Men over 8-stone shouldn't wear Lycra

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Comments

  • paul2718
    paul2718 Posts: 471
    ISTM that there are two questions being conflated. First is team kit, second is unflattering Lycra.

    There's a follow on question regarding why the need to wear race kit analogues when out riding for pleasure or transport.

    I wouldn't pay for a replica kit, give it to me and I'll wear it.

    Lycra works, in terms of comfort and temperature management. So over-weight people who are training have no real option but to let it all bulge. Good for them.

    I don't know what the answer is for just getting on a bike and riding somewhere for transport, when I ride to work I use my regular stuff and carry my jeans in a rucksack, but it adds overhead to the process compared to jumping in the car. But can I ride my road bike 5 miles at a reasonable speed in jeans without causing some collateral damage? Probably the answer is another bike...

    Paul
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    reacher wrote:
    mfin wrote:
    reacher wrote:
    What's wrong with wearing team kit ? If you follow riders or teams stands to reason your going to feel like you would want to buy that to train in rather than some off the shelf tesco shite non descript crap, that's like saying you can't ride the same bikes either

    You're obviously under 16, and it's fine for kids to wear the kit of their heroes, it's positive. Adults don't tend to do it though, and the only ones that do are those that don't realise they look stupid.

    You obviously tried the kit realised you look like a dick wad and totally stupid and now want everyone to feel the same as you did and bin their spanking kit, the problem with that is really good fit amateur cyclists at the correct weight look the mutts nuts in this stuff regardless of how old they are sunshine,
    envy is a bad trait it leads to all sorts of low self esteem problems

    Well, you got that wrong, I've never tried it and never will.

    I can't think of any aspect at all about dressing up to look like a bit of a berk that I would envy.

    Anyway, don't worry, the world would be far less entertaining if we all thought the same on everything.
  • awavey
    awavey Posts: 2,368
    davidof wrote:
    awavey wrote:

    but on the generational thing I mean surely on that point team kits just werent readily available for mere mortals to buy till quite recently

    Define recently for us.

    The only bits of team kit I own date from the very early 80s.

    I never said they werent available,just not readily available, I know some team kit could be got from the 80s onwards but it felt limited availability, I remember walking into the nearly "new" Nike store at Oxford Circus, and you could get US Postal kit (whilst the TdF was on), or the Adidas store countered with T-Mobile kit. But those were and arguably still are kind of one offs for shops in the street, it wasnt that you could just wander in any cycle shop and expect to find a rail of team kit waiting for you.

    whereas now, I hop onto Bobshop.com and could order pretty much team kit for every world tour team, and a stack of pro conti, and even UCI womens teams. and lots of teams, small teams especially, now have the online presence that allows them to sell kit direct to fans, so that seems a massive increase in availability to me thats only really happened in the last 10-15 years or so, which yeah annoyingly maybe ties in with a new generation of cyclists picking up the sport at the same time, but you know Rapha didnt exist 13 years ago, so there was a time in quite recent memory there were no Rapha kit cyclists.
  • ZMC888
    ZMC888 Posts: 292
    I wear hi-viz fluro with the silvery reflective strips. This hardly helps one iota with car drivers, as someone not looking properly will ever suddenly be able to see. The reason is I have a family and with the cycle victim blaming mentality anyone that runs me down injuring or killing me will utterly rely on their 'I couldn't see him' argument and get a slap on the wrist, but wearing bright kit will help damage their inevitable excuses.
  • fat daddy
    fat daddy Posts: 2,605
    men 8 stone and under shouldn't wear Lycra either... with that body mass unless you have a beard you look like a 12 year old girl

    Basically no one should wear it .... I do by the way, but it feels wrong and dirty ... which is partly why I do it :D
  • tootsie323
    tootsie323 Posts: 199
    Much easier if you are a pro wrestler; no need to worry about taking a change of clothes to work.
  • milemuncher1
    milemuncher1 Posts: 1,472
    I always wear team kit on rides. Usually because I got good deals from Pearl Izumi on BMC team bibs and Jerseys. I've also got a TdF Yellow Jersey ( again a good offer in a sale ). The best / most hilarious thing I encounter whilst wearing it, is the actually serious whining I encounter, from the 'take themselves far too seriously' brigade. It's always good for a wind up wearing BMC bibs, Maillot Jaune , Sky socks, and various mitts. Stick a Specialized Bidon, on a Btwin bike, then watch their heads explode.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,244
    mfin wrote:
    I can't think of any aspect at all about dressing up to look like a bit of a berk that I would envy...
    All cyclists look like berks to non cyclists whatever the cyclist wears.
    You are attempting to avoid the inevitable. Go big or go home. :lol:
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    PBlakeney wrote:
    mfin wrote:
    I can't think of any aspect at all about dressing up to look like a bit of a berk that I would envy...
    All cyclists look like berks to non cyclists whatever the cyclist wears.
    You are attempting to avoid the inevitable. Go big or go home. :lol:

    That's because they look like Christmas turkeys in anything remotely slim fitting so the best form of defence is to ridicule a cyclist who looks like he can carry off the look, I'm beginning to think that's true of the ones on here that can't/won't/don't like anyone else wearing it
  • benjamess
    benjamess Posts: 159
    I always wear team kit on rides. Usually because I got good deals from Pearl Izumi on BMC team bibs and Jerseys. I've also got a TdF Yellow Jersey ( again a good offer in a sale ). The best / most hilarious thing I encounter whilst wearing it, is the actually serious whining I encounter, from the 'take themselves far too seriously' brigade. It's always good for a wind up wearing BMC bibs, Maillot Jaune , Sky socks, and various mitts. Stick a Specialized Bidon, on a Btwin bike, then watch their heads explode.

    you were posting on here before 5am just to troll? Good effort.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 25,974
    Wearing lycra shorts for cycling is like wearing football boots for football. You could wear trainers, and if you're just having a kickabout in the park, you would. But once you are playing football, at whatever level, you wear a pair of boots because it's more comfortable.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,244
    "However, in an apparent change of heart, Sir Chris said: "As a 14+stone MAMIL myself, this was a tongue-in-cheek article that wasn't meant to offend.

    "I'm really sorry; reading it back it looks harsh & that wasn't my intention. Whatever ur age/build, if ur on a bike u have my respect."

    Let that be an end to it. Please.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • andcp
    andcp Posts: 644
    Slightly OT question. A guy I know used to work in a small bike shop just north of Derby. One day a bloke turned up on a yellow Pinarello in full Sky kit - jersey, gilet, longs, gloves, Kask helmet, Oakleys, the lot. "Who's this pro kit w*nk*r" wondered he - it was only when the rider removed the helmet and glasses that he recognised him as Sir Dave B.... So the question is, should Sir Dave be allowed to wear Sky kit? he doesn't ride for them after all.
    "It must be true, it's on the internet" - Winston Churchill
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    PBlakeney wrote:
    mfin wrote:
    I can't think of any aspect at all about dressing up to look like a bit of a berk that I would envy...
    All cyclists look like berks to non cyclists whatever the cyclist wears.

    I agree, but the ones that dress up in full pro kit also look like berks to other cyclists.
  • pblakeney
    pblakeney Posts: 25,244
    mfin wrote:
    PBlakeney wrote:
    mfin wrote:
    I can't think of any aspect at all about dressing up to look like a bit of a berk that I would envy...
    All cyclists look like berks to non cyclists whatever the cyclist wears.

    I agree, but the ones that dress up in full pro kit also look like berks to some other cyclists.
    FTFY
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • bianchimoon
    bianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    on radio5 yesterday afternoon they were discussing this and some woman co-founder of 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing for the ahh hmm larger gentlemen, said yes people in lycra do look ridiculous when they stop at cafes... Think that was her Ratner moment and she meant anyone who is daft enough to wear 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing would look ridiculous
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • I'm from the US. Am I missing something here?

    Google is telling me that 8-stone is only 112 lbs. I'm pretty sure every male rider in the pro peloton is heavier than 112 lbs.

    I thought Quintana was like 130lbs and Sagan like 165 lbs. WTF mate? I weigh 165lbs right now. Probably could do 160 if I take 2 weeks off of drinking any beer. The team fit jersey has no "extra" hanging out anywhere. I only wear the team fit if it's a race-simulation training ride or I'm really trying to bust out some time over 20mph for a few hours.

    If he made the comment and meant it to be 112 lbs, he was drunk or being a bit too chatty when he made the comment.

    I'd say "team fit" is pointless unless you actually train and plan to race. Club fit is fine for 90% of people. Shorts are shorts, they look funny on everyone. Just not white, it is horrible. And there is a reason the shorts/tights are worn if you bother riding more than 45 min at a time. Sweat wicking, anti-chaffing, the chamois.

    Bloke was probably drunk at the time....

    Please correct me if 8-stone conversion rate is totally wrong here....
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,178
    I'm from the US. Am I missing something here?
    Yes, this bit:
    PBlakeney wrote:
    "However, in an apparent change of heart, Sir Chris said: "As a 14+stone MAMIL myself, this was a tongue-in-cheek article that wasn't meant to offend.

    "I'm really sorry; reading it back it looks harsh & that wasn't my intention. Whatever ur age/build, if ur on a bike u have my respect."

    Let that be an end to it. Please.
    You are probably right with your figures, I haven't checked them. But you have highlighted the point that should have made it clear to most he wasn't being entirely serious. You are clearly not the only one to have missed the point and being from the US the British humour may well have been missed, not sure what excuse others have.
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,178
    on radio5 yesterday afternoon they were discussing this and some woman co-founder of 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing for the ahh hmm larger gentlemen, said yes people in lycra do look ridiculous when they stop at cafes... Think that was her Ratner moment and she meant anyone who is daft enough to wear 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing would look ridiculous
    Don't think it's a Ratner moment by a long chalk. People buying their stuff know they aren't exactly slim. They are buying clothing that says they are fat and slow so they are probably aware of the fact they don't exactly look svelte. But, they can buy cycle clothing in sizes that fit them and there is a good chance they are cycling to improve their fitness and maybe trying to shift a bit of weight. Good for them.
  • Ahhhh. Thanks.

    It's definitely not my style of humor. I have a bit childish sense of humor.

    As an example, I read and enjoyed Hitchiker's Guide, but some of the humor was just lost on me.
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 25,974
    on radio5 yesterday afternoon they were discussing this and some woman co-founder of 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing for the ahh hmm larger gentlemen, said yes people in lycra do look ridiculous when they stop at cafes... Think that was her Ratner moment and she meant anyone who is daft enough to wear 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing would look ridiculous

    I heard that interview as well, she went on to say that if their customers went out in jogging bottoms and a t shirt, they would be soaking wet from sweat, when they stopped at a café they would be cold, and just generally more uncomfortable. So she explained that's why they do what they do in the sizes they do.
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a nob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well
  • bianchimoon
    bianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    on radio5 yesterday afternoon they were discussing this and some woman co-founder of 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing for the ahh hmm larger gentlemen, said yes people in lycra do look ridiculous when they stop at cafes... Think that was her Ratner moment and she meant anyone who is daft enough to wear 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing would look ridiculous

    I heard that interview as well, she went on to say that if their customers went out in jogging bottoms and a t shirt, they would be soaking wet from sweat, when they stopped at a café they would be cold, and just generally more uncomfortable. So she explained that's why they do what they do in the sizes they do.

    She didn't need to say people look ridiculous in Lycra, if she was an employee she'd be in trouble :wink:
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • haydenm
    haydenm Posts: 2,997
    reacher wrote:
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a doorknob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well

    To play devil's advocate for a second (I don't really care what people wear although I don't wear team kit myself), why buy pro kit deliberately? It's just like non-team kit but doesn't look as good and has names of sponsors who don't sponsor you all over it. The difference between me and them in your example is that they are sponsored by the people the kit features and I'm not. In my head the 'I like Froome so I'm going to ride in replica Froome kit' doesn't make much sense to me, but then a lot of things don't make sense to me...
  • bianchimoon
    bianchimoon Posts: 3,942
    HaydenM wrote:
    reacher wrote:
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a doorknob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well

    To play devil's advocate for a second (I don't really care what people wear although I don't wear team kit myself), why buy pro kit deliberately? It's just like non-team kit but doesn't look as good and has names of sponsors who don't sponsor you all over it. The difference between me and them in your example is that they are sponsored by the people the kit features and I'm not. In my head the 'I like Froome so I'm going to ride in replica Froome kit' doesn't make much sense to me, but then a lot of things don't make sense to me...

    Huh, you come on here with your logic and reason.. the sensible forum is over there>>>


    :wink:
    All lies and jest..still a man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....
  • kingstongraham
    kingstongraham Posts: 25,974
    on radio5 yesterday afternoon they were discussing this and some woman co-founder of 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing for the ahh hmm larger gentlemen, said yes people in lycra do look ridiculous when they stop at cafes... Think that was her Ratner moment and she meant anyone who is daft enough to wear 'fat lad at the back' cycle clothing would look ridiculous

    I heard that interview as well, she went on to say that if their customers went out in jogging bottoms and a t shirt, they would be soaking wet from sweat, when they stopped at a café they would be cold, and just generally more uncomfortable. So she explained that's why they do what they do in the sizes they do.

    She didn't need to say people look ridiculous in Lycra, if she was an employee she'd be in trouble :wink:

    She didn't need to say that people look ridiculous in Lycra, it's true. I have a mirror.
  • cq20
    cq20 Posts: 207
    It is lazy journalism and Hoy & co being, at best, naive about how their articles will be edited, re-quoted and used to ridicule the very people who have contributed to the growth in cycling.

    Personally, I'm more at the ALDI end of the clothing spectrum but don't care if people want to ride team kit. That is up to them. Why should it be anyone else's business.
  • Orkneylad
    Orkneylad Posts: 104
    reacher wrote:
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a doorknob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well

    It' sounds like you 'justify' your team kit usage because you 'do everything a Pro does' . . . . only slower? Dude that just makes no sense to me at all.

    Earlier you suggested all the cyclists who find it distasteful were probably 'christmas turkeys' and just envious of your svelte souplesse, surely there's some level of narcissism at work? Perhaps it's touched a nerve because you actually really care how others might be judging you? You should care a lot less, everyone has opinions.

    I don't think anyone has said you CAN'T wear whatever you like, or ride whatever you can afford.
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,497
    edited August 2017
    HaydenM wrote:
    reacher wrote:
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a doorknob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well

    To play devil's advocate for a second (I don't really care what people wear although I don't wear team kit myself), why buy pro kit deliberately? It's just like non-team kit but doesn't look as good and has names of sponsors who don't sponsor you all over it. The difference between me and them in your example is that they are sponsored by the people the kit features and I'm not. In my head the 'I like Froome so I'm going to ride in replica Froome kit' doesn't make much sense to me, but then a lot of things don't make sense to me...

    The boldy bit is wholly subjective - a few bits I have, Veran Classic, JLT Condor, Cannondale, and Direct Energie, I really like the designs and colourways of - otherwise I wouldn't have bought them.

    Additionally, some of the kit, end of season, or when sponsors change, can be had for silly money - for example I have a Sky LS jersey that cost me £39 - instead of the RRP of something like £140 that a fair few people would have forked out a few months earlier.
    The quality is sublime but personally I only wear it under another layer, but it's a top quality garment that happens to have sponsors on, but for a bargain price - to my mind, why would you not buy an item at that price that had all those technical features?
    If you don't want to wear it as a top layer, then keep it for the winter and reap the benefits that way.

    I'm fairly sure a load of people from here managed to get some Belkin kit for pennies, something stupid like £10 or so for jerseys and bibshorts - forget the manufacturer, but it was potentially Santini or Nalini - proper quality kit, and a fair few people said they were just going to use them for turbo or commuting duty, and fair play to them, why would you not at that price, it would seem you were being dim not to do so, as it's bargaintastic kit, for less than the price of what Aldi, Lidl or maybe even sports direct knock out.

    The JLT Condor stuff was also something like 50-70% off, and it's pro kit, so top quality, and also bloody small admittedly :shock:
    So it was cheaper than regular Mavic kit, and also better quality, oh and I liked the colours, and designs, so it didn't take me long to make the decision :D

    Those are my personal reasons for buying pro kit, as and when I do, It's a small percentage of my wardrobe however.
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    Orkneylad wrote:
    reacher wrote:
    I dont understand this at all, you go to all the trouble of buying a road bike, getting in shape, dragging yourself out in all weathers to train, bust a gut to reach a respectable level, in short do everything that a pro rider does, the only thing that's differant is your not at the same level and because the guy who does all that wears some team kit of his favourite team/ rider that's considered to be stupid and make them look like a doorknob, you just as well say unless you reach a certain standard you can't have the bike either, but then that's been said on here as well

    It' sounds like you 'justify' your team kit usage because you 'do everything a Pro does' . . . . only slower? Dude that just makes no sense to me at all.

    Earlier you suggested all the cyclists who find it distasteful were probably 'christmas turkeys' and just envious of your svelte souplesse, surely there's some level of narcissism at work? Perhaps it's touched a nerve because you actually really care how others might be judging you? You should care a lot less, everyone has opinions.

    I don't think anyone has said you CAN'T wear whatever you like, or ride whatever you can afford.

    None of that, no one sees me ride