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Fully rigid MTB

rubezrubez Posts: 323
edited April 2016 in MTB buying advice
Hi, are there any good non-suspension MTB's out there?

I have a Cube Analogue, which is a couple of years old (and hardly used) but it has front suspension, which I hate and think is useless. Supposedly the lock out thing is no good for hard bumps and landings.

Cube make great looking bikes, but they all seem to be hardtails or full suspension - no fully rigid.

I could try and convert it to rigid, but I might possibly balls it up - plus there are other things wrong with it, such as: broken spokes, low brake oil in front brake - I tried to fix, only half successful i.e. not successful - and the wheel rubs off the brakes which I couldn't remedy.

So, I'm thinking maybe a new bike altogether might be best, though my budget is not high - especially considering I dropped £500 on this bike and hardly used it!

The cheaper johnny-no-name bikes look totally awful in comparison... but I would like a simpler bike - with the V caliper brakes, instead of discs (which hold no benefit and are a mighty pain to fix) and rigid forks, front and back.

What do you think?

Thanks!
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Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,600
    There are very few decent rigid (cheap) bikes. A decent rigid fork is probably under £100, and the other bits could be sorted out cheaply by a bike shop if you can't DIY. You'd end up with a much better bike.

    But unless you maintain it one way or another, any bike is going to be a heap sooner or later.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • lancewlancew Posts: 680
    A Carrera Subway will do the job, but as said above its not high spec.

    And as above I agree that the best course of action would be to get your LBS to do a swap over. Its a really easy job so shouldn't cost much. If you're having trouble keeping the bike in good nick its probably a good idea to get a good relationship with a good store anyway as it will make your life far easier in the long run.
    Specialized Allez Sport 2013
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,425
    Or if you really want simple, sell on e-bay and buy this: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/vitu ... -prod80999
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    Well, I did enquire a few places online, and they said that converting the forks is too complicated and/or ruins the bike and so they wouldn't be up for doing it...

    I done a small bit of research and heard rumblings of 'suspension-corrected' forks. Is it an easy job to do?

    If I could manage to get the pressure on the front brake fixed, I would be up for trying to convert the forks. I could probably manage it eventually, but it is a pain in the censored .

    Back when I was like 12 or something, I used to be able to fix ANYTHING on a bike, now they are all complicated to the point of over-engineered IMO... most probably just so the bike companies can fleece extra cash out of us. Disc brakes on a bicycle, really?! And I don't even believe there is a need for suspension TBH. It ruins the experience for me, totally numb ride. I used to give my old cheap censored £100 bike years of abuse 10 years ago, and it went on strong. My Cube is falling to bits after like 6 rides :shock:

    I do want a simpler bike - namely normal brakes and full rigid forks, but it seems I can't have this anymore with the better brand bikes. Cube bikes do look awesome too, shame.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,600
    The shops are talking rubbish. It's a very simple, half hour job at most, and plenty of people have done it.

    But if you've done all of that in six rides, I have nothing really to add.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,425
    Yes, its easy. I'd probably ask another shop if you don't want to do it yourself though. Keep the discs & consider forks like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bicycle-Bike-MO ... 51b7ec57ee
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    Its a half hour job to swap forks and bleed the brakes.
    Disc brakes are more reliable than rim brakes and need less maintenance. My bikes get used off road 2-3 times a week including racing and in the last year all I have had to do is swap pads which takes 2 minutes. No cables to adjust and they work in the wet and don't wear out your rims.
  • OuijaOuija Posts: 1,386
    passout wrote:
    Yes, its easy. I'd probably ask another shop if you don't want to do it yourself though. Keep the discs & consider forks like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bicycle-Bike-MO ... 51b7ec57ee

    Might want to go with suspension corrected forks with a 43cm axle to crown or more. 44/45cm is better if replacing a 100mm fork for a 26" wheel and 47cm for a 29" wheeled bike. Using anything less will drop the front of the frame and ruin the handling.
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,425
    Ouija wrote:
    passout wrote:
    Yes, its easy. I'd probably ask another shop if you don't want to do it yourself though. Keep the discs & consider forks like this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bicycle-Bike-MO ... 51b7ec57ee

    Might want to go with suspension corrected forks with a 43cm axle to crown or more. 44/45cm is better if replacing a 100mm fork for a 26" wheel and 47cm for a 29" wheeled bike. Using anything less will drop the front of the frame and ruin the handling.

    A good point. I was assuming he'd check the right length before hand. You can drop the front end a bit though when going to rigid, say 20mm, without problem in my experience. Of course rigid forks don't compress!

    I managed to get some handmade steel forks by Roberts, used off e-bay, for £50 (cost 250 new). Equiv of 80mm sus forks, replacing 100mm forks, and I think it improved handling. Depends on you & the bike. Exotic products and On
    One are worth a look too.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    OK many thanks for the input.

    First I will fix the broken spokes before I go anywhere :o

    Then I will learn properly how to bleed and fix the brakes before going onto the forks.

    How do I know what spokes I need, any ideas? I have lost all documentation for the bike, don't even know what size it is :shock:
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    Until I can make my mind up on what I want to buy I'm riding a rigid and it beats me why anyone would choose to go in this direction. The bike just spends all its time trying to kill you. Awful, just awful!
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    Until I can make my mind up on what I want to buy I'm riding a rigid and it beats me why anyone would choose to go in this direction. The bike just spends all its time trying to kill you. Awful, just awful!

    Eh? You have more control over the bike with all rigid forks...
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    rubez wrote:
    Until I can make my mind up on what I want to buy I'm riding a rigid and it beats me why anyone would choose to go in this direction. The bike just spends all its time trying to kill you. Awful, just awful!

    Eh? You have more control over the bike with all rigid forks...

    Not when it's bouncing all over the place on a rough and rocky downhill, you don't.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    I'd say so. Maybe it's more of a challenge to keep stable and not fall off, but you still have more control over the bike itself, especially in mid air.

    Hate the vague feeling of suspension, the lack of precision.
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    rubez wrote:
    I'd say so. Maybe it's more of a challenge to keep stable and not fall off, but you still have more control over the bike itself, especially in mid air.

    Hate the vague feeling of suspension, the lack of precision.

    How can you have more control when your wheels can't stay in contact with the ground? You do know that suspension isn't for comfort, don't you?
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    Do you ride off road?
  • 97th choice97th choice Posts: 2,222
    rubez wrote:
    I'd say so. Maybe it's more of a challenge to keep stable and not fall off, but you still have more control over the bike itself, especially in mid air.

    Hate the vague feeling of suspension, the lack of precision.

    Wow. What suspension bikes have you ridden exactly?
    Too-ra-loo-ra, too-ra-loo-rye, aye

    Giant Trance
    Radon ZR 27.5 Race
    Btwin Alur700
    Merida CX500
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    rubez wrote:
    I'd say so. Maybe it's more of a challenge to keep stable and not fall off, but you still have more control over the bike itself, especially in mid air.

    Hate the vague feeling of suspension, the lack of precision.

    Wow. What suspension bikes have you ridden exactly?

    Argos special probably
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    You have more control over THE BIKE... do you see the difference? :shock:

    Yes I go off-road, that's the whole point.

    Maybe suspension will allow you to go beyond your actual skill set, but I don't get myself into a situation where I am relying on an aid (a crutch) rather than skill to keep balance.

    BMX is all about control, do you think any self respecting BMX rider has suspension on their bike?! :lol:

    For fast movement in and out of rocks, suspension is a hindrance, which is why I want to get rid of it.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,600
    edited February 2014
    rubez wrote:
    You have more control over THE BIKE... do you see the difference? :shock:

    Yes I go off-road, that's the whole point.

    Maybe suspension will allow you to go beyond your actual skill set, but I don't get myself into a situation where I am relying on an aid (a crutch) rather than skill to keep balance.

    BMX is all about control, do you think any self respecting BMX rider has suspension on their bike?! :lol:

    For fast movement in and out of rocks, suspension is a hindrance, which is why I want to get rid of it.
    Er ok. I'll stick to my suspension and obviously mediocre skilllz.

    Although at least my bikes last a bit longer than six rides.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    Why then does every racer use suspension?
    Suspension keeps wheels in contact with the ground, maintaining grip and giving better control.
    I could ride through a big rock garden on a rigid bike but I could ride the same rock garden a LOT faster on my bike with 8 inches of well damped suspension.
    Riding up rocky or rooty climbs the suspension will increase traction.
    In downhill racing the speed difference between the fastest hardtail and fastest full suspension is quite a lot, a rigid will be a lot slower than a hardtail.
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    rubez wrote:
    You have more control over THE BIKE... do you see the difference? :shock:

    Yes I go off-road, that's the whole point.

    Maybe suspension will allow you to go beyond your actual skill set, but I don't get myself into a situation where I am relying on an aid (a crutch) rather than skill to keep balance.

    BMX is all about control, do you think any self respecting BMX rider has suspension on their bike?! :lol:

    For fast movement in and out of rocks, suspension is a hindrance, which is why I want to get rid of it.

    This has to be wind-up, yes?
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    Riding up rocky or rooty climbs the suspension will increase traction.

    That's where it really falls apart on a rigid. It's really hard to maintain momentum when the wheels are pogoing off rocks.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    For cars, it is not possible not to have some kind of suspension, as they'd fall apart - but the best handling cars have the stiffest suspension. the tighter it is, the better it handles. Pretty simple concept. The less give in the suspension, the more control you have over the vehicle.

    But for bikes no suspension is very possible - and gives you the most control over the bike (not the environment)

    The reason for the lock out is to stop this wasted energy, although they aren't strong enough to absorb hard bumps and knocks.

    Of course suspension bikes offer some advantages, it's just the lack of feeling kills it for me. You never feel at one with your bike.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,600
    Seriously?
    Then how come F1 cars are a bit rubbish at rallying?
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    cooldad wrote:
    Seriously?
    Then how come F1 cars are a bit rubbish at rallying?

    Ha ha, ha! There it is, in a sentence. Lol!
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    If you think rigids are faster maybe you would like to come down to Gawton, I will give you a minute head start on Egypt.
    I will even pay for your uplift.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    rubez wrote:
    For cars, it is not possible not to have some kind of suspension, as they'd fall apart - but the best handling cars have the stiffest suspension. the tighter it is, the better it handles. Pretty simple concept. The less give in the suspension, the more control you have over the vehicle.
    So rally cars run very stiff springs (they do yes, much stiffer than any normal road car despite the surfaces they are used on) but they still use suspension so the tyres can follow the surface of the planet and not spend half their time off it.....

    Are you for real?
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    You do realise what would happen to a car if it drove even on normal smooth taramc roads with zero suspension? They NEED suspension otherwise the car would be shredded in a matter of months, as in a write off.

    Anyway you are missing the point. I want better control over THE BIKE (I think I mentioned this!) I will deal with the surfaces I ride over manually.

    ... and that ability to get off the planet is key. I don't want to stay grounded. The tyres give me all the shock absorption I need.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    Go karts have no suspension, they don't fall apart F1 cars would survive with no suspension they would just be slower, tractors have no rear suspension and not much in the way of front, they don't fall apart. What suspension does is allow them to go faster and 'smoother', not stop them falling apart.

    Your just stuck thinking your right when we all know you are wrong.

    Suspension doesn't reduce your control of the bike anyway, how does it do that? You may need to exercise that control in a different way, but that's not the same thing.

    Next you'll want solid tyres so you don't lose that control robbing suspension in the tyre itself.....
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