good sometimes, but Im considered "shy/quiet" because I dont have an extrovert personality to go with it.
    I'm not sure quite what you're trying to tell me here, other than you don't like the label 'autistic'?

    You don't have to be offended by it. There's nothing inherently wrong with being autistic - as mentioned above, it's a bit like someone being short, or tall, or blue eyed, or whatever else.
  • john80john80 Posts: 828
    hopkinb wrote:
    john80 wrote:
    robert88 wrote:
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.

    This would be true if you wanted to live a live of abject depression blaming everyone else for your perceived issues. Honestly I failed that exam because the other students were mean or the teacher was rubbish. If the above is true then what is the answer. Capitulate to every person that has a problem they wish to claim is related to mental health. Not sure the NHS has got the funds for this widespread navel gazing.

    Mental health issues are "navel gazing"? People kill themselves, people harm themselves, people ruin their own lives and the lives of others due to addiction, act compulsively, or are unable to function normally in society due to crippling anxiety. All because they are a bit sad, or failed an exam, or because someone was mean to them, or because they want to get some extra benefits. Obviously all they need to do is pull themselves up by the bootstraps eh? Give themselves a bit of a talking to. Just like john80, because he's OK. He knows what to do. The University of Life, and the school of hard knocks taught him everything he needs to know. Everyone should be like him.

    Mental health issues are very often brought on by the abusive behaviour of others, very often in childhood, very often repeated generationally.

    Thoughtless bullsh!t about "navel gazing" and the assumption that people seek to blame others, or want to receive some kind of financial gain for their "perceived issues" is why mental health problems are not taken seriously. The fact that you even use the phrase "perceived issues" is instructive. You think they should be OK, so that's the end of the discussion. You have literally not a fcuking clue about mental health, or how it impacts lives, or you wouldn't have written such a load of knee-jerk drivel. And if you do have somone in your life who suffers with mental health problems, and you still wrote that, then you're a monster.

    The view was that most mental health issues were brought about by the behaviour of others. I am not sure how anyone is proposing the others behave to eliminate or reduce mental health issues. Perceived is actually a good word for describing some lesser mental health issues. If you have anxiety this is a problem internal to yourself and is a perception based on your brains inputs from the world around you and its internal perception of these inputs. Everybody gets some symptoms of anxiety but the world is full of anxiety and it is how you deal with it that is key. This is one example of the many mental health issues which are getting significant air time over the more serious issues such as schizophrenia to give one example. Whilst I am sure your monster hand ringing will suit a number of people on Bikeradar I do know people that have or have had addiction or mental health issues to the point they attempt to take their own lives. The bottom line is that you can take a horse to water but you can't make it drink. There is an argument that we as a society should put more money into mental health and addiction but all these policies would start with what pound spent gets the most social benefit as is currently the case with all health spending.

    Currently we in the UK rank 109th in the world for suicide rate. Barbados comes in at the lowest rate.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... icide_rate
    Maybe this is because they are all nicer to each other but the only problem is that crime figures suggest you are 9 times more likely to be the victim of intentional homicide.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... icide_rate
    So we live in a safer more developed country but yet we are 19 times more likely to kill ourselves. Maybe you should get yourself to Barbados and see what they are doing and bring it back to the forum to educate the monsters.
  • webboowebboo Posts: 2,121
    edited March 2019
    john80 wrote:
    hopkinb wrote:
    john80 wrote:
    robert88 wrote:
    Someone, whose view I respect, told me once that mental health issues were very often brought on by the behaviour of others. This morning I am sure that's more true than ever.

    This would be true if you wanted to live a live of abject depression blaming everyone else for your perceived issues. Honestly I failed that exam because the other students were mean or the teacher was rubbish. If the above is true then what is the answer. Capitulate to every person that has a problem they wish to claim is related to mental health. Not sure the NHS has got the funds for this widespread navel gazing.

    Mental health issues are "navel gazing"? People kill themselves, people harm themselves, people ruin their own lives and the lives of others due to addiction, act compulsively, or are unable to function normally in society due to crippling anxiety. All because they are a bit sad, or failed an exam, or because someone was mean to them, or because they want to get some extra benefits. Obviously all they need to do is pull themselves up by the bootstraps eh? Give themselves a bit of a talking to. Just like john80, because he's OK. He knows what to do. The University of Life, and the school of hard knocks taught him everything he needs to know. Everyone should be like him.

    Mental health issues are very often brought on by the abusive behaviour of others, very often in childhood, very often repeated generationally.

    Thoughtless bullsh!t about "navel gazing" and the assumption that people seek to blame others, or want to receive some kind of financial gain for their "perceived issues" is why mental health problems are not taken seriously. The fact that you even use the phrase "perceived issues" is instructive. You think they should be OK, so that's the end of the discussion. You have literally not a fcuking clue about mental health, or how it impacts lives, or you wouldn't have written such a load of knee-jerk drivel. And if you do have somone in your life who suffers with mental health problems, and you still wrote that, then you're a monster.

    The view was that most mental health issues were brought about by the behaviour of others. I am not sure how anyone is proposing the others behave to eliminate or reduce mental health issues. Perceived is actually a good word for describing some lesser mental health issues. If you have anxiety this is a problem internal to yourself and is a perception based on your brains inputs from the world around you and its internal perception of these inputs. Everybody gets some symptoms of anxiety but the world is full of anxiety and it is how you deal with it that is key. This is one example of the many mental health issues which are getting significant air time over the more serious issues such as schizophrenia to give one example. Whilst I am sure your monster hand ringing will suit a number of people on Bikeradar I do know people that have or have had addiction or mental health issues to the point they attempt to take their own lives. The bottom line is that you can take a horse to water but you can't make it drink. There is an argument that we as a society should put more money into mental health and addiction but all these policies would start with what pound spent gets the most social benefit as is currently the case with all health spending.

    Currently we in the UK rank 109th in the world for suicide rate. Barbados comes in at the lowest rate.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... icide_rate
    Maybe this is because they are all nicer to each other but the only problem is that crime figures suggest you are 9 times more likely to be the victim of intentional homicide.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_c ... icide_rate
    So we live in a safer more developed country but yet we are 19 times more likely to kill ourselves. Maybe you should get yourself to Barbados and see what they are doing and bring it back to the forum to educate the monsters.
    Strangely in 30 years as a mental health professional I never came across the view mental health issues were brought on by the behaviour of other people.
    Brought on by one’s perception of other people’s behaviour or your beliefs about other people might have some mileage.
    Although if you were to suggest that in one’s developmental years you experienced some form of abuse or experienced trauma caused by someone else. Then you could say other people’s behaviour causes mental health problems.
Sign In or Register to comment.