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What do you carry with you on every ride?

gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
edited February 2015 in Road beginners
I'm new to road riding, having ridden an MTB in the past, and so I have been used to either carrying a ruck sack or stuffing a saddle bag full of kit/tools etc.

What is the bare minimum that you would take on a 2-3 hour ride?

I'm guessing:
1-2 spare tubes
puncture kit
levers
multi-tool
CO2/pump

Have I missed anything?
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Posts

  • TjgoodhewTjgoodhew Posts: 628
    On top of that:

    Some food or a gel. 9/10 times it comes back with me uneaten but you never know when the hunger knock will get you.
    Some cash for emergencies
    ID
    Cannondale Caad8
    Canyon Aeroad 8.0

    http://www.strava.com/athletes/goodhewt
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    Ah yes, I forgot food - but that would go in my Tri-Bag I have on the top tube, along with phone and wallet. Was more thinking of tools/emergency kit etc.
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back
  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    gcwebbyuk wrote:
    Ah yes, I forgot food - but that would go in my Tri-Bag I have on the top tube, along with phone and wallet. Was more thinking of tools/emergency kit etc.

    You riding a tourer? The list of stuff you need (which is yours + an energy bar/food, a £10 or £20 note and your phone) can all go in your jersey pockets or in a decent undersaddle bag.
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • lostboysaintlostboysaint Posts: 4,252
    That's the cycling equivalent of a man-bag! Just get the stuff in your jersey pockets!
    Trail fun - Transition Bandit
    Road - Wilier Izoard Centaur/Cube Agree C62 Disc
    Allround - Cotic Solaris
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    Oh, I have one of them too ;)

    The tri-bag has come in handy while on my turbo trainer, but agree it is probably a bit o.t.t. for the road...
  • Dippydog3Dippydog3 Posts: 414
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back

    I used to do that as well, which is a pain as they arent small.

    Then someone told me how to pull the chain around the bottom of the chainring so a one link triangle is formed on top. Tap it with a multi tool and it comes apart. Even if its an eleven speed one.
  • ben@31[email protected] Posts: 2,322
    edited January 2015
    Mobile phone. Fully charged. And with maps.
    Money
    Jelly Babies (i'm powered by them)
    Mini CO2 cylinder tyre inflator
    Puncture repair kit
    Inner tube
    Sometimes a multi-tool

    This time of the year...
    Balaclava
    Glasses
    Reflectives
    Front and rear light, always fully charged after every ride, fitted to bike 24/7

    Wearing winter gloves rather than mitts. Soft shell jacket over long sleeve winter jersey. Full length bib tights. Merino wool socks. Neoprine overshoe covers. Buff around neck or balaclava.

    *Note, Despite carrying the puncture repair kit, my Ultremo tyres are a B*****d to change on my campag wheels inside a nice warm well illuminated house, so I don't fancy my chances changing them in the dark and poor weather and with cold numb hands. I will phone for a taxi instead.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
  • Dippydog3Dippydog3 Posts: 414
    Your list is almost the same as mine.
    No chain tool as above.
    I dont bother with a puncture kit, just a couple of those slap on patches instead.
    The multitool has tyre levers built in but I never use them. Learn to get the tyre off and on with your hands only.
    And a pair of disposable latex gloves.
    And a Leatherman Squirt PS4. If I do puncture around here its normally a very small sharp stone and they can be a devil to get out of the tyre.
  • gcwebbyukgcwebbyuk Posts: 1,926
    My current multi-tool is a Specialized EMT - so has a mini chain device built in. I forgot to mention a couple of spare chain links (was carrying 9-speed SRAM powerlinks for MTB, but will get some 11-speed KMC links for the road bike).

    I also had an el-cheapo Tesco's equivalent to a Leatherman, but it weighs probably more than the rest of my kit put together, will probably leave that one behind.
  • meanredspidermeanredspider Posts: 12,550
    Chain tool and spare link. I'm not sure what people will do if their chain snaps. It's not happened to me fully but it's game over if it does.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • Same as you +food, £20 for emergencies in its own plastic bag, between £5 and £20 (in notes) spends if I ever fancy stopping off for a coffee and cake maybe, my phone (which is my bike computer anyway) and some disposable gloves.
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    Dippydog3 wrote:
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back

    I used to do that as well, which is a pain as they arent small.

    Then someone told me how to pull the chain around the bottom of the chainring so a one link triangle is formed on top. Tap it with a multi tool and it comes apart. Even if its an eleven speed one.

    I've just got a cheap one that came in a basic tool kit I bought when I started riding (Topeak I think), does the job and dismantles into pieces that are fairly easy to slot into a seatpack.

    Intrigued by the chainring trick though, can't quite picture it, will have to have a play in the shed tomorrow...
  • Dippydog3Dippydog3 Posts: 414
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Dippydog3 wrote:
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back

    I used to do that as well, which is a pain as they arent small.

    Then someone told me how to pull the chain around the bottom of the chainring so a one link triangle is formed on top. Tap it with a multi tool and it comes apart. Even if its an eleven speed one.

    I've just got a cheap one that came in a basic tool kit I bought when I started riding (Topeak I think), does the job and dismantles into pieces that are fairly easy to slot into a seatpack.

    Intrigued by the chainring trick though, can't quite picture it, will have to have a play in the shed tomorrow...
    This pictures it for you.

    http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/member/201107050_0.pdf
  • JackPozziJackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    Dippydog3 wrote:
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Dippydog3 wrote:
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back

    I used to do that as well, which is a pain as they arent small.

    Then someone told me how to pull the chain around the bottom of the chainring so a one link triangle is formed on top. Tap it with a multi tool and it comes apart. Even if its an eleven speed one.

    I've just got a cheap one that came in a basic tool kit I bought when I started riding (Topeak I think), does the job and dismantles into pieces that are fairly easy to slot into a seatpack.

    Intrigued by the chainring trick though, can't quite picture it, will have to have a play in the shed tomorrow...
    This pictures it for you.

    http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/member/201107050_0.pdf

    Thanks for the link, looks like it's only for getting quick links open though? I carry the chain tool in case a normal link gets churned up, so I can remove the damaged link and replace or just make do with a slightly shorter chain to get home.
  • Dippydog3Dippydog3 Posts: 414
    Sorry, I thought you meant quick links. Absolutely need a chain tool and a quicklink. Good multitools all have them.
  • Topeak mini tool
    Tube
    Co2 inflater
    two tyre levers
    phone
    cash
    food.

    All in pockets. I`m not hanging a bag off my artwork saddle.
    Trek,,,, too cool for school ,, apparently
  • i take with me in my jersey;

    2 tubes, pump, co2 pump and a spare cannister, 2 tyre levers, multitool, 2 medium flapjacks, phone, debit card and a tenner normally just in case.
    on longer rides i normally stop at a supermarket and top up my bottles.

    all fits ok in my rear pockets.

    if the weather is changeable i can normally stuff a gilet in a pocket too
    Cube Cross 2016
    Willier GTR 2014
  • Mobile phone
    Cash
    Water
    Inner tube
    Tire levers
    Screwdriver
    Adjustable spanner
    Cable ties
    Pump
    Water bottle
  • 3 tubes
    Lezyne minitool
    Quick link chain fixer
    3 Co2
    Tyre boot
    Plastic gloves
    On group rides will take a universal rear hanger replacement
    Stored in bottle cage.
  • holiverholiver Posts: 800
    I think most people have covered the essentials. However, I also carry a bit of paper that says what to do incase of an accident and some ID that gives emergency contact information.
  • Chunky101Chunky101 Posts: 108
    1x tube
    1x self adhesive patch pack
    1x multi tool with 1x cleat bolt, 2x cable tie, 1x chain link, £20 note stuffed in
    1x tyre lever
    1x compact pump
    2x CO2 shells and 1x valve
    2x latex gloves with the above stuffed in (keeps hands clean and a valuable backup if temps drop below zero)
    Energy bar and gels
    1x more energy bar and gel than I think I'll need
  • How many more times is this topic going to surface.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 1,002
    Nothing bar a winning smile and a certain joi de vivre.
    Insert bike here:
  • How many more times is this topic going to surface.

    Surely there is a limit to how much you can discuss about a bike. Then you have to go back to old topics eventually. You might even find technology / ideas have evolved since the last time.

    Don't like the thread? Don't open it.
    "The Prince of Wales is now the King of France" - Calton Kirby
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,161
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Dippydog3 wrote:
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Chain link tool (if there's not one on the multi-tool) - Lesson learnt after an unfortunate incident some years back

    I used to do that as well, which is a pain as they arent small.

    Then someone told me how to pull the chain around the bottom of the chainring so a one link triangle is formed on top. Tap it with a multi tool and it comes apart. Even if its an eleven speed one.

    I've just got a cheap one that came in a basic tool kit I bought when I started riding (Topeak I think), does the job and dismantles into pieces that are fairly easy to slot into a seatpack.

    Intrigued by the chainring trick though, can't quite picture it, will have to have a play in the shed tomorrow...

    This http://www.ctc.org.uk/file/member/201107050_0.pdf
  • About twenty pounds of excess fat :(
    Still thinking of something clever to say!
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