What is SIS Rego made of?

Darius_Jedburgh
Darius_Jedburgh Posts: 675
I've been taking this through the summer. Is it doing me any good? The ingredients list seems to indicate that it has everything in it, but what does it all do?
Is it any real use or are there alternatives. I know it's pretty pricey. Is it value for money?

It always leaves a scum on the inside of my bottle. What is it doing to the inside of me?
«1

Comments

  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,742
    ...
    It always leaves a scum on the inside of my bottle. What is it doing to the inside of me?

    wouldn't worry about that, imagine what food looks like after you've finished chewing it, it'd leave more than a bit of scum behind on a bottle :D

    if you are training at high intensity, recovery drinks are a fast way of getting a carb+protein hit when you may not be ready for 'proper' food, but if you have a good overall diet i doubt there's any other benefit beyond that
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • Thanks. So a piece of my wife's scrumptious home made cakes would be just as good?
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Thanks. So a piece of my wife's scrumptious home made cakes would be just as good?

    That would depend. Recovery shakes are useful for the reasons stated above, or if you have training planned on consecutive days when it can be worthwhile to take on some protein and/or carbs in liquid form within 30mins or so of the end of the session.
  • singleton
    singleton Posts: 2,523
    It's a recovery drink - so helps your body to recover and rebuild faster.
    Remember that training doesn't make you fitter - recovery after training makes you fitter.
    I use this if I've got a high volume / high intensity week but at other times I just eat regular meals.
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Thanks. So a piece of my wife's scrumptious home made cakes would be just as good?
    No but a cheese or ham sandwich may well be.
    Recovery shakes contain carbs and protein to aid recovery, after High Intensity exercise you need to start the recovery process as quickly as possible to allow you to be ready to train again at high intensity.
    I use SIS Rego and enjoy it but I only tend to use it after a race or after hard training if I am not going to be eating properly immediately afterwards.
    If you are riding solely for leisure then I wouldn't bother unless I could not get to real food for a while.
  • OK. Thanks guys. Think a summary is that after a routine ride not to bother, especially as I usually eat within 30 mins of finishing. But if I've been hammering it then I should take some.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Hammering it or not - the best use of a recovery drink is if you need to be able to train again the next day and you are unlikely to be eating any 'real' food within the next 30 mins or so..
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.
  • To better clarify, SIS Rego is made from Soy protein so is dairy free.
    You are shoving a load of artificial processed chemicals into your body though when 'real' food would be more beneficial.
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Imposter wrote:
    Hammering it or not - the best use of a recovery drink is if you need to be able to train again the next day and you are unlikely to be eating any 'real' food within the next 30 mins or so..
    So you would suggest he needs a recovery drink after 3 days of zone 1 riding because he wants to train the next day?
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
    It is
  • Alejandrosdog
    Alejandrosdog Posts: 1,975
    i think talk of what someone needs to do recovery wise is ridiculous without having a good understanding of their performance and capacity in a significant previous period.

    EG i could ride for 5 hours for three days in zone one and just eat normally. I might burn a bit of muscle but id probably just use fat. The only other thing that would happen is id get bored.

    other people would struggle to ride two days on the trot for an hour and a half without some kind of recovery drink.

    To the op its a voyage of discovery during which you will make many mistakes until you find whats right for you. Not that helpful but specific advice like some of that above is just piffle.

    As for rego, I love the stuff, the banana especially but i cant say that i feel it makes a massive difference for me apart from if I'm trying to lose weight and doing long rides in december january and february then it stops me from eating anything and everything before dinner time so i believe its helpful in calorie control.... but a couple of cheese or ham sandwhiches seems to be good for a re fuel.

    I also use it when im after doing long hard rides back to back on multi day events because i find it easy on my stomach.
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
    It is
    Why.
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Webboo wrote:
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
    It is
    Why.

    Okay, having researched it I take that back. I drink plenty of fully skimmed milk so maybe I will ditch the rego, though it can be in a convenient form for easy transport and life. I do like the flavoor as well. Though having read the linked article I now wonder why recovery drinks reckon to work faster when mixed with water rather than milk?
    Here is the best article I found so thanks for asking the question
    https://anitabean.co.uk/milk-vs-recover ... al-winner/
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
    It is
    Why.

    Okay, having researched it I take that back. I drink plenty of fully skimmed milk so maybe I will ditch the rego, though it can be in a convenient form for easy transport and life. I do like the flavoor as well. Though having read the linked article I now wonder why recovery drinks reckon to work faster when mixed with water rather than milk?
    Here is the best article I found so thanks for asking the question
    https://anitabean.co.uk/milk-vs-recover ... al-winner/
    I made the suggestion having read something similar in the past. However when challenged by your good self I did wonder if it was no longer seen as good.
    My own experience of using any sort of recovery drink is I feel no different if I have one or don’t bother. I suspect it might be that I only tend have one when I’m completely boxed, usually after a long ride where I have pushed it to get it finished.
  • OnTheRopes
    OnTheRopes Posts: 460
    Webboo wrote:
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    OnTheRopes wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Webboo wrote:
    A milk shake made with skimmed milk is just as good.
    Or semi skimmed if you can’t face drinking the diary equivalent of tip ex.

    Poor advice.
    It is
    Why.

    Okay, having researched it I take that back. I drink plenty of fully skimmed milk so maybe I will ditch the rego, though it can be in a convenient form for easy transport and life. I do like the flavoor as well. Though having read the linked article I now wonder why recovery drinks reckon to work faster when mixed with water rather than milk?
    Here is the best article I found so thanks for asking the question
    https://anitabean.co.uk/milk-vs-recover ... al-winner/
    I made the suggestion having read something similar in the past. However when challenged by your good self I did wonder if it was no longer seen as good.
    My own experience of using any sort of recovery drink is I feel no different if I have one or don’t bother. I suspect it might be that I only tend have one when I’m completely boxed, usually after a long ride where I have pushed it to get it finished.
    I suspect though that you would be unlikely to feel different whether it works or not as recovery is over hours and not seconds
  • webboo
    webboo Posts: 6,087
    I was meaning how I feel the next day.
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Guys are we really suggesting that a milkshake or a ham sandwich is as nutritious as a tailor made protein+carb+amino acids product?

    I mean, I really don't won't to get drawn into a debate on the subject but I don't think I'm going to sit idly by while someone looking for help is being openly ill informed.

    There isn't a debate here. If you want to take nonsense cycling tradition (yes, I'll go there) and stubbornness over scientific fact that's one thing but the nutritional values are what they are.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Guys are we really suggesting that a milkshake or a ham sandwich is as nutritious as a tailor made protein+carb+amino acids product?

    From a recovery perspective, I don't think there is any evidence that a ham sandwich or a chocolate milkshake from Tesco is any less effective in the real world. Those items may not contain all the wizz-bang ingredients that the recovery shake has, but that doesn't mean you will necessarily recover any better using the shake.

    Recovery shakes are convenient and have their uses - but other methods can be just as viable.
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Imposter wrote:
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Guys are we really suggesting that a milkshake or a ham sandwich is as nutritious as a tailor made protein+carb+amino acids product?

    From a recovery perspective, I don't think there is any evidence that a ham sandwich or a chocolate milkshake from Tesco is any less effective in the real world. Those items may not contain all the wizz-bang ingredients that the recovery shake has, but that doesn't mean you will necessarily recover any better using the shake.

    Recovery shakes are convenient and have their uses - but other methods can be just as viable.


    Actually there is an absolute ton of evidence, what with sport science being a billion dollar industry for the past 20 years.

    Are we saying the glycogen replenishment window doesn't exist? How about good old basic macros? Are those nonsense too?

    Come one fella, you can't really believe a bloody tesco milkshake or ham sandwich is delivering your body the same nutrients as a specific recovery formula? Not to mention the absorption rates of those nutrients.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Actually there is an absolute ton of evidence, what with sport science being a billion dollar industry for the past 20 years.

    If you could point me towards some of this 'ton of evidence' I'd be keen to see it.
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Are we saying the glycogen replenishment window doesn't exist? How about good old basic macros? Are those nonsense too?

    Not saying that - and I didn't even imply it. In fact, I did say that recovery drinks are useful/convenient when time is short.
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Come one fella, you can't really believe a bloody tesco milkshake or ham sandwich is delivering your body the same nutrients as a specific recovery formula? Not to mention the absorption rates of those nutrients.

    'Belief' has nothing to do with it and absorption rates are only critical if time is limited. As I said earlier - if you have a 'ton of evidence' then let's see it. Meanwhile, I'll keep an open mind..
  • davebradswmb
    davebradswmb Posts: 475
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Guys are we really suggesting that a milkshake or a ham sandwich is as nutritious as a tailor made protein+carb+amino acids product?

    I mean, I really don't won't to get drawn into a debate on the subject but I don't think I'm going to sit idly by while someone looking for help is being openly ill informed.

    There isn't a debate here. If you want to take nonsense cycling tradition (yes, I'll go there) and stubbornness over scientific fact that's one thing but the nutritional values are what they are.
    Most people are able to get everything they need for recovery from normal food provided they can get to it soon enough. This isn't nonsence tradition but scientific fact. You will get all you need from simply eating some decent food after your ride, it may not be in the exact proportions but that doens't really matter, you will get more of everything than you actually need and your body will dispose/store the remainder.

    I know that this is posted in training, fitness and health, but there are few that will be reading this who are training at a high enough intensity in combination with a strict diet where these products are actually beneficial. These products have been designed for top athletes who have very different needs to the rest of us, but that isn't going to stop them promoting the products to the average sportsman. It's got to the point now where high-protein products are being sold as health products to ordinary supermarket shoppers.
  • These products have been designed for top athletes who have very different needs to the rest of us, but that isn't going to stop them promoting the products to the average sportsman. It's got to the point now where high-protein products are being sold as health products to ordinary supermarket shoppers.

    But isn't that the same with all these so called aids to training? Everyone seems obsessed by watts and power. They have meters and apps and all sorts of gear to measure, record and display the data. But in the real big wide world it means diddly squat. If a guy is "only" good enough for a 25 minute ride on his club evening 10 mile TT, then all the gear in the world ain't gonna get him anywhere near club, never mind comp, record. But we all dream and if it makes us feel good should we not indulge ourselves in our hobby?

    Dietary supplements are slightly different, but how much real benefit, as opposed to perceived benefit, is there? Yes science will come up with all sorts of charts and data, but how much of that is specifically related to your average bumbling plodder?

    I don't have any answers, just discussing things.
  • joenobody
    joenobody Posts: 563
    cowboyjon wrote:
    Actually there is an absolute ton of evidence, what with sport science being a billion dollar industry for the past 20 years.

    Are we saying the glycogen replenishment window doesn't exist? How about good old basic macros? Are those nonsense too?

    Come one fella, you can't really believe a bloody tesco milkshake or ham sandwich is delivering your body the same nutrients as a specific recovery formula? Not to mention the absorption rates of those nutrients.
    The problem is really about what the evidence is really showing. Mostly it's focused on elite athletes, rather than the average man on the street. Athletes whose needs are vastly different. Much of the money spent in the "billion dollar industry" is on marketing. As others have said, mostly you can just eat real food, as long as it's done at the right time (and even timing's not so much of a priority as you're led to believe - there's growing evidence that the glycogen/anabolic window isn't all that relevant after all). Macros don't need to be meticulously tracked, as long as you're getting an approximate balance (proportionally) of what you need.

    Take whey protein for example, this was a byproduct of the dairy industry that someone figured out could be repackaged and sold in to the fitness space. Yes, there's some benefit, but most benefit is found in extreme or edge cases, and your average athlete will generally get most, if not all, of their protein needs from regular eating. People now swear by it though, because they believe the hype.
  • joenobody
    joenobody Posts: 563
    But isn't that the same with all these so called aids to training? Everyone seems obsessed by watts and power. They have meters and apps and all sorts of gear to measure, record and display the data. But in the real big wide world it means diddly squat. If a guy is "only" good enough for a 25 minute ride on his club evening 10 mile TT, then all the gear in the world ain't gonna get him anywhere near club, never mind comp, record. But we all dream and if it makes us feel good should we not indulge ourselves in our hobby?

    Dietary supplements are slightly different, but how much real benefit, as opposed to perceived benefit, is there? Yes science will come up with all sorts of charts and data, but how much of that is specifically related to your average bumbling plodder?

    I don't have any answers, just discussing things.
    Largely, yes. At least with something like a powermeter, the average cyclist can put it to effective use, in supporting a structured training schedule. Whether the benefit justifies the cost is another matter though. And no-one is saying don't buy this stuff, just be aware that what it will do for you, and what you think it will do for you may not necessarily be the same thing. And I say this as an aero, deep section wheels, power meter bike rider, who likes protein shakes (I've just been for a run and will be having one shortly), who is definitely a distinctly average athlete (all the kit, still sh*t), but who has (some) money to splash around on this sort of thing.
  • Well, I'm an old man. Just had my 70th birthday. I have two damaged discs in my back and a replacement knee. I ride on my own, but have just come back from a 64 mile ride at 17mph. No power cranks, power meters or fancy apps on my handlebars. I try and ride as fast as I can. Road, traffic and weather conditions all play a part, but for who I am and where I am I think I'm doing OK. I try and remember to take Rego after my ride, but sometimes wifey makes a brew and a piece of cake.

    Will all the dietary supplements, expensive gear or convulted apps improve me a great deal? I'm already "better" than a lot of the club riders I see. Would their performance improve if they invested heavily? Are they bothered? Am I bothered?
    None of us will ever trouble the pro teams so all we are doing is massaging our egos. Nothing wrong with that, as long as it doesn't get out of hand.
  • cowboyjon
    cowboyjon Posts: 89
    Sone very interesting thoughts from clearly intelligent people who I have no doubt forgotten more about cycling than I care to know.

    Bit of a mixed bag though - whey protein being a scam tickles me for example, as does the apparent perception that striving to better your athletic ability in your chosen hobby is massaging your own ego.

    I get it guys, I really do. This seems to be somewhat of a generational thing, or maybe a cycling thing.

    I'm 39 years old and only been cycling a year, so while I basically know bugger all compared to all you chaps, I'm also not steeped in the coffee and cake cycling culture that I want no part of.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    cowboyjon wrote:
    I'm 39 years old and only been cycling a year, so while I basically know bugger all compared to all you chaps, I'm also not steeped in the coffee and cake cycling culture that I want no part of.

    The coffee/cake culture is a bit sh1t, I agree. That seems to be a relatively recent phenomenon, it wasn't always like that - not in my experience, anyway.
  • joey54321
    joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    What's wrong with enjoying cake?