Resistance training to supplement Cycling: Poll

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Comments

  • All my weight training I do is nothing to do with cycling. Its for done for other sports. I only cycle as a means of transport. I can't tell if it made me a faster cyclist. At least I can accelerate like hell when I needed to and climb up hills like its nothing. Either way resistance training didn't hinder my cycling one bit, thats for sure.
  • iPete
    iPete Posts: 6,076
    FatTed wrote:
    just in case anyone is remotely interested:

    after 11 resistance training sessions, i've seen some changes. no specific interval training, just cycling really. leg day on mon and friday, with road spins on sat, sun and maybe a wednesday. usually 1.5 hrs wed, 4 hours sat and sun. no turbo work recently either. up until my last race i was doing +200miles/ week including specific intervals. i had a week on the beer and chocolate, then i hit the gym. since then i've seen the following changes:

    10 min power going from 260 to 272 watts (last week)
    4 min power going from 310 to 324, 327, 330 (last week)
    ftp from 240 to ??? (this weekend i hope)

    if theres a negative (or placebo) side to what i'm doing, i'm not seeing it. i can feel my legs are a bit off on sat morn but on sunday i'm ok. this friday i'll skip leg day (pre test) as a routine rest day, before starting another 5 week block.

    i havent done my nails fwiw.


    Probably got some well earned rest

    Yup, that’s a lot of miles. What level are you racing at?
  • Massive 'gains' to be found from weight training. I train in the gym 2/3 times per week
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,038
    Massive 'gains' to be found from weight training. I train in the gym 2/3 times per week

    According to Imposter, it's all in your head. You need a first class shrink to undo the placebo effect because you haven't got any hard scientific Acrylic nails... err sorry, evidence.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Pinno wrote:
    According to Imposter, it's all in your head.

    There you go - trolling me again. Unless the guy clarifies his comment, it is pointless speculating as to what he means. But once again, you can take it as a victory for simplistic anecdotes.
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,038
    edited November 2018
    Imposter wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    According to Imposter, it's all in your head.

    There you go - trolling me again. Unless the guy clarifies his comment, it is pointless speculating as to what he means. But once again, you can take it as a victory for simplistic anecdotes.

    Stalking someone is not a good attribute.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Pinno wrote:

    Stalking someone is not a good attribute.

    So pack it in, then. And learn to use the quote function correctly while you're at it.
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,038
    Imposter wrote:
    By reading (and attempting to understand) the work of others who have studied the area professionally - and with slightly more serious intent than you. My own experience would be nothing more than n=1 anecdote, same as anyone else's.

    Was that a better use of the quote function, me Lord?

    Can you produce the articles to which you refer? I have asked before but you declined. Do they actually exist? Until you do, then I can only presume that your opinion is purely anecdotal.

    Lets get back to some basics.
    My poll has little scientific basis.
    It can draw little scientific conclusion.

    But interesting nonetheless. Some posters actually put some statistical measure of performance. Ipete mentioned posture and imbalance from cycling alone which in turn may cause problems. Others talked about recovery from injury. It has raised some interesting points even if the poll has little scientific credibility - something I mentioned from the outset.
    If for nothing else, it has been interesting reading other people's experiences.

    I'll apologise if banter is not your thing. Perhaps you need to pop down to BB or CS and let your hair down a little. Might do you some good.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • trananha91
    trananha91 Posts: 3
    edited October 2016
    Ever heard of confirmation bias.. :D

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  • smudgerii
    smudgerii Posts: 125
    trananha91 wrote:
    Ever heard of confirmation bias.. :D


    Is it an exercise? Or just a term you once heard?
  • dennisn
    dennisn Posts: 10,601
    Pinno wrote:
    I am interested because if only, it will annoy Imposter something chronic.

    Same here. I'd mention weight training but that would probably pop a vein in his forehead.
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    Pretty interesting reading, I must admit to being surprised when you see female cyclists going up climbs at pretty astonishing speeds and then see them in the gym and clearly they have very little leg strength as regards moving actual weight on a bar while doing say squats or leg press compared to guys so somewhere along the line choice of gears and cadence along with capacity to keep turning the pedals fast clearly can overcome brute strength, weight training or gym work is actually something you see a lot of athletes of quite high standard doing in the gym I use
  • smudgerii
    smudgerii Posts: 125
    reacher wrote:
    Pretty interesting reading, I must admit to being surprised when you see female cyclists going up climbs at pretty astonishing speeds and then see them in the gym and clearly they have very little leg strength as regards moving actual weight on a bar while doing say squats or leg press compared to guys so somewhere along the line choice of gears and cadence along with capacity to keep turning the pedals fast clearly can overcome brute strength, weight training or gym work is actually something you see a lot of athletes of quite high standard doing in the gym I use


    Not all weight training is strength related... Weight training can be beneficial across many aspects of sporting activity, core strength for example is benefitted by squats and weighted lunges but it doesn't need to be heavy.
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    That's not really being disputed, the question seems to be the effect on cycling performance of strength training ie strength as a direct correlation to performance as measured in a gym on weights, the argument for gym work is well documented however that still does not explain how a slim girl rider can go up a climb a lot faster than many guys can yet clearly not have the same amount of muscular strength, seems to be gym work benefits you but riding benefits you a lot more as regards improvement on the bike
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,038
    reacher wrote:
    That's not really being disputed, the question seems to be the effect on cycling performance of strength training ie strength as a direct correlation to performance as measured in a gym on weights, the argument for gym work is well documented however that still does not explain how a slim girl rider can go up a climb a lot faster than many guys can yet clearly not have the same amount of muscular strength, seems to be gym work benefits you but riding benefits you a lot more as regards improvement on the bike

    My poll is about supplementing cycling. The general consensus for those who go to the gym, is about gym work helping to rebalance the effects of cycling, reducing injury by improving strength in those areas that get neglected.
    In essence, I don't disagree with most of your post but slim woman going up hill quick can be more about power to weight ratio and aerobic efficiency than strength. I wouldn't see into it that much. 75 kg bloke as opposed to 55 kg woman? No matter how strong the bloke is, he has to lug 20kg's more against gravity.

    I do not use heavy weights at the gym - low weight/high repetition.

    As a post script, I went out one day this summer on a 70 mile ride. Cafe stop in the middle (of course). I paced myself and was just about to make a turn left up a hill and I spotted a cyclist coming the other way, some 70 yds off. I kept a really good pace up the climb bearing in mind that I didn't want to cook myself and I am not sluggish uphill. Despite my 'pace' and the 70yds gap, the cyclist passed me - female and quick too.
    Coming out of the Cafe and she was there. I struck up a conversation. It boiled down to her doing a short sharp 27 mile loop and I was going a little further. It gave me a little heart but even if I had been on a short ride, I think keeping up with her on that climb would have been an effort.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    Then I don't get the question your asking people to answer you asked how many people use a gym to supplement cycling use it for what then ? Presumably that means use the gym to improve your cycling. Theirs no question that a gym has benifets for general health or rehabilitation. Are you asking does resistance training improve your cycling or is resistance training good for you ? If the latter then why not just ask does anyone use a gym
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,038
    It was just a straight question - "Have you used any of the following exercises to assist your training? Some of these may include:.."

    The merits of gym training and performance gains is highly subjective and cannot be ascertained by this poll. In fact, it has zero scientific value. Various protagonists have posted their opinion and experiences and the thread has evolved. I don't and have not taken it too seriously and it isn't part of some academic research.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    ok i see where your coming from, the answer is yes and very effectively. Gym work wont beat natural ability or time spent on a bike though no matter how much you do of it