Forum home Road cycling forum The cake stop

Maybe we are not doomed after all

18911131416

Posts

  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,167
    edited October 2020

    One of the many things I hate about batteries is quoting size by power. Does it hold enough to produce 100 MW for 5 mins, 1 hour, 1 day etc.
    I am glad someone has noticed this. I was beginning to doubt myself. To describe a battery as 100MW is totally meaningless. A Megawatt is a unit of power. A battery stores energy. It needs to be measured in megawatt hours.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182

    rjsterry said:

    The battery thing is interesting.

    Why try to build a few "Mega Batteries"? Why not have smaller ones at the point of use, in houses?

    I am also of the opinion that household wind turbines, rather than windfarms could work

    Unfortunately, people don't build houses where its windy enough to make turbines worthwhile.
    You've obviously never visited me
    Yes I should have qualified that as "not many people..."
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    rjsterry said:

    rjsterry said:

    The battery thing is interesting.

    Why try to build a few "Mega Batteries"? Why not have smaller ones at the point of use, in houses?

    I am also of the opinion that household wind turbines, rather than windfarms could work

    Unfortunately, people don't build houses where its windy enough to make turbines worthwhile.
    You've obviously never visited me
    Yes I should have qualified that as "not many people..."
    What, you suggesting that not many people are going to visit me? :/

    Oh, hang on...
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 2,465
    lesfirth said:

    One of the many things I hate about batteries is quoting size by power. Does it hold enough to produce 100 MW for 5 mins, 1 hour, 1 day etc.
    I am glad someone has noticed this. I was beginning to doubt myself. To describe a battery as 100MW is totally meaningless. A Megawatt is a unit of power. A battery stores energy. It needs to be measured in megawatt hours.
    I linked the article if you want to learn more.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    I posted this before, but it shows possible additional electrical demands between now and 2050.



    image.png

  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,674
    Don't worry, remember that practicable fusion has always been 30 years off, so 2050 should be sorted
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    Some 2020 highlights stolen from elsewhere

    Ded 25th
    First ever coal free Christmas Day electricity production
    Dec 18
    Highest ever level of wind power (17.2GW)
    Aug 26
    Highest ever share of wind power (59.9%)
    May 30
    Highest ever share of solar power (34%)
    May 24
    Lowest ever carbon intensity (46 gCO2/kWh)
    May
    Greenest month on record (143 gCO2/kWh)
    Apr 20
    Highest ever level of solar power (9.7GW)
    Apr 10 - Jun 16
    Longest ever GB coal-free period

    Total coal-free hours: 5,147 hours
  • piker2piker2 Posts: 47
    They look like good headlines . However
    January 18 2021 8.00pm
    At this moment in time more than half of our electricity is being generated by burning fossil fuels, including some coal.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,167
    Has anyone else been looking at Gridwatch. co.uk?
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    piker2 said:

    They look like good headlines . However
    January 18 2021 8.00pm
    At this moment in time more than half of our electricity is being generated by burning fossil fuels, including some coal.

    About half. Rome wasn't built in a day.
  • ProssPross Posts: 28,325
    If only we could harness energy from falling rain. The grid would be surging over the next few days.
  • elbowlohelbowloh Posts: 6,239
    lesfirth said:

    Has anyone else been looking at Gridwatch. co.uk?

    Yeah, it's not a patch on Springwatch. Haven't seen a single fecking rabbit or chick.
    Felt F1 2014
    Felt Z6 2012
    Red Arthur Caygill steel frame
    Tall....
    www.seewildlife.co.uk
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 2,465
    Pross said:

    If only we could harness energy from falling rain. The grid would be surging over the next few days.

    A solar panel that can generate electricity from falling raindrops has been invented, enabling power to flow even when skies cloud over or the sun has set.

    Solar power installation is soaring globally thanks to costs plunging 90% in the past decade, making it the cheapest electricity in many parts of the world. But the power output can plummet under grey skies and researchers are working to squeeze even more electricity from panels.

    The new device, demonstrated in a laboratory at Soochow University in China, places two transparent polymer layers on top of a solar photovoltaic (PV) cell. When raindrops fall on to the layers and then roll off, the friction generates a static electricity charge.

    “Our device can always generate electricity in any daytime weather,” said Baoquan Sun, at Soochow University. “In addition, this device even provides electricity at night if there is rain.”

    Other researchers have recently created similar devices on solar panels, known as triboelectric nanogenerators (Tengs), but the new design is significantly simpler and more efficient as one of the polymer layers acts as the electrode for both the Teng and the solar cell.


    The usual thing applies, it doesn't mean much until it can be mass produced at a reasonable price.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    Pross said:

    If only we could harness energy from falling rain. The grid would be surging over the next few days.

    There are a few hydro projects, but not many.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,885

    Pross said:

    If only we could harness energy from falling rain. The grid would be surging over the next few days.

    There are a few hydro projects, but not many.
    NIMBYs tend to object to being flooded. 😉
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182
    edited 3 July
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182
    Also spotted somewhere: when we all stop heating our homes and water with gas, what will we do with the tonnes of copper and steel piping?
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 42,092
    Make Whisky stills and moonshine.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182
    This is hugely good news.



    77% efficacy!
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,167
    This is not the best thread for this.
    I agree that it is good news. However this thread started as a discussion on the use of fossil fuels to generate electricity and the consequent Co2 warming the planet.
    The wonderful work the medical profession does will only increase the world population and the demand for even more power generation.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    rjsterry said:

    This is hugely good news.



    77% efficacy!
    It would be interesting to know how it works given it is a fight against parasites rather than a virus.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    To keep @lesfirth happy, Vestas have launched a 15MW wind turbine with a 236m diameter.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182

    rjsterry said:

    This is hugely good news.



    77% efficacy!
    It would be interesting to know how it works given it is a fight against parasites rather than a virus.
    Basic explanation here.

    https://www.ox.ac.uk/news/2019-06-13-identification-protective-antibodies-may-be-key-malaria-vaccine
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    Thanks. Interesting.
  • ProssPross Posts: 28,325

    To keep @lesfirth happy, Vestas have launched a 15MW wind turbine with a 236m diameter.

    I assume that's offshore? I'm currently managing a wind turbine scheme and having to sort out the transporting of the blade and tower the 4 or 5 miles from port to site. The vehicles is over 40m long and the blade extends over the rear quite a way so over 3 times the length of a maximum legal size artic. Looking at the vehicle swept paths is scary, there are several sets of traffic lights that have to be removed along with other bits of street furnitureand also plate some pavements and verges so they can be driven over. It must be a pretty stressful job for the people driving / controlling the rear axles!
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256
    Yes, offshore. That's one of the advantages of offshore. The obvious disadvantage being the transmission cable.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,182
    Pross said:

    To keep @lesfirth happy, Vestas have launched a 15MW wind turbine with a 236m diameter.

    I assume that's offshore? I'm currently managing a wind turbine scheme and having to sort out the transporting of the blade and tower the 4 or 5 miles from port to site. The vehicles is over 40m long and the blade extends over the rear quite a way so over 3 times the length of a maximum legal size artic. Looking at the vehicle swept paths is scary, there are several sets of traffic lights that have to be removed along with other bits of street furnitureand also plate some pavements and verges so they can be driven over. It must be a pretty stressful job for the people driving / controlling the rear axles!
    There was much the same for the tunnel boring machine on that documentary the other day.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 56,018 Lives Here
    edited 29 July
    https://capx.co/what-we-get-wrong-about-going-green/

    This is quite good on "going green".

    Basically that our instincts on what is green and what isn't are rarely right - and it's rational to be ignorant of that.
  • JezyboyJezyboy Posts: 822
    edited 29 July

    https://capx.co/what-we-get-wrong-about-going-green/

    This is quite good on "going green".

    Basically that our instincts on what is green and what isn't are rarely right - and it's rational to be ignorant of that.

    It feels like someone who has just found out about life cycle analysis and couldn't wait to try and use it.

    It's good, but it would be better if they showed the full working on some of the statements, rather than just quote a line from the executive summary.
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,256

    https://capx.co/what-we-get-wrong-about-going-green/

    This is quite good on "going green".

    Basically that our instincts on what is green and what isn't are rarely right - and it's rational to be ignorant of that.

    The confusion is around around the different environmental factors involved. Being green might mean not polluting rivers, but it also means carbon reduction. Sometimes there is a conflict being all these different elements.
Sign In or Register to comment.