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Rim vs. disc brakes - which will win most stages in TdF 2020?

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  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 11,177
    Yeah, it should be in the manufacturers interests to sort this out as well, you would think.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,621
    ddraver said:

    Seems like a very solvable problem to me...

    But it will remain a problem until it is resolved.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 26,242
    Neutral service could lay the smack down and just say, "we're gonna carry 142x12mm wheels (which is what most of them seem to be) and 100x15mm (?) wheels.

    One suspects manufacturers may jump on that bandwagon very quickly...
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,621
    Finding the solution is easy.
    Implementing it is the tricky part.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • mididoctorsmididoctors Posts: 16,460
    ddraver said:

    Seems like a very solvable problem to me...

    I think.the teams are going to demand it . Hopefully
    "If I was a 38 year old man, I definitely wouldn't be riding a bright yellow bike with Hello Kitty disc wheels, put it that way. What we're witnessing here is the world's most high profile mid-life crisis" Afx237vi Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:43 pm
  • mididoctorsmididoctors Posts: 16,460
    edited September 2020
    The growth of proprietary standards is the bane of modern cycle consumerism . Not only is it irritating and monopolising but it has lead to some bad engineering .
    "If I was a 38 year old man, I definitely wouldn't be riding a bright yellow bike with Hello Kitty disc wheels, put it that way. What we're witnessing here is the world's most high profile mid-life crisis" Afx237vi Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:43 pm
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    So what was the overall result ? Rim or disc ?
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 11,177

    The growth of proprietary standards is the bane of modern cycle consumerism . Not only is it irritating and monopolising but it has lead to some bad engineering .

    Fortunately 11 and 12 speed cassettes have come together in terms of spacing between brands now, that's a good thing.
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    edited September 2020
    fenix said:

    So what was the overall result ? Rim or disc ?

    Disc brakes won 12-9 for what it's worth.

    Pretty meaningless IMO, in a similar vein Shimano beat Campagnolo 14-7. I can't remember how many teams were using SRAM but they failed to get a single stage win.



  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,621

    Disc brakes won 12-9 for what it's worth.

    Pretty meaningless IMO, in a similar vein Shimano beat Campagnolo 14-7.

    Is it more important that yellow was won on rims and Campag? 😉
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • mididoctorsmididoctors Posts: 16,460

    The growth of proprietary standards is the bane of modern cycle consumerism . Not only is it irritating and monopolising but it has lead to some bad engineering .

    Fortunately 11 and 12 speed cassettes have come together in terms of spacing between brands now, that's a good thing.
    It's deeply annoying . Campag 11 works ok with Shimano 11 cassettes too I hear ? Which is a money saver
    "If I was a 38 year old man, I definitely wouldn't be riding a bright yellow bike with Hello Kitty disc wheels, put it that way. What we're witnessing here is the world's most high profile mid-life crisis" Afx237vi Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:43 pm
  • mrb123mrb123 Posts: 4,485
    ddraver said:

    Neutral service could lay the smack down and just say, "we're gonna carry 142x12mm wheels (which is what most of them seem to be) and 100x15mm (?) wheels.

    One suspects manufacturers may jump on that bandwagon very quickly...

    What rotor sizes?
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,467
    One of the most ridiculous sights in the TdF was was poor old Ritchie Port being put on a disc-braked Trek for the uphill section of the stage 20 TT after a bike swap... He came third in the stage after Dumoulin by a fraction of a second. Presumably he would have come second without the aerodynamic disdvantage of the discs (I'll assume they managed to get the Emonda down to 6.8kg and that weight wasn't a factor).

    This, after nearly losing time on Stage 18 after puncturing on the gravel and having to wait for a bike change rather than take a wheel from neutral service due to running discs.

    Of course Trek will still be using his well deserved podium place to sell the disc braked Emonda..
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 26,242
    edited September 2020
    mrb123 said:

    ddraver said:

    Neutral service could lay the smack down and just say, "we're gonna carry 142x12mm wheels (which is what most of them seem to be) and 100x15mm (?) wheels.

    One suspects manufacturers may jump on that bandwagon very quickly...

    What rotor sizes?
    What are most bikes sold with now? 160F 140R?

    Sorted

    Easy
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 26,242
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 27,112
    ddraver said:

    Neutral service need to get with the times....


    Some of their back wheels don't even have motors in them
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • jam1ejam1e Posts: 1,065
    If teams were actually that fussed about speeding up wheel changes they'd have the riders turning the bike upside down to put an end to the spectacle of the mechanic pissing about holding the bike up whilst trying to re-fit the rear wheel.

    This cackhandedness causes infinitely more time loss than a threaded axle.

    (one for the unpopular opinions thread I reckon.)
  • jam1e said:

    If teams were actually that fussed about speeding up wheel changes they'd have the riders turning the bike upside down to put an end to the spectacle of the mechanic pissing about holding the bike up whilst trying to re-fit the rear wheel.

    This cackhandedness causes infinitely more time loss than a threaded axle.

    (one for the unpopular opinions thread I reckon.)

    In my experience it is a hell of a lot quicker to change wheels with the bike right way up, especially at the rear to get it in right place beside the deraileur
  • webboowebboo Posts: 6,051
    Oh no not a turn your bike upside advocate.
  • bobmcstuffbobmcstuff Posts: 11,177
    I usually turn mine upside down... But then I am usually standing at the side of the road, have to take the wheel off and then change the inner tube before I can refit the wheel...
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 70,638 Lives Here

    I usually turn mine upside down... But then I am usually standing at the side of the road, have to take the wheel off and then change the inner tube before I can refit the wheel...

    Ruins the handlbars / shifters etc.
  • jam1ejam1e Posts: 1,065
    neonriver said:

    jam1e said:

    If teams were actually that fussed about speeding up wheel changes they'd have the riders turning the bike upside down to put an end to the spectacle of the mechanic pissing about holding the bike up whilst trying to re-fit the rear wheel.

    This cackhandedness causes infinitely more time loss than a threaded axle.

    (one for the unpopular opinions thread I reckon.)

    In my experience it is a hell of a lot quicker to change wheels with the bike right way up, especially at the rear to get it in right place beside the deraileur
    You should offer your services to the pros, they don't seem to find that to be the case.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 19,912
    Easier to get it straight if it is upside down, but I'm no pro
  • dish_dashdish_dash Posts: 5,534

    I usually turn mine upside down... But then I am usually standing at the side of the road, have to take the wheel off and then change the inner tube before I can refit the wheel...

    Ruins the handlbars / shifters etc.
    And so if you're on the side of the road what are you meant to do with the bike while you're actually sorting the puncture out. Leave it sitting on its mech, or on its side? In my mind the hoods and saddle are the safest things to leave the bike sitting on...

    You've got strange set up if the bike is actually sitting on its handlebars.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,621
    jam1e said:

    neonriver said:

    jam1e said:

    If teams were actually that fussed about speeding up wheel changes they'd have the riders turning the bike upside down to put an end to the spectacle of the mechanic pissing about holding the bike up whilst trying to re-fit the rear wheel.

    This cackhandedness causes infinitely more time loss than a threaded axle.

    (one for the unpopular opinions thread I reckon.)

    In my experience it is a hell of a lot quicker to change wheels with the bike right way up, especially at the rear to get it in right place beside the deraileur
    You should offer your services to the pros, they don't seem to find that to be the case.
    You've obviously not watched much pro racing.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • jam1ejam1e Posts: 1,065
    Busted, I'm just a filthy casual. Like the mechanic trying to sort out G's puncture in the 2014 CW games.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 70,638 Lives Here
    dish_dash said:

    I usually turn mine upside down... But then I am usually standing at the side of the road, have to take the wheel off and then change the inner tube before I can refit the wheel...

    Ruins the handlbars / shifters etc.
    And so if you're on the side of the road what are you meant to do with the bike while you're actually sorting the puncture out. Leave it sitting on its mech, or on its side? In my mind the hoods and saddle are the safest things to leave the bike sitting on...

    You've got strange set up if the bike is actually sitting on its handlebars.
    Lay it on the side is what I do.... or against a wall or lamppost or whatever.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 24,621
    jam1e said:

    Busted, I'm just a filthy casual. Like the mechanic trying to sort out G's puncture in the 2014 CW games.

    Well done for finding an exception! I'd question that mechanics credentials.
    They ideally want to swap a wheel in less than 5 seconds.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • If you've got the mechs in the right position you should be able to get a rim brake wheel in with one hand holding the bike with the other in a few seconds - then just whip up the QR.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • mididoctorsmididoctors Posts: 16,460
    hang it by the saddle tip off a sign or branch
    "If I was a 38 year old man, I definitely wouldn't be riding a bright yellow bike with Hello Kitty disc wheels, put it that way. What we're witnessing here is the world's most high profile mid-life crisis" Afx237vi Mon Jul 20, 2009 2:43 pm
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