What is SIS Rego made of?

2»

Comments

  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    joey54321 wrote:
    What's wrong with enjoying cake?

    Nothing in itself. But it's not about cake per se, it's about the culture..
  • Agreed. The culture is pish poor. Guys ride to the cafe because that's what they do. They sit in the same tables every time, and order the same stuff every time. They seem to see going to the cafe as the reason for going out. I go to the cafe, sometimes. A quick coffee and flapjack and off. Use it as a refreshment point, not as the focus of the ride.

    But..the cafe I go to also gets visited at weekends my motorbikers. You should see them shovel away the cholesterol. And talk and shout at full volume. Makes cyclists with a cup of coffee and a piece of cake seem positively restrained.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    But..the cafe I go to also gets visited at weekends my motorbikers. You should see them shovel away the cholesterol. And talk and shout at full volume. Makes cyclists with a cup of coffee and a piece of cake seem positively restrained.

    Bikers have never really moved on from the 'full english at the greasy spoon' culture.. ;)
  • joey54321
    joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    Imposter wrote:
    joey54321 wrote:
    What's wrong with enjoying cake?

    Nothing in itself. But it's not about cake per se, it's about the culture..

    Ah ok, well, for me it's about the cake.
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Agreed. The culture is pish poor. Guys ride to the cafe because that's what they do. They sit in the same tables every time, and order the same stuff every time. They seem to see going to the cafe as the reason for going out. I go to the cafe, sometimes. A quick coffee and flapjack and off. Use it as a refreshment point, not as the focus of the ride.

    But..the cafe I go to also gets visited at weekends my motorbikers. You should see them shovel away the cholesterol. And talk and shout at full volume. Makes cyclists with a cup of coffee and a piece of cake seem positively restrained.


    Pretty much this.

    I was mulling over joining the local club last year. One cold morning I was about 25 miles from home and I decided to stop for a coffee before heading back home (still the one and only time I've done so).

    By coincidence a bike club (can't say if it was my own particular local club) had also decided to stop there and as I walked inside hat in hand there were about a dozen of them sat there tucking into full breakfasts. I was going to say hello but for whatever reason I didn't bother, I just ordered my coffee to go and left.

    After sipping my coffee and warming my fingers at a nearby park bench for 15 minutes, I was off again on my bike and the club members in the cafe were still inside socialising and enjoying their meal.

    I couldn't quite place it at the time what seemed off to me but later on I realised that even though I consider myself a sociable fella I just had no interest in a trip to the cafe once a week at the crack of dawn to chew the fat with other riders. When I'm on my bike I'm there to enjoy riding, not to sit, eat and discuss the merits of the latest designer cycling shoes.
  • joenobody
    joenobody Posts: 563
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Sone very interesting thoughts from clearly intelligent people who I have no doubt forgotten more about cycling than I care to know.

    Bit of a mixed bag though - whey protein being a scam tickles me for example, as does the apparent perception that striving to better your athletic ability in your chosen hobby is massaging your own ego.
    I don't know that I'd know more about cycling than you (or anyone else). I'm perhaps a bit more up on nutrition because I'm married to a nutritionist so I have access to professional advice whenever I want it. To fair though, her specialisation is women's health, not sport. The thing about whey is true. Not sure I'd say it was a scam, but someone figured out how to sell a waste product and it got turned into this massive market. Also, there's nothing wrong with striving to better your athletic ability, but you can do that without the fancy kit that many of us own, but don't really need, and probably don't use to its full potential/capability.
    I get it guys, I really do. This seems to be somewhat of a generational thing, or maybe a cycling thing.

    I'm 39 years old and only been cycling a year, so while I basically know bugger all compared to all you chaps, I'm also not steeped in the coffee and cake cycling culture that I want no part of.
    I'm only 42, so pretty much the same age as you. I'm also not in to the coffee/cake culture. I will be joining one of the local clubs soon though. More so I have some focus for getting out on my bike - it's easier to bail on a ride if you're solo than if you've committed to join a group ride. And it's also good for not having to plan your own routes.
  • it's easier to bail on a ride if you're solo than if you've committed to join a group ride

    Winners never quit.
    Quitters never win.
  • craigus89
    craigus89 Posts: 887
    As Matthew might say...

    #marketing
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    There's something ironic about a load of cyclists getting together on the internet to moan about a load of cyclists getting together in a cafe and having a chat and a slice of cake.

    Believe me, they aren't all sat around moaning about lone cyclists being a bunch of miserable bastards, although it would perhaps be justified.
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    TimothyW wrote:
    There's something ironic about a load of cyclists getting together on the internet to moan about a load of cyclists getting together in a cafe and having a chat and a slice of cake.

    Believe me, they aren't all sat around moaning about lone cyclists being a bunch of miserable bastards, although it would perhaps be justified.
    :lol:
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    edited June 2019
    TimothyW wrote:
    Believe me, they aren't all sat around moaning about lone cyclists being a bunch of miserable bastards, although it would perhaps be justified.

    Each to their own, I say. Calling another rider a ‘miserable bastard’ simply because they don’t conform to your group identity is interesting though..
  • timothyw
    timothyw Posts: 2,482
    Imposter wrote:
    Believe me, they aren't all sat around moaning about lone cyclists being a bunch of miserable bastards, although it would perhaps be justified.

    Each to their own, I say. Calling another rider a ‘miserable bastard’ simply because they don’t conform to your group identity is interesting though..
    [/quote][/quote]
    Calling you a miserable bastard is justified on a number of levels. :lol::lol::lol:
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    TimothyW wrote:
    Calling you a miserable bastard is justified on a number of levels. :lol::lol::lol:

    What ‘levels’ is it justified on?
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Imposter wrote:
    TimothyW wrote:
    Believe me, they aren't all sat around moaning about lone cyclists being a bunch of miserable bastards, although it would perhaps be justified.

    Each to their own, I say. Calling another rider a ‘miserable bastard’ simply because they don’t conform to your group identity is interesting though..


    And there it is.

    Enjoy your cake this weekend :wink:
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Imposter wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    I'm 39 years old and only been cycling a year, so while I basically know bugger all compared to all you chaps, I'm also not steeped in the coffee and cake cycling culture that I want no part of.

    The coffee/cake culture is a bit sh1t, I agree. That seems to be a relatively recent phenomenon, it wasn't always like that - not in my experience, anyway.

    Not quite sure what is recent about it, cyclists used to go to cafe's in the 80's and no doubt since cycling was invented, although we drank mainly tea because the coffee was crap. Other than that Im not really sure what is wrong with a social call at a cafe I quite enjoy it when on a group ride, its called being sociable. Or does everyone on here suggest we should all cycle alone and not socialise ever?
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 42,230
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Guys are we really suggesting that a milkshake or a ham sandwich is as nutritious as a tailor made protein+carb+amino acids product?

    From a recovery perspective, I don't think there is any evidence that a ham sandwich or a chocolate milkshake from Tesco is any less effective in the real world. Those items may not contain all the wizz-bang ingredients that the recovery shake has, but that doesn't mean you will necessarily recover any better using the shake.

    Recovery shakes are convenient and have their uses - but other methods can be just as viable.


    Actually there is an absolute ton of evidence, what with sport science being a billion dollar industry for the past 20 years.

    Are we saying the glycogen replenishment window doesn't exist? How about good old basic macros? Are those nonsense too?

    Come one fella, you can't really believe a bloody tesco milkshake or ham sandwich is delivering your body the same nutrients as a specific recovery formula? Not to mention the absorption rates of those nutrients.

    I think you're missing the point, my understanding of what others are saying is that you can get the balance of proteins and carbs needed for recovery from whole foods. All that protein shakes are doing is providing a mix of ingredients that provide what you need in a single, convenient (and relatively expensive) product. I use protein shakes fairly regularly after fairly intensive exercise where I'm not able to get any good whole food inside me within the first hour either because I'm driving back from a race or somewhere where there's nowhere to eat or also because I quite often can't stomach a meal after a hard race or training run. Protein is protein whether from a large chicken breast or whey powder although it may be that it gets absorbed more easily in one form than the other. The biggest problem with shakes is they often have all sorts of added ingredients that do nothing to assist in recovery or nutrition purely to make them palatable.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    I'm 39 years old and only been cycling a year, so while I basically know bugger all compared to all you chaps, I'm also not steeped in the coffee and cake cycling culture that I want no part of.

    The coffee/cake culture is a bit sh1t, I agree. That seems to be a relatively recent phenomenon, it wasn't always like that - not in my experience, anyway.

    Not quite sure what is recent about it, cyclists used to go to cafe's in the 80's and no doubt since cycling was invented, although we drank mainly tea because the coffee was crap. Other than that Im not really sure what is wrong with a social call at a cafe I quite enjoy it when on a group ride, its called being sociable. Or does everyone on here suggest we should all cycle alone and not socialise ever?

    Nope - I don't believe anybody has suggested that on here. Our club runs in the 90s always stopped at a cafe between Oct - xmas (no stops after xmas), usually for a pot of tea and a toasted tea cake, or similar. The point being made, I believe, is more generally in relation to the upsurge in/homage to 'cafe culture', rather than actually stopping for something to eat/drink per se.
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 42,230
    Yep, a cafe stop used to be tea and beans on toast for most to refuel at midway on our club runs in the early 90s. The posing in lycra on a table outside a hipster coffee shop sipping an espresso seems to be relatively new and based on images of pros out on their winter social rides. Cake is good though!
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Well thanks for clarifying what cafe culture is in cycling haha hipsters yes I see your point now. I still go out with a fast training ride on saturdays and it always finishes at a cafe with tea/coffee and beans on toast or a flapjack, so perhaps some things don't change
  • chirpy999
    chirpy999 Posts: 1
    Back in the 80s we regularly would go to a Little Chef you got free refills of coffee. N owadays whilst not in a club I'll stop at a different café whilst out to try the coffee an do a little people watching , I wont buy the cake £2 is too much so if I come across a Birds shop ( a East Midlands company)I'll get a cake for about a £1.
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Little Thiefs had the worst coffee of all time and not all cake is £2 though it is now 2019 ya know ;)
  • It's not 2019 to the cafe habitues. It's still 1969.
    The head honcho of the local club is still riding out in knee socks and plus fours. Guess where he goes?