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World Championship - ***SPOILERS***

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  • thegibdogthegibdog Posts: 2,106
    Graeme_S wrote:
    Mechanism wrote:
    The 2nd one is the French jersey although I don't know what animal that is on the sleeve
    Some sort of Gallic rooster?
    The athletic rooster - le coq sportif, surely?
  • frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
    thegibdog wrote:
    Graeme_S wrote:
    Mechanism wrote:
    The 2nd one is the French jersey although I don't know what animal that is on the sleeve
    Some sort of Gallic rooster?
    The athletic rooster - le coq sportif, surely?

    10004874125_4a49cf4690_b.jpg
    Contador is the Greatest
  • hommelbierhommelbier Posts: 1,514
    Paul 8v wrote:
    Anyone know who these two are?
    9967431186_fbe76339e7_b.jpg
    9967453266_e90a6cac0e_b.jpg
    Can't tell what kit it is, do you have it in colour?

    Bottom photo is probably Audrey Cordon

    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audrey_Cordon
  • Mechanism wrote:
    Graeme_S wrote:
    Mechanism wrote:
    The 2nd one is the French jersey although I don't know what animal that is on the sleeve
    Some sort of Gallic rooster?

    Maybe, or could be a marmotte.
    It's a coq.
  • TimB34TimB34 Posts: 316
    What he said - it's a stylised Gallic Rooster (coq), but not the symbol of Le Coq Sportif.

    French team kit is made by Giordana : http://ffc.fanavenue.com/go/ffc2013th01l.htm
  • eheh Posts: 4,854
    Geraint's blog on BBC now:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/24395592

    Doesn't exactly big up Wiggo descending skills does it?!
  • Daz555Daz555 Posts: 4,040
    eh wrote:
    Doesn't exactly big up Wiggo descending skills does it?!
    There is nothing to big up. He used to be handy enough - he was certainly good enough that no-one noticed his descending skills in the wet or dry. Since the Giro (or in the run up perhaps in training) something went wrong and he's lost his mojo. It happens.

    Wiggo should be pleased it happened when it did - he's about to go back to the track so he need not worry about it too much for the remainder of his road career. :mrgreen:
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • dsoutardsoutar Posts: 1,746
    Daz555 wrote:
    Wiggo should be pleased it happened when it did - he's about to go back to the track so he need not worry about it too much for the remainder of his road career. :mrgreen:

    Oh I don't know - coming high off those bends on the banked track... :wink:
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 22,992
    dsoutar wrote:
    Daz555 wrote:
    Wiggo should be pleased it happened when it did - he's about to go back to the track so he need not worry about it too much for the remainder of his road career. :mrgreen:

    Oh I don't know - coming high off those bends on the banked track... :wink:
    It's not going to rain though.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • dish_dashdish_dash Posts: 4,744
    Mr Thomas' column is interesting: http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/cycling/24395592

    "I did speak to Sir Bradley Wiggins after the descent down San Baronto (after 58km of the 272km race) because he went from the front to pretty much the back of the bunch. Mentally he has got a bit of an issue about riding in the rain after crashing in this year's Giro d'Italia. So I told him that, if he wanted to, he could do his work early on. Riding on the front of a race is easier than trying to fight in the wheels of a big bunch of riders when you have to deal with wet roads and tight corners. He was about to do that, but then we hit some corners and nobody saw him again. I am still not sure what happened to him, because I did not see him afterwards."

    "We actually had a good chat amongst ourselves about what went wrong when it was just us riders on the bus back to the hotel, and then Rod went through the race with us afterwards."

    "We thought Froomey was in better shape than it turned out he was and, when we had our team meeting the night before and talked tactics, he wanted a hard race."
  • Froome has clearly learnt from last weekend's experience:
    http://www.cyclingnews.com/news/chris-f ... -lombardia
    Rain rust? :P
    "Science is a tool for cheaters". An anonymous French PE teacher.
  • frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
    Confirming the fact that he is a total lightweight and good at telling porkies.

    Oh well he was only going to pull out halfway anyway and it means the spoiler thread will have less UK and Sky nutters 'contributing'.
    Contador is the Greatest
  • mike6mike6 Posts: 1,199
    Confirming the fact that he is a total lightweight and good at telling porkies.

    Oh well he was only going to pull out halfway anyway and it means the spoiler thread will have less UK and Sky nutters 'contributing'.

    So, a TDF winner is a lightweight? You are such a w****r. If you had any idea about pro cycling you would be dangerous. :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
  • adr82adr82 Posts: 4,002
    Confirming the fact that he is a total lightweight and good at telling porkies.

    Oh well he was only going to pull out halfway anyway and it means the spoiler thread will have less UK and Sky nutters 'contributing'.
    speaking of "nutters"...
  • MacaloonMacaloon Posts: 5,545
    Oh well he was only going to pull out halfway anyway and it means the spoiler thread will have less UK and Sky nutters 'contributing'.

    A great big 'frenchie's room' welcome to any browsers that may have something interesting (the funnier the better) to say?
    ...a rare 100% loyal Pro Race poster. A poster boy for the community.
  • RichN95.RichN95. Posts: 22,992
    Leave Frenchie alone.

    The sport of cycling was built on overblown reports of rides with tales of suffering and heavyweight performances. Vague qualities like panche, elan and suplesse were held at a premium.

    Modern sport science has exposed that as BS, but there is something romantic, if somewhat naive, in clinging to those luddite times. Frenchie is our representive of those times.

    I disagree with him on most things, but I admire his devotion to cycling's old school PR.
    Twitter: @RichN95
  • ocdupalaisocdupalais Posts: 3,646
    RichN95 wrote:
    Leave Frenchie alone.

    The sport of cycling was built on overblown reports of rides with tales of suffering and heavyweight performances. Vague qualities like panche, elan and suplesse were held at a premium.

    Modern sport science has exposed that as BS, but there is something romantic, if somewhat naive, in clinging to those luddite times. Frenchie is our representive of those times.

    I disagree with him on most things, but I admire his devotion to cycling's old school PR.

    Give over Rich.
    His devotion is to his ego.

    I admire your ability to have a good dig yet still somehow manage to not make it personal...
  • MacaloonMacaloon Posts: 5,545
    Rich has a point. Poor guy gets a UTI every time he gets in the saddle.
    ...a rare 100% loyal Pro Race poster. A poster boy for the community.
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 9,484
    RichN95 wrote:
    Leave Frenchie alone.

    The sport of cycling was built on overblown reports of rides with tales of suffering and heavyweight performances. Vague qualities like panche, elan and suplesse were held at a premium.

    Modern sport science has exposed that as BS, but there is something romantic, if somewhat naive, in clinging to those luddite times. Frenchie is our representive of those times.

    I disagree with him on most things, but I admire his devotion to cycling's old school PR.

    There's nowt wrong with the old school values. They might not win races, but that's built into the very concept of panache. But being rather hazy they are very much "in the eye of the beholder" and subject to extreme subjectivity. Occasionally this seems to manifest itself as a piece of grit, causing teary blurred vision that prevents one seeing what really happened in a race.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • Paul 8vPaul 8v Posts: 5,458
    Without the riders with panache the tours (One day races less so due to their nature) would end up like F1 did a few years ago where it was like a procession. I think that is what Frenchie objects to ;-)
  • frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
    Yeah. If this sport was based in numbers and science it would be as successful as track racing. The very 'romanticism' and 'suffering' is what made a lot of you first watch the sport and what puts people on the side of the road. That doesn't apply to the factory fans but thankfully they are in the minority in the global scope of this sport - this forum isn't a true reflection of the demography of road cycling fans.
    Contador is the Greatest
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 9,484
    Yeah. If this sport was based in numbers and science it would be as successful as track racing. The very 'romanticism' and 'suffering' is what made a lot of you first watch the sport and what puts people on the side of the road. That doesn't apply to the factory fans but thankfully they are in the minority in the global scope of this sport - this forum isn't a true reflection of the demography of road cycling fans.

    You appear to have some grit in your eye.
    There's nowt wrong with the old school values. They might not win races, but that's built into the very concept of panache. But being rather hazy they are very much "in the eye of the beholder" and subject to extreme subjectivity. Occasionally this seems to manifest itself as a piece of grit, causing teary blurred vision that prevents one seeing what really happened in a race.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • frenchfighterfrenchfighter Posts: 30,642
    No I do not. If you can provide a convincing argument to counter my points lets hear it.
    Contador is the Greatest
  • No_Ta_DoctorNo_Ta_Doctor Posts: 9,484
    No I do not. If you can provide a convincing argument to counter my points lets hear it.

    We've all heard it a thousand times already, FF. I've no problem with your romanticised vision of cycling, I just wish you'd apply your values objectively, across the board, instead of using them to knock riders and teams you don't like - especially Sky.
    “Road racing was over and the UCI had banned my riding positions on the track, so it was like ‘Jings, crivvens, help ma Boab, what do I do now? I know, I’ll go away and be depressed for 10 years’.”

    @DrHeadgear

    The Vikings are coming!
  • MacaloonMacaloon Posts: 5,545
    I'd suggest taking a look at one's OFF-Score: the ratio of bilious posts dripping molten scathe on riders, teams, fans, even nations (God help our cotton socks), to those containing top images, jokes, or interesting background info on riders and teams.

    If it's high you may have mistaken this for the Sky bashing, Froome hating, BC smearing, noob undermining, Brit baiting Radar Forum.
    ...a rare 100% loyal Pro Race poster. A poster boy for the community.
  • mike6mike6 Posts: 1,199
    For a start, define Old School" Now, there is no such thing. Old school training died out when Fausto Coppi started training with intervals and repetitions. The days of riders simply riding X number of K then doing the first race of the season are long, long gone. Or why has so called "Heavyweight, Old School" Contador got a big power and heart rate monitor on his bike? Frenchie seems to think any rider that can climb is "Old School", not so, they are just blessed with natural ability to climb, and if they are on a good day they attack, in there natural element, and it sticks. Or.. someone like Wiggins ruins his day by maintaining his pace and out climbing the climber. A shame but the fastest rider wins. That's racing.

    "Heavyweight", there is another much loved Frenchie word. A rider can only termed a heavyweight if he or she has the palmares. Without the race victories you are not a heavyweight.

    "Suffering" Every rider who wins a race, and especially a GT, knows how to suffer, the suffering has never gone out of our sport. If you win a race you are a "worthy" winner, regardless. All this pontificating about factory boys and science in sport is rubbish. Wake up, scientific training has been used for decades.

    Also do not try and tell people on this forum they are not real cycling fans. I appreciate and support most pro cyclists and hail any race winner, unlike you who throws his toys out of the pram if his chosen boy is beaten by a better rider. Please keep posting the photos but keep the childish, puerile, blinkered ranting to yourself.
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