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Can anyone here drink while on rollers?

andyebandyeb Posts: 407
Been using rollers for a couple of months, have noticed a huge improvement in my pedal stroke and feel fairly comfortable riding on them - I'm now able to relax my arms and upper body and drive through my core and hips to stabilise the bike. I don't have to look forward any more and can keep my balance when looking at the back wheel to check sideways play and hence improve my pedal stroke. I can spin up to 120 RPM without feeling like I'm going to leap off the front of the rollers (vs. a much more lumpy 190 RPM on the turbo).

However, despite plenty of roller practice sessions, I still haven't managed to master drinking from a bottle while riding on them - as soon as I reach for the bottle (whether it's in a bottle cage, or even on the table beside me), I loose my balance and have to give up and take avoiding action.

This is limiting the length of my workouts and in some instances even causing dehydration headaches - I'm a heavy drinker and normally sip every few minutes when on the turbo. I've tried stopping every 20 minutes for a big drink, but this isn't proving adequate and breaks my rhythm.

Ultimately, my goal is to match this feat of cooking an omlette while on rollers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybFvomdhW2Y

...however drinking would be a good, and rather more practical, starting point. :lol:

So - can anyone else here drink while riding rollers? Any tips on how to get to that point?

I've thought about using my MTB hydration pack, but don't really want weight on my back pulling my riding position out of shape and contributing further to getting too hot and sweaty, despite using a fan.

thanks,

Andrew
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Posts

  • DCDBDCDB Posts: 27
    Hi Andrew,

    Simple answer to your question is yes; it is possible to drink whilst on the rollers (and ride no handed to practice taking off a jacket, etc). To start with I too found it very diffcult/impossible to reach for the bottle without leaping off the side of the rollers. I started from my most comfortable position on the bike (on the hoods) and taught myself to be able to ride one handed whilst holding a steady pace. I also used the original learning environment of having a doorway to lean against if it went wrong. From there I practiced leaning down to touch the bottle without actually grabbing it. Once comfortable with that, I then started taking the bottle out. The hardest part I found was actually putting the bottle back without missing the cage. I still have to focus on the task but I can now get a drink from pretty much any of the normal cycle positions (drops, tops or hoods) without an excursion into the furniture.

    As a result of being able to move my body around the bike whilst 'in motion' it also improved my confidence in shifting my weight and I can now ride for reasonable periods on the rollers with no hands on the bars. Just takes time to get comfortable at holding a steady candence and accepting that you may leave the rollers whilst you are learning.

    Try peddling out of the saddle and see what happens then! Still yet to get a few turns in before I either go off the back or the front!
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,027
    No it isnt that easy.
    Use a bottle that doesnt have a close off valve like a Camelbak may help.
    Comfortable one handed?
    Best actually to keep looking forward anyways despite wanting to glance downwards.
    Trying to reach for something whilst on the rollers is the bit that can really go wrong as you know.
    You are probably 95% there so just keep at it.
  • Omar LittleOmar Little Posts: 2,040
    It is quite a bit easier to ride no handed on the rollers than it is to ride one handed, so perhaps until you get the technique sorted for reaching down for your bottle with one hand still on the bars you could put a bottle in your rear pocket and when you need a drink sit up and ride no handed and take it from the pocket and have your drink put it back in your pocket then after that put both hands on the bars again.
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    Thanks guys. I also wondered about whether it's even possible to ride out of the saddle on rollers. At the moment even shifting around on the saddle is pretty touch-and-go.

    I also wondered about the no-hands thing - as the young lady in the above video seems to make it look so easy. I can loosen my grip on the handlebars to the point my hands are just resting there and stay relaxed, but any further and I start loosing my balance and have to put a major power burst down to keep my balance.

    So I think the step-by-step approach of getting to the point of being able to touch the bottle, then slightly dislodge it, then remove it, but stop to replace etc. Also thinking that practising with an empty bottle might be easier than even a half full one, which is what I've tried to date.

    So far (and I'm probably tempting fate by saying this), I've not come off the rollers at all, but still always have a wall to my right hand side, as I need it to get started. I reckon I've probably spent a total of about 10 hours on the rollers so far.

    Always wonder how people manage to get started without having something to hold on to. All my googling on the subject just turns up entry-level getting started guides, rather than showing how to get going on rollers unaided.

    Any further ideas or suggestions would be very welcome. Thanks again for all the advice and suggestions so far.
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 6,327
    I'm not great on rollers but I can ride no handed, one footed, drink and out of the saddle. It's just a case of practice and relax. Some of our youth riders who do shedloads of roller work are exceptional but like anything the more you practice the better you get. If you are nervous try riding in trainers that way it's quicker to get a foot down.
    AFC Mercia women - sign for us
  • Yes, but I do have to concentrate a little harder when I go to put the bottle back in the cage!

    It's all down to practicing and spending more time on the rollers. :)
  • Tom DeanTom Dean Posts: 1,723
    Make sure your rollers are set up correctly to the wheelbase of your bike - a small difference can have a big effect on stability.
  • colinsmith123colinsmith123 Posts: 579
    I can drink whilst on the rollers, the barman doesn't like it though. He says that after 4 pints I get a bit larey.

    I'll get my coat :lol:
    Live to ski
    Ski to live
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    OK a bit of progress to report. Today I managed to progress from touching the bottle, to getting an empty bottle in/out of the cage, to actually taking a drink with a tiny bit of fluid in the bottom of the bottle. Only one hair raising moment too...

    Find it's much easier on the hoods. Still a long way from being able to ride no-handed though.

    So you've all convinced me it is in fact possible to drink on rollers and I'm confident I'll get there with some more practice.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,027
    I cant be bothered with practising no handed.. would take too many hours.. but riding out of the saddle is very useful to aid comfort.
    This took a bit to get there but well worth it.
    I nudged the front roller slightly so that the front hub is only just behind the centre line of the roller... gives just a touch more stability when all the bodyweight is on the front end.
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    jgsi wrote:
    I cant be bothered with practising no handed.. would take too many hours.. but riding out of the saddle is very useful to aid comfort.
    This took a bit to get there but well worth it.
    I nudged the front roller slightly so that the front hub is only just behind the centre line of the roller... gives just a touch more stability when all the bodyweight is on the front end.

    Agreed - I was expecting that rollers would be more bearable from a saddle comfort point of view than the turbo. But the reverse has actually proved true - at the moment I'm very limited on the amount I can move around on the saddle and being able to even un-weight myself on the saddle would be an improvement in workouts like 2x20m etc.
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    Quick update - having mastered drinking, I've now moved on to learn riding out of the saddle.

    I was able to do this by first learning to completely un-weight my backside on the saddle and getting steady/comfortable doing this for 30 second intervals, then gradually raising the amount I am out of the saddle until I'm up to full height.

    The tricky part is standing up and sitting back down. Dropping two gears also helps. I have a hunch it might be easier if I added the optional resistance unit to my rollers.
  • Quick update - having mastered drinking, I've now moved on to learn riding out of the saddle.
    Has anyone experienced increased knee stress when attempting to ride out of the saddle on rollers? I started trying to stand on my rollers two winters ago and coincidentally, my right knee has started to have issues about the same time. Perhaps the two are unrelated, but I find that whenever I stand on the rollers, my knees aren't very happy about it. I certainly can't ride naturally out of the saddle on rollers, it's always a bit awkward.

    Although I like how rollers seem to improve technique, the many difficulties they create have had me thinking about switching back to a regular trainer. I can't justify the price of the "floating" rollers (like this one) that apparently make it easier to ride out of the saddle. :|
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    Quick update - having mastered drinking, I've now moved on to learn riding out of the saddle.
    Has anyone experienced increased knee stress when attempting to ride out of the saddle on rollers? I started trying to stand on my rollers two winters ago and coincidentally, my right knee has started to have issues about the same time. Perhaps the two are unrelated, but I find that whenever I stand on the rollers, my knees aren't very happy about it. I certainly can't ride naturally out of the saddle on rollers, it's always a bit awkward.

    Although I like how rollers seem to improve technique, the many difficulties they create have had me thinking about switching back to a regular trainer. I can't justify the price of the "floating" rollers (like this one) that apparently make it easier to ride out of the saddle. :|

    I felt more stress in my thighs while riding out of the saddle but not knees particularly.

    Maybe take a look at cleat setup and/or bike fit in general?
  • pinnopinno Posts: 40,147
    I managed to put a dent in the sink unit, then demolish a laundry rack and on the 3rd occasion, I gave up learning to ride on rollers. As both my hips have been replaced, I figured that I may do some serious damage in the process of learning how to ride on them. So I bought one of these and never looked back:

    71vuWFIYeDL._SL1500_.jpg

    Okay, i'm not getting the core stability and balance benefits, there are plenty of exercises to improve these attributes such as balancing and doing exercises on a fit ball as well as the 'plank'.
    You can eat, drink, operate the TV remote, scratch, wipe the sweat off...

    Despite the 'T' bar, it has improved my pedalling no end and I would never ever contemplate getting another one of those god forbidden torture device again - a Turbo trainer.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    Have a watch and weep.

    http://youtu.be/ybFvomdhW2Y
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    Have a watch and weep.

    http://youtu.be/ybFvomdhW2Y

    Yah - I linked to that in the original post. Some way to go yet...
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,443
    It might depend on the rollers too.

    Mine are homemade, heavy and take a bit more turning than commercial ones in that they have some resistance. Whilst I can drink no problem (from a cup), change channels on the tv, and stand (pointless becuase the back wheel then slips), I can't do 'no hands' unless I'm holding onto something else. The something else being the shed roof spars.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,027
    It might depend on the rollers too.

    Mine are homemade, heavy and take a bit more turning than commercial ones in that they have some resistance. Whilst I can drink no problem (from a cup), change channels on the tv, and stand (pointless becuase the back wheel then slips), I can't do 'no hands' unless I'm holding onto something else. The something else being the shed roof spars.

    You actually built some like the GCN guys using rolling pins...? :-)
    I do like my Arion rollers... if use my race tubs then it is an almost silent training experience.
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,443

    You actually built some like the GCN guys using rolling pins...? :-)
    I do like my Arion rollers... if use my race tubs then it is an almost silent training experience.

    No not with rolling pins :D Actually they were some conveyor belt rollers, and they had motors in which I had to remove.

    DSC_8215.jpg?t=1434199537

    This is my youngest having a go on them outside (photo cropped to remove faces).


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • pinnopinno Posts: 40,147

    You...experience.

    No not with rolling pins :D Actually they were some conveyor belt rollers, and they had motors in which I had to remove.

    Yeah, right.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    While we are on the subject of getting competent on rollers, how do you make the transition from having to lean against something to get going at the start of your session and being able to start from cold with no side support?

    Has anyone seen a video of how it's done? Searching online just gets you lots of beginner tutorial videos with help on how to get started when leaning on something.
  • pastryboypastryboy Posts: 1,385
    I would be interest to know that as well. I can do no handed, one legged, etc. and can get off fine but not sure how to start without something at the side.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,027
    Use an easy gear... Elite rollers you can get a plastic step to clip onto the side of the rollers so you can start 1 legged to spin up... carrying enough speed you then just have a few seconds to get the other foot clipped in.
    Needs a bit of practise.
  • damocles10damocles10 Posts: 340
    Only wine....

    I was going to get rollers and use them on my roof terrace ( 5 floors )...A mate talked me out of it as I might fly off the building. Got a Tacx virtual trainer instead.
  • pastryboypastryboy Posts: 1,385
    I've come off my rollers when I was doing 45mph. It's not possible to 'fly off' other than sideways.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 40,147
    I've come off my rollers when I was doing 45mph. It's not possible to 'fly off' other than sideways.

    My kitchen sink and the laundry rack will testify to that. It sure does censored up your rhythm stopping dead at that speed.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • mamba80mamba80 Posts: 5,032
    I would be interest to know that as well. I can do no handed, one legged, etc. and can get off fine but not sure how to start without something at the side.

    i just push down hard in big ring middle of cassette and then just start pedalling, with one foot clipped in the other jut pushing down on the pedal, clip in once up to speed, you just need to be confident in your balance.
  • andyebandyeb Posts: 407
    I'm getting the hang of this now - roughly as mamba80 suggests.

    The trick seems to be to start with the bike in the middle of the rollers, leaning slightly towards the side where you have your foot down. Then as you push down with your other leg, steer the bike towards the side where you have your foot down, so that it becomes upright underneath you. This seems to help with achieving balance.

    It also seems to help to practice the starts - just get the hang of doing a big push with one leg and balancing while coasting for as long as possible.
  • Personally I have mine beside the fridge, eblow on the side of the fridge until I get up to speed then away, pretty easy really. Unlike when I tried to do it alongside a bench which just didn't work at all!
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