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Fully rigid MTB

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  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    edited February 2014
    I've made my mind up?
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    chrisw333 wrote:
    Shall we lock this thread as it's clear you've made your mind up.

    No, this is fascinating.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    What about the cogs and brake disc... they don't come with wheels, do they? I didn't think the disc at least was removable, the rear wheels I'm seeing don't have them...
  • rubez wrote:
    I've made my mind up?

    yes to censored sh1tloads of money on buying a worse bike. It is moronic beyond belief.

    If you sift through the banter there is some solid advice on this thread.

    If you really want a censored bike, the bes and cheapest way to do it will be to ebay your current bike and buy a whole new one.
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    chrisw333 wrote:
    rubez wrote:
    I've made my mind up?

    yes to censored sh1tloads of money on buying a worse bike. It is moronic beyond belief.

    If you sift through the banter there is some solid advice on this thread.

    If you really want a censored bike, the bes and cheapest way to do it will be to ebay your current bike and buy a whole new one.

    Erm, I contemplating fixing this one up, however it would definitely cost a lot more money than the "sh1tloads" that simply buying new bike would, so I think you're getting a bit hyperbolic there.
  • the cheapest option, leaving you with the best bike, would be to buy carbon forks and get an lbs to fix your wheels and brakes. You have been told this several times. I cannot believe that your wheels are beyond repair after 6 rides unless you had a major crash or were riding like an idiot.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    It won't cost much to fix.
    £20 to get the brakes bled. Im guessing they are Avid brakes which are censored and unreliable. £70 would replace them with Shimano Deore brakes which are brilliant. Other than new pads mine have needed no servicing in two years and my bikes don't get an easy life.
    £30 at the absolute maximum will get your wheels straight and spokes replaced. Those Alex Rims are rubbish though. You could replace them with much lighter and stronger wheels from Superstar Components for £130.
    So that's £200 as a worst case to get it sorted. Fitting is a DIY job. Servicing gears etc is simple DIY jobs that you're going to need to learn to keep any bike in order.
  • CookehCookeh Posts: 351
    They were Stokes. And avid brakes "censored and unreliable"? toplel.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    All the Avids I have had from basic Juicy 3's up to X0 Trail's have been terrible. They need so much more attention than any other brakes I have used.
  • CookehCookeh Posts: 351
    All the Avids I have had from basic Juicy 3's up to X0 Trail's have been terrible. They need so much more attention than any other brakes I have used.

    I have Elixir 1s, one of their more budget brakes. I bled it when I bought it 2nd hand just so I knew everything was up to scratch, and Ive had absolutely zero issues in the year since. Previous owner didn't touch them either in the year he had them.

    Avids are also well reviewed, pretty much across the entire Elixir and X0 range. To make such a sweeping generalization across all Avid brakes is rather stupid.
  • 2 years on avid x9 brakes without issue. I understand older ones could be problematic but the design has changed. No way I would change mine.

    Anyway back to the point. The op has the basis of a perfectly adequate bike , he has the right to go rigid if he chooses ( I wouldn't but then I have ridden with a decent fork up front.) viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12829771.........interesting thread on a cube rigid conversion.
    learn basic maintenance to reduce outlay , , it's what I have done . Only been in a workshop to fit a new bottom bracket and that was £ 20.00 .

    It is hard to tell but given the benefit of the doubt the op could be genuine, if so then there's good advice posted as well as some pointless points scoring going on.

    Back in the day I managed to kill a set of cheap elastomer suspension forks ( snapped at break boss ) couldn't afford to replace so went rigid ( 1970's gt arrowhead ) the bike was still more than rideable and had v brakes .
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    he has the right to go rigid if he chooses... ... if so then there's good advice posted as well as some pointless points scoring
    rubez wrote:
    I just need a simple, robust bike. What's wrong with that?

    Nothing. It's your nutty and ill-informed reasoning that's in question.
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    I reckon I could fix the bike for about £40-50 at most (probably about £25), with Rigid forks as well I could probably fix it for sub £75.

    Where are you Rubez? I'd hate to see you make the worst decision of your life (assumption!) for the sake of some easy to supply help!

    I bleed brakes, I replace spokes, I swap forks (I have also built all 8 bikes in the family) ... all with a £20 Lidl toolkit and an Avid bleed kit and an old syringe (for the Shimano).
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    Decided to fix it up, though I will be getting new wheels and doing it all myself.

    I will need to make a new thread for help :lol:

    To begin with I am just gonna use rollers to get back up to speed again, so I just need to replace the wheels first of all, think I will get new rotors too just in case - though they, the forks and brakes can come at a later stage when I am ready to take it out on the road. i.e. next pay cheque :|

    Wheels are £70 minimum each.
  • OuijaOuija Posts: 1,386
    Which wheels?
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    The last ones were double wall, not sure what that is, or if it is significant?

    Just looking for a cheap set, something like this?

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/mavic-crossride-ub-mtb-front-wheel-2014/rp-prod111103

    I would happily go heavier if it meant stronger...
  • OuijaOuija Posts: 1,386
    rubez wrote:
    The last ones were double wall, not sure what that is, or if it is significant?

    Just looking for a cheap set, something like this?

    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/mavic-crossride-ub-mtb-front-wheel-2014/rp-prod111103

    I would happily go heavier if it meant stronger...

    £67 for a front wheel? Not exactly budget and probably not the strongest with so few spokes. If weight isn't an issue you can pick up full sets for as little as £50 with more spokes (32/36). The best prices are always going to be on Ebay or from German sites such as Rose/Bike24 etc.

    If you want new you could go for this set at £89 or these at £83 (if you don't mind silver spokes).

    For forks, you could go for cheaper aluminium ones like these (which are probably the minimum height needed to replace a 100mm suspension fork) or something more along the lines of the chunkier Exotic forks (or a slightly longer version to replace 120mm forks).

    Hell, you can even pick old mechanical disk brakes for £50 (or less) if you don't want to faff about with hydraulics.
  • CqcCqc Posts: 951
    rubez wrote:
    Decided to fix it up, though I will be getting new wheels and doing it all myself.

    I will need to make a new thread for help :lol:

    To begin with I am just gonna use rollers to get back up to speed again, so I just need to replace the wheels first of all, think I will get new rotors too just in case - though they, the forks and brakes can come at a later stage when I am ready to take it out on the road. i.e. next pay cheque :|

    Wheels are £70 minimum each.
    Good SOME sense has been hammered into that thick skull of yours...
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    Cookeh wrote:
    All the Avids I have had from basic Juicy 3's up to X0 Trail's have been terrible. They need so much more attention than any other brakes I have used.

    I have Elixir 1s, one of their more budget brakes. I bled it when I bought it 2nd hand just so I knew everything was up to scratch, and Ive had absolutely zero issues in the year since. Previous owner didn't touch them either in the year he had them.

    Avids are also well reviewed, pretty much across the entire Elixir and X0 range. To make such a sweeping generalization across all Avid brakes is rather stupid.

    It was a statement based on experience of owning Juicy 3 & 7, Elixir 1, 3 & 5 Codes and X0 Trail. All were hopeless compared to the Shimamo and Hope brakes I have also had.
  • passoutpassout Posts: 4,425
    I've always had more issues with Shimano than Avids. Magura were the most reliable. Never tried Hope.
    'Happiness serves hardly any other purpose than to make unhappiness possible' Marcel Proust.
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    Right! So, I have all my other parts sorted out... now I need some front rigid forks :D

    What am I looking for? Will any forks do, or do they have to be specified "suspension corrected"? Rigid forks are in pretty sparse supply as it is compared to suspension ones...

    What tools are needed?

    When the forks are fitted, should I be looking for my bike to stand the same height as it does now? (if I measured from the ground up to the handlebars) and that would be with or without weight (me) on the bike?

    Thanks.
  • chrisw333chrisw333 Posts: 695
    Something like these will be ideal.

    Length wise, others will be able to advise better than me, but yes prob best to get suspension corrected ones to keep the same geometry. The axle to crown measurement is the key. The are post mount for the brakes, which will be best for your new brakes too.

    http://www.carboncycles.cc/?s=0&t=2&c=43&p=1036&
  • OuijaOuija Posts: 1,386
    If your suspension forks are 100mm travel then you need rigid forks that are 445mm axle to crown. This will drop the handle bar height a little. A better option is to go with 460mm IMO.

    You'll need to cut the steerer down to size with a junior hacksaw, pull the crown race off your old forks and fit it on the new one (can be tricky to get off but a flat headed screwdriver or knife edge can be used to wiggle it free). If you've got a aluminium or carbon fibre steerer tube then it's probably a good idea to fit a expander bung in the top of it to allow you to preload the headset, rather than trying to fit the traditional star fangled nut. This is because these two materials tend to be thicker than a steel tube so that inside diameter of the tube is narrower, making it hard to press a star fangled nut down there. They are also softer material so a star fangled nut would gauge out material from the sides of the tube whereas a expander bung won't. They can be picked up for less than a tenner.
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    Pretty sure they are 100mm travel, but hacksaw? Is that necessary?
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    rubez wrote:
    Pretty sure they are 100mm travel, but hacksaw? Is that necessary?

    Your teeth probably aren't up to the job.

    More seriously, yes it is necessary in nearly all cases - an uncut steerer is usually 265mm or thereabouts, and if you don't cut it you can end up with an odd extension on the top of your stem when you've got the handlebars at the height you want them. It's worth putting up with the odd extension for a couple of rides until you're sure of the height you want the bars, but then cut it down so you have no more than 20mm of spacers on top.
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    What is a steerer anyway? :lol: Are there any guides for this? I can't find any...

    What about something like this? Says it's corrected for 100mm suspension.

    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/26-thorn-mt-tura-mk2-steel-fork-80-100-mm-suspension-corrected-matt-black-prod30197/

    The 28.6 mm dia Mt.-Tura steerer tubes are a whooping 400 mm long!
    The forks have an Axle to crown length (L1) of 430 mm.

    (This compensates perfectly for either 80 mm or 100 mm travel forks, either of which actually rides at around 430 mm in neutral conditions).
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    rubez wrote:
    What is a steerer anyway? :lol: Are there any guides for this? I can't find any...

    Seriously, read Parktools.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • chrisw333chrisw333 Posts: 695
    Personally I wouldn't cut the steerer yourself or even fit the forks until you are far more confident / knowledgeable of the process. It really wont cost much for a shop to do it and getting it wrong is a very costly mistake.
  • Angus YoungAngus Young Posts: 3,063
    chrisw333 wrote:
    Personally I wouldn't cut the steerer yourself or even fit the forks until you are far more confident / knowledgeable of the process. It really wont cost much for a shop to do it and getting it wrong is a very costly mistake.

    What? Pay an LBS to do work? Pah!
    All the gear, no idea and loving the smell of jealousy in the morning.
    Kona Process 134 viewtopic.php?f=10017&t=12994607
  • rubezrubez Posts: 323
    What if I get new handlebars? and get the perfect combination of lengths to match up with a fork?

    Is the pole the handlebars are on called the steerer? It doesn't look to be included with handlebars (for sale) are they seperate?

    My current handlebars look censored , and wouldn't be averse to changing them out, since there are some great looking ones for cheap.
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