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When should I replace chain and rear cassette

1964johnr1964johnr Posts: 258
edited January 2019 in Road general
Just clocked up 4,000 miles on my Ribble Granfondo. Just wondering if it's time to replace these parts or will they be okay for another few thousand miles. I have looked after them. Dry rides only, lubed and cleaned regularly. On Close inspection
I can't see any problems.
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  • 1964johnr wrote:
    Just clocked up 4,000 miles on my Ribble Granfondo. Just wondering if it's time to replace these parts or will they be okay for another few thousand miles. I have looked after them. Dry rides only, lubed and cleaned regularly. On Close inspection
    I can't see any problems.

    Get yourself one of these.

    https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-m ... ar-checker

    If it drops into the links on the chain on the ‘shorter’ side, think about a new chain. If it drops in on the ‘longer’ side, get a new chain. I replace my cassettes and chains at the same time, because you can’t teach an old cog new links. Chains and cassettes ‘mesh’ a new chain on an old cassette invariably leads to slippage.
  • As above with the chain checker, but you don't always have to replace the cassette whenever you do the chain.
  • Zendog1Zendog1 Posts: 816
    As a rule of thumb I replace the cassette every third chain.
  • In general there is no need to replace the cassette each time you replace the chain. They last longer. Ignore Tetra, this advice will just cost you money unnecessarily.

    In your case though I would have thought the chain should be on its way out, certainly my dry bike's chain would be after that distance. The problem you might face is that the worn chain might have prematurely worn the cassette too. I normally make sure I have a couple of chains and a spare cassette on hand just in case.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,085
    Chains and cassettes ‘mesh’ a new chain on an old cassette invariably leads to slippage.

    No they don't, ffs. Please keep your bullshit thoughts to yourself...
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 14,211
    Zendog1 wrote:
    As a rule of thumb I replace the cassette every third chain.
    And another one with the same schedule. FWIW, I put an "old" cassette on an old wheel to use on the turbo. No problems as yet so even 1/3 seems on the cautious side.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Try and get into the routine of checking your chain every month then you’ll be on top of any wear and hopefully you’ll not need to replace the cassette. If you ride 4000 miles before checking then you’ll certainly end up buying more cassettes that way long term.
    Luke
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904

    Get yourself one of these.

    https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bike-m ... ar-checker

    If it drops into the links on the chain on the ‘shorter’ side, think about a new chain. If it drops in on the ‘longer’ side, get a new chain.

    This is good advice
    I replace my cassettes and chains at the same time, because you can’t teach an old cog new links. Chains and cassettes ‘mesh’ a new chain on an old cassette invariably leads to slippage.

    This is complete b0llocks :roll:
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,085
    svetty wrote:
    I replace my cassettes and chains at the same time, because you can’t teach an old cog new links. Chains and cassettes ‘mesh’ a new chain on an old cassette invariably leads to slippage.

    This is complete b0llocks :roll:

    Welcome to groundhog day.

    Milemuncher/Bikergrovish/Bottom Briquettes/Killerclown and now Tetragrammaton (it's a Jewish reference to god, in case anyone is wondering - how modest) has a number of fixed mantras - and unfortunately this is one of them. All we can do is call him out on it and sooner or later the mods will get round to banning him again...before he rejoins with yet another new name and starts repeating the same bollox all over again...
  • On my 'general' and 'commuter' bikes I change the chain twice a year. On the 'general' bike this has meant never replacing the cassette yet after 6 years.
    2020 Metric Century Challenge Winner
  • Tetragrammaton1Tetragrammaton1 Posts: 72
    edited November 2018
    craigus89 wrote:
    As above with the chain checker, but you don't always have to replace the cassette whenever you do the chain.
    This is true, you don’t have to change them together. It’s best practice to do so if you can though.

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ). That’s because it’s well known ( by anyone who actually knows their onions ) that a new chain will slip if you use it on an old cassette, because the chain and cassette wear themselves in unison, and with a pattern, which a new chain will not have, unless the old chain has failed so soon after installation that it hasn’t had time to form the mesh with the original cassette ( which is a relatively rare occurrence). The new chain / old cassette may settle down after a short while, but at the expense of risking shortening the life of the new chain, whilst it’s meshing with the old cassette.
  • craigus89 wrote:
    As above with the chain checker, but you don't always have to replace the cassette whenever you do the chain.
    This is true, you don’t have to change them together. It’s best practice to do so if you can though.

    Absolute best practice would be to get a new bike every six months, or at least a full pro rebuild, but both those options are also entirely un-needed.
    2020 Metric Century Challenge Winner
  • carbonclem wrote:
    craigus89 wrote:
    As above with the chain checker, but you don't always have to replace the cassette whenever you do the chain.
    This is true, you don’t have to change them together. It’s best practice to do so if you can though.

    Absolute best practice would be to get a new bike every six months, or at least a full pro rebuild, but both those options are also entirely un-needed.

    Un-needed? Do you mean unnecessary?
  • Getting a new bike every six months certainly isn’t considered ‘best practice’ by anyone I know, changing the cassette and chain in unison certainly is.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,085

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.
    That’s because it’s well known ( by anyone who actually knows their onions ) that a new chain will slip if you use it on an old cassette, because the chain and cassette wear themselves in unison, and with a pattern, which a new chain will not have, unless the old chain has failed so soon after installation that it hasn’t had time to form the mesh with the original cassette ( which is a relatively rare occurrence). The new chain / old cassette may settle down after a short while, but at the expense of risking shortening the life of the new chain, whilst it’s meshing with the old cassette.

    This is simply not true. Whoever 'knows their onions' - it certainly isn't you. The saddest and most tragic part of all this is that you actually think you do...
  • carbonclem wrote:
    craigus89 wrote:
    As above with the chain checker, but you don't always have to replace the cassette whenever you do the chain.
    This is true, you don’t have to change them together. It’s best practice to do so if you can though.

    Absolute best practice would be to get a new bike every six months, or at least a full pro rebuild, but both those options are also entirely un-needed.

    Un-needed? Do you mean unnecessary?

    Your advice is both, take your pick :lol:
    2020 Metric Century Challenge Winner
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,085
    carbonclem wrote:

    Your advice is both, take your pick :lol:

    You don't have to do it - but you do have to do it.. ;)
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,170
    I usually change my cassette every time milemuncher posts some advice that is correct.
    I can’t remember the last time I changed one.
  • Cretin. I suppose you change your chain rings too then?
  • I’ve always maintained my chain & cassette to a high standard and kept a close eye on chain wear using an indicator therefore reducing any chance to cause damage to the cassette. This way I can replace my chain at least 3 times before considering replacing the cassette. A chain is a consumable component.
  • I don't know if the supplied chain was made of cheese, or the Progold Prolink lube I was using back then was coming off the chain far quicker than I realised, or a bit of both... But the first chain on my Voodoo was shot after ~500 miles from Feb-Sept a few years back.
    The replacement kmc has lasted just over two years and ~4000 miles and only now is on the verge of needing a change, but over that period I also bought a bargain basement 1 litre of Much Off C3 Ceramic Wet lube for ~£7 from PX, which will last me decades! :shock: :lol:

    The Cube got its first chain replacement after ~19 months a few weekends back, after ~5000 dry miles. I decided to fit the spare 11-32 cassette at the same time, mainly because I had some short term chain noise when I used the old chain with a different new cassette fitted to the new turbo last Xmas.
    Kept hold of the old cassette, needs a little clean and I'll probably fit it to the original Cube wheels, or alternatively I could fit it to a spare 11-speed fat wheel for the Voodoo and then source other components to upgrade the drivetrain.
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo
  • Getting a new bike every six months certainly isn’t considered ‘best practice’ by anyone I know, changing the cassette and chain in unison certainly is.

    Actually, getting a new bike every 6 months is considered best practice, at least by me, as i've just ordered one today.


    Getting back to the theme, everyone else is correct on this thread, there is no need to replace a cassette with each chain and like others mine last 3 chains. The chain doesn't even wear into the shape of the cassette teeth. For a start they also run over the chain ring teeth which retain their original shape for an eon. In fact the chain contact point is circular and revolves around the pin wearing evenly on the outside and retaining it's circular shape. So it can't shape itself to the cassette. The wear and 'stretching' of the chain isn't acually stretching but the wear of the contact pin of the chain roller against the pin on it's internal side. The cumulative effect of every pin wearing is to lengthen the chain. If everything is kept clean and lubricated then it last for yonks. The cassette only needs to change when the teeth hook.
  • figbatfigbat Posts: 680
    Imposter wrote:

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.

    Out of interest I just Googled the phrase "you can't teach a old cog new links". Three hits. One is this thread and the other two are threads on Cycling UK by one Marcus Aurelius. That's damn near folklore.
    Cube Reaction GTC Pro 29 for the lumpy stuff
    Cannondale Synapse alloy with 'guards for the winter roads
    Fuji Altamira 2.7 for the summer roads
    Trek 830 Mountain Track frame turned into a gravel bike - for anywhere & everywhere
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,085
    figbat wrote:
    Imposter wrote:

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.

    Out of interest I just Googled the phrase "you can't teach a old cog new links". Three hits. One is this thread and the other two are threads on Cycling UK by one Marcus Aurelius. That's damn near folklore.

    Honestly, you couldn't make this stuff up. Oh hang on, he did.. :lol:
  • step83step83 Posts: 4,018
    bondurant wrote:
    Cretin. I suppose you change your chain rings too then?

    Plus new cleats every ride. wear an tear you know.
  • figbat wrote:
    Imposter wrote:

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.

    Out of interest I just Googled the phrase "you can't teach a old cog new links". Three hits. One is this thread and the other two are threads on Cycling UK by one Marcus Aurelius. That's damn near folklore.

    Brilliant :D
  • Anybody with any actual experience of how chain and cassette changes work would know, that ( as I’ve tried to tell the clueless on this thread ) if you change a chain, and it’s done a bit of work, the new chain will invariably slip, unless you change the cassette at the same time ( for reasons I stated ). The fact certain bits of this site seems to be universally inhabited, by people with seemingly no actual experience of the subject under discussion, ain’t my problem.
  • Tetragrammaton1Tetragrammaton1 Posts: 72
    edited November 2018
    figbat wrote:
    Imposter wrote:

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.

    Out of interest I just Googled the phrase "you can't teach a old cog new links". Three hits. One is this thread and the other two are threads on Cycling UK by one Marcus Aurelius. That's damn near folklore.

    Wow, Google said something ( which wasn’t what you lied about above ) If you actually did any riding, you’d hear that phrase, from experienced riders, but that would require you to actually do some riding, not sitting around Googling stuff.
  • Tetragrammaton1Tetragrammaton1 Posts: 72
    edited November 2018
    bondurant wrote:
    Cretin. I suppose you change your chain rings too then?

    Why would I do that? Don’t you realise that the frequency of changes between rings is nearly always, way way less than the changing between sprockets, and therefore the rings don’t wear anything like as much as the sprockets?
  • figbat wrote:
    Imposter wrote:

    Why do you think the saying “you can’t teach an old cog new links” is used ( by a lot of experienced riders ).

    Nobody says that - you just made it up to suit your delusional confirmation bias.

    Out of interest I just Googled the phrase "you can't teach a old cog new links". Three hits. One is this thread and the other two are threads on Cycling UK by one Marcus Aurelius. That's damn near folklore.

    If anyone wants to try Googling the phrase ‘you can’t teach an old cog new links’ please do, you’ll see that this guy is wrong / lying ( surprisingly). You’ll get a suggestion for “did you mean, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks “. Followed by hundreds of links for that phrase. If you insist on “you can’t teach an old cog new links” you’ll get the same result. So why he posted the rubbish he posted about getting 3 results, and what they were, is beyond me.
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