Ride London 2014

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  • DHA987SDHA987S Posts: 284
    HertsG wrote:
    But wasn't wearing helmet number so that might be why they aren't coming up.
    I think that it did say on the back of the helmet sticker that its sole purpose was to ID the photographs.

    Yeah I saw that, but mine wouldn't attach to my helmet that easy so binned it.
  • Dippydog2Dippydog2 Posts: 291
    I am not going to bother with a jersey number next time. The safety pins have made holes in my jersey and if was covered up all the time anyway.

    Safety information is inside my helmet permanently, where it should be.

    All this "if you do or do not do this you will not be allowed to ride" was bollards. Tri bars, no bike sticker, no one checking numbers etc.......
  • Ref the comments on not having helmet numbers - I was not in this year's event but cycled up Newlands just before 2pm. There were loads of helmet stickers all over the road, far more than discarded gels! Maybe they were washed off by the rain?
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,413
    I'm a bit annoyed about my photo selection really - they've only found two of me, despite me affixing the helmet number and stopping to pose for the finish line photographer (no sign of that one...). Given the twenty thousand other riders the search facility is very much needle in a haystack time.

    There is at least some video but that's pretty rubbish too due to big rain blobs - fairly understandable but obviously not worth shelling much money out for.
  • Omar LittleOmar Little Posts: 2,040
    I didnt put my helmet sticker on (i didnt want the sticky residue left on the helmet afterwards) but have 40 photos presumably all the number on the bars rather than my back. Perhaps something to do with the wave / background colour meaning some numbers were easier to read than others by software?
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    I'm puzzled by the need for a number to be pinned to you, especially as it has left some nice holes in a jersey I was wearing for the first time that day. It can't be for the photographers as every sportive I've ridden that had photographers on it picked me up on the basis of the handlebar number alone. I think it was so that people could feel like they were in a race and wearing a race number, just like the pros do.

    The helmet sticker was huge and just looked daft so I didnt bother with it. Still got 17 pictures of me from the ride though.
  • HertsGHertsG Posts: 129
    10614402_283392981866977_3267330385454901832_n.jpg?oh=2c13481f259a2c550a67a64309ee30b9&oe=5470DF35&__gda__=1415520363_fa98c5fb16cd6866236d545638d07d2e

    I carefully trimmed my helmet sticker and fitted it in the dryness of my home. Same with the bike-frame stickers, but that fell off one of our bikes somewhere on the ride. I don't think that these stickers do very well when wet!
  • sherersherer Posts: 2,329
    I was worried about the pins through my jersey but my jersey seemed to do ok with the holes, they closed up ones the pins were out.

    I think last year I got a few more pics when I checked the site a few days later. Shame I didn't pose a bit more for some of the pictures.
  • Rich_ERich_E Posts: 395
    rodgers73 wrote:
    I'm puzzled by the need for a number to be pinned to you, especially as it has left some nice holes in a jersey I was wearing for the first time that day. It can't be for the photographers as every sportive I've ridden that had photographers on it picked me up on the basis of the handlebar number alone. I think it was so that people could feel like they were in a race and wearing a race number, just like the pros do.

    The jersey number is the primary method of identifying that you are part of the event and as to who you are. There could be any number of reasons why in an emergency or otherwise where you could be separated from your bike, and thus the numbers that are mounted to it.

    It's basic common sense really, especially for such a huge event.

    If you are worried about pinning to your jersey, there are some guides out there on the best way to pin and how to minimise any damage to the jersey itself. Plus if you are really worried, you could trying using scotch tape, or some form of temporary adhesive method.
  • Dippydog2Dippydog2 Posts: 291
    I didnt put my helmet sticker on (i didnt want the sticky residue left on the helmet afterwards) but have 40 photos presumably all the number on the bars rather than my back. Perhaps something to do with the wave / background colour meaning some numbers were easier to read than others by software?
    Easy solution. Put a few strips of sticky tape on your helmet. Stick the label onto that. When you are finished the sticky tape peels off bringing the label with it.

    The bike frame labels were pants though. Mine fell off in the wet.
  • birdie23birdie23 Posts: 457
    My jerseys are slightly damaged from event numbers, depends on how your jersey is made how bad it can be. Still, I'd rather I had that sheet with all my info on in case I go down badly somewhere during an event.
    2012 Cube Agree GTC
  • Rich_E wrote:
    rodgers73 wrote:
    I'm puzzled by the need for a number to be pinned to you, especially as it has left some nice holes in a jersey I was wearing for the first time that day. It can't be for the photographers as every sportive I've ridden that had photographers on it picked me up on the basis of the handlebar number alone. I think it was so that people could feel like they were in a race and wearing a race number, just like the pros do.

    The jersey number is the primary method of identifying that you are part of the event and as to who you are. There could be any number of reasons why in an emergency or otherwise where you could be separated from your bike, and thus the numbers that are mounted to it.

    It's basic common sense really, especially for such a huge event.

    If you are worried about pinning to your jersey, there are some guides out there on the best way to pin and how to minimise any damage to the jersey itself. Plus if you are really worried, you could trying using scotch tape, or some form of temporary adhesive method.

    aerosol spray mount is what was used to use back in the day when i was worried about the drag effect of a number and pin parachute. it works great in dry weather, but not sure how well it would work in last sunday's conditions.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,800
    Dippydog2 wrote:
    The bike frame labels were pants though. Mine fell off in the wet.

    I find them the opposite. They are semi cloth and tough to get off (not got around to taking mine off this year yet) and leave an annoying residue which I had to use acetone (pure) to get off.
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Soak the frame label in water (they were sliding off in the wet on the ride for sure!). Just wrap a wet tea towel around the frame and let it soak a while. Both of mine came off easily enough and no harsh chemicals needed.
  • birdie23birdie23 Posts: 457
    marcusjb wrote:
    Soak the frame label in water (they were sliding off in the wet on the ride for sure!). Just wrap a wet tea towel around the frame and let it soak a while. Both of mine came off easily enough and no harsh chemicals needed.

    I just peeled mine off and then rubbed the residue away with a wet rag.
    2012 Cube Agree GTC
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    Rich_E wrote:
    rodgers73 wrote:
    I'm puzzled by the need for a number to be pinned to you, especially as it has left some nice holes in a jersey I was wearing for the first time that day. It can't be for the photographers as every sportive I've ridden that had photographers on it picked me up on the basis of the handlebar number alone. I think it was so that people could feel like they were in a race and wearing a race number, just like the pros do.

    The jersey number is the primary method of identifying that you are part of the event and as to who you are. There could be any number of reasons why in an emergency or otherwise where you could be separated from your bike, and thus the numbers that are mounted to it.

    It's basic common sense really, especially for such a huge event.

    If you are worried about pinning to your jersey, there are some guides out there on the best way to pin and how to minimise any damage to the jersey itself. Plus if you are really worried, you could trying using scotch tape, or some form of temporary adhesive method.


    Then why was this event the first one that has required a number to be pinned to my body and not just rely on a number on the bike? I've done dozens of sportives and all they've ever needed was a number on the bars. Just seems like annoying overkill.
  • rodgers73 wrote:
    Then why was this event the first one that has required a number to be pinned to my body and not just rely on a number on the bike?

    It wasn't.
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,028
    i think its pretty bog standard in all the sportives ive ridden, body number bar number and transponder thingy. only difference was the bike sticker but i can see that makes sense
  • My pennorthworth on the racing / not-racing / pacelines debate:

    I was possibly one of the few to slightly overestimate my finish time - the vast majority it seemed put themselves down for a much faster time than they were likely to achieve. Because I spent the whole four hours of my ride overtaking hundreds, probably thousands of slower riders - both on my own and later as part of a group of 5-6 that got more coherent and faster as the ride went on, creating a great deal of satisfaction and enjoyment for all concerned.

    I was / we were passed by a handful of v speedy chaingangs who all seemed capable and if not cautious then certainly not taking outrageous risks. If I had been in a start wave with my clubmates I'd have been doing the same thing.

    Where necessary we gave a shout that we were coming through on the right, and I am sure some of those we passed were annoyed by it, but that is unreasonable on their part.

    I think the problem is that people who are not used to riding at speed in groups and in close proximity to others have a different perception of what is risky riding and what is in control. I would like to know how many of those complaining about pacelines coming past were stuck out on the right hand side of the road when they should have been over to the left, or not holding their line properly.

    No matter that it is not a race, you should always be expecting people to be coming past on the right, and needless to say should avoid sudden movements (of which there many to be seen).

    So I think the answer is, either get used to riding at speed in a group and in tight spaces, or don't put down a finish time that is an hour faster than what you are capable of.
  • Rich_ERich_E Posts: 395
    rodgers73 wrote:
    Then why was this event the first one that has required a number to be pinned to my body and not just rely on a number on the bike? I've done dozens of sportives and all they've ever needed was a number on the bars. Just seems like annoying overkill.

    As Mikey says, it's not. I've ridden in plenty of events that give you a number to wear.
    Like I said before though, this is a massive sportive. You've got thousands of riders on the road, accidents happen, you only need to look at the tragedy that happened at this very ride last weekend. Having a number on your body which also has your details on the back of it could be of paramount importance in such a situation, or to notify loved ones etc.

    I don't really see why its worth complaining or arguing about. Plus in good weather, it potentially makes it look like you are somebody poaching the ride if you aren't wearing official numbers.
  • boris54boris54 Posts: 11
    My pennorthworth on the racing / not-racing / pacelines debate:

    I was possibly one of the few to slightly overestimate my finish time - the vast majority it seemed put themselves down for a much faster time than they were likely to achieve. Because I spent the whole four hours of my ride overtaking hundreds, probably thousands of slower riders - both on my own and later as part of a group of 5-6 that got more coherent and faster as the ride went on, creating a great deal of satisfaction and enjoyment for all concerned.

    I was / we were passed by a handful of v speedy chaingangs who all seemed capable and if not cautious then certainly not taking outrageous risks. If I had been in a start wave with my clubmates I'd have been doing the same thing.

    Where necessary we gave a shout that we were coming through on the right, and I am sure some of those we passed were annoyed by it, but that is unreasonable on their part.

    I think the problem is that people who are not used to riding at speed in groups and in close proximity to others have a different perception of what is risky riding and what is in control. I would like to know how many of those complaining about pacelines coming past were stuck out on the right hand side of the road when they should have been over to the left, or not holding their line properly.

    No matter that it is not a race, you should always be expecting people to be coming past on the right, and needless to say should avoid sudden movements (of which there many to be seen).

    So I think the answer is, either get used to riding at speed in a group and in tight spaces, or don't put down a finish time that is an hour faster than what you are capable of.

    Sir Long Tights is quite right (though I'm a MAMIL, not a club rider) - there were many sat in positions on the road which were just antisocial. I'm guessing many of these won't be on this forum. Don't care whether its described as 'rules', 'etiquette' or 'common sense' - but it needs sorting in the comms riders receive in advance
  • sherersherer Posts: 2,329
    The trouble is the same people do this on l2b as well. Just like on the motorway too many people drive in the middle lane for miles on end.

    All the emails tell you how to ride but too many people just ignore them
  • JSCLJSCL Posts: 1,259
    Enjoyed the experience, sort of, in a strange way. Was great to ride the roads down there, didn't see many etiquette issues. A group of us via employer had been given some free places about two weeks before the event and I wasn't really too sure what to expect. But the group of us and, as you do, started taking turns on the front with lots of people joining the line behind us (but not all prepared to take a turn). But at roundabouts, it became clear who had ridden in a group before and who hadn't and one of them, a small group of us were brought down at a bit of speed. But hey, these things happen, so long as we get back up and keep riding :)

    However, downsides and all, went in to hospital on Weds with what turns out to be salmonella. Doctors agree that it's likely to have resulted from spray from the roads (sewage water and there was some horse muck out there too). Fresh out today. But has left a negative feeler for me.

    I'm struggling to explain to people how WET it was. People normally just say "Oh it's only a bit of rain."

    zonaviy8
    Follow me on Twitter - http://twitter.com/scalesjason - All posts are strictly my personal view.
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,929
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,028
    Done mine...
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Too early to start a thread on what the weather is going to be and what to wear?
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,028
    The long range weather forecast is better...
  • rodgers73rodgers73 Posts: 2,626
    Rich_E wrote:
    rodgers73 wrote:
    Then why was this event the first one that has required a number to be pinned to my body and not just rely on a number on the bike? I've done dozens of sportives and all they've ever needed was a number on the bars. Just seems like annoying overkill.

    As Mikey says, it's not. I've ridden in plenty of events that give you a number to wear.
    Like I said before though, this is a massive sportive. You've got thousands of riders on the road, accidents happen, you only need to look at the tragedy that happened at this very ride last weekend. Having a number on your body which also has your details on the back of it could be of paramount importance in such a situation, or to notify loved ones etc.

    I don't really see why its worth complaining or arguing about. Plus in good weather, it potentially makes it look like you are somebody poaching the ride if you aren't wearing official numbers.


    No, I meant it was my first encounter with body numbers, not the first time they've ever been required. Anyway...
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