Oi roadies, tell me why....

RandG
RandG Posts: 779
edited June 2013 in Road general
As a fairly recent convert to the road I've always wondered why roadies don't wear a backpack, like pretty much all the mtb'ers do but tonight while out I seen a bloke in full kit with a backpack, and did make me wonder, why very few where them.

So why not ?
«13

Comments

  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    1. Against the rules
    2. Unnecessary
    3. Ever done 12 hours in a proper position with a backpack?
    4. See number 1
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • iPete
    iPete Posts: 6,076
    Sweaty, uncomfy, extra strain, extra drag, no need..
  • 16mm
    16mm Posts: 545
    No need. We carry water on the frame, and tools under the saddle usually.
    With a flatter back on a road bike, back ache is much more of a possibility with a backpack.

    Also panniers are available, which again move the load to the bike.

    A few beginner roadies use backpacks and they carry much more than they need. I'm current trying to get my brother to stop riding with one...
  • arthur_scrimshaw
    arthur_scrimshaw Posts: 2,596
    Because we're fitter and ride further and harder than mtb'ers, a backpack would be uncomfortable, sweaty and make us less aero.
    Do you ever see Cav or Wiggo wearing one?
  • Grill
    Grill Posts: 5,610
    Because we're fitter and ride further and harder than mtb'ers, a backpack would be uncomfortable, sweaty and make us less aero.
    Do you ever see Cav or Wiggo wearing one?

    During the ToB last year I was half expecting Eisel to be wearing one so Cav could jump in at the foot of Caerphilly Mountain. :mrgreen:
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • simon_masterson
    simon_masterson Posts: 2,740
    See above posts. They are annoying. I've begrudgingly started using a (very small) one for work as my rack bolt fatigued and half of it is still in the eye, and it's not practical for me to leave absolutely everything there, though I'm working on that. It's manageable for that, but nothing else. I would not want to wear one for long distances.

    I understand the reasons why some MTBers choose to use one (eg. to act as a cushion in the event of a fall, rather than having sharp objects in back pockets), but for road cycling it's not practical or necessary. Big rucksacks are absolutely out of the question; for safety reasons apart from anything else.
  • xscreamsuk
    xscreamsuk Posts: 318
    turning it around, what do MTB peeps have in their back packs? I see photos of club MTB section like they are ready to conquer Everest. Nothing I can't fit in Jersey pockets for a 4 or 5 hour road ride.
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    Yeah true, what do you carry in those packs?

    I commute with mine but even then its a tiny 10lt one but on a ride theres just no need. Its extra bulk for no reason and its just not cool as a roadie!
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
    Specialized Hardrock MTB for Lumps
    Specialized Langster SS for Ease
    Cinelli Mash Bolt Fixed for Pain
    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    i commute with a backpack and thats when I do most of my miles so I'd say i have a backpack 90% of the time!
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Barteos
    Barteos Posts: 657
    edited May 2013
    I wear a 10-15lb bulky backpack on a 1h long (one way) commute and I hardly notice it.
    Even when I extend the return leg to 1.5-2.00h it's not the end of the world.
    It doesn't have a big effect on average speed either.
    It's obviously nicer to ride without one but let's not make a big drama about a pound or two on your back.

    RandG:
    Remember that most of trends in road cycling are dictated by form, not function.
    Ride and wear what works for you.

    P.S. I've tried panniers but they just don't handle as well.
  • doug5_10
    doug5_10 Posts: 465
    I think it stems from MTBers using Camelbaks instead of bidons, hence can't really have anything in jersey pockets, hence it becomes a backpack. I presume the whole moving-the-saddle-up-and-down-thing (i'm a seasoned MTBer, can you tell :wink:) prevents the use of saddle packs, hence that will go in a backpack as well. And if you're off into the wildy-wild, you need a bit more kit. Since roadies have none of these issues (unless you're Tommy V in the Tour of Belgium!!) ergo: no Backpacks.

    And its against the rules

    And you look like a Bumbly (same effect as reflectors, bells, mirrors, baggy lycra etc....)
    Edinburgh Revolution Curve
    http://app.strava.com/athletes/1920048
  • TomOdell
    TomOdell Posts: 33
    i wear mine on my 8 mile ride to college. it's got a full ring binder folder and 3 a4 books. that's a pain in the arse enough
  • Mikey41
    Mikey41 Posts: 690
    RandG wrote:
    As a fairly recent convert to the road I've always wondered why roadies don't wear a backpack, like pretty much all the mtb'ers do but tonight while out I seen a bloke in full kit with a backpack, and did make me wonder, why very few where them.

    So why not ?
    It's already been said, but with the more leaned-forward road positioning, any extra weight on your back is very uncomfortable.

    I use a small backpack for commuting, my lunch goes in it basically, but that's only 20 mins each way. I can put up with it for carrying stuff 5 miles or so if I need to, but I would never use a pack for a ride of any decent length.

    I can understand MTBers using packs as their riding position is much more upright. Hydration packs I can especially understand as many MTB's seem to only fit one bottle cage, and they would struggle to fit a large bottle in there.
    Giant Defy 2 (2012)
    Giant Defy Advanced 2 (2013)
    Giant Revel 1 Ltd (2013)
    Strava
  • lastwords
    lastwords Posts: 304
    Your missing the point with the backpacks for MTB'ers we used them because when riding the trails offroad you want less weight on your bike to improve its maneuverability also when the going gets rough bottles tend to bounce out of there cages. I carry very little in my pack pump, tube, puncture repair kit, plasters, phone. If im going off the beaten track I may carry a few more tools just in case.
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,391
    As an MTB convert to the dark side and can say with full assurance that Arthurs first sentence is arsewater of the highest order...

    Anyway, on the road you need much less stuff as you re not out in the wild ever (If you can call your granny to come pick you up then it's not wild). All you really need is a spare tube, a small multi tool and a pump. A roadie rain jacket can fit in a jersey pocket, the bottles can go on the frame and a snack in the other pocket.

    The biggest advantage of a Camelbak is that the hose doesnt get powerhosed with mud like bottles do. Secondly when you re out in the wild proper a mechanical can cause serious problems. An hours ride back to a road could mean a 3-4hr walk which could get scary pretty quickly. Hence MTBers need to carry more stuff in case of problems (spare clothes, tools etc). At trail centres or XC races, this is much less important. Even simpler than that, I can stop at a cafe and fill my bidons up on the road - not so if I'm on a 6hr ride on the MTB

    Thirdly, the lower longer position on a roadie makes a backpack uncomfortable much quicker than the more upright position on a Mountain Bike. A simple example is that a backpack keeps hitting the back of my helmet on the roadie, whereas even when the MTB is in full race mode there's not a problem.

    It's much nicer riding without a backpack on IMO, but needs must and I'd take a proper MTB Natural ride over a road ride any day!
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • lastwords
    lastwords Posts: 304
    doug5_10 wrote:
    I think it stems from MTBers using Camelbaks instead of bidons, hence can't really have anything in jersey pockets, hence it becomes a backpack. I presume the whole moving-the-saddle-up-and-down-thing (i'm a seasoned MTBer, can you tell :wink:) prevents the use of saddle packs, hence that will go in a backpack as well. And if you're off into the wildy-wild, you need a bit more kit. Since roadies have none of these issues (unless you're Tommy V in the Tour of Belgium!!) ergo: no Backpacks.

    And its against the rules

    And you look like a Bumbly (same effect as reflectors, bells, mirrors, baggy lycra etc....)


    and all this
  • verylonglegs
    verylonglegs Posts: 3,954
    I thought MTB riding leans towards use of backpacks as a lot more vibration and shock comes with off-road riding and so anything you carry is kept more secure in one well fitted pack?
  • chrisaonabike
    chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    Mud and vibration are just wrong.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • RandG
    RandG Posts: 779
    Jeez :shock: that's a fair amount of replies in such a short time :lol: and it all makes sense.

    Tis a fair point about mtb'ers being out in the wild, I carry a spare rear mech went out mtb'ing, can't see many roadies carrying them :roll:
  • Sirius631
    Sirius631 Posts: 991
    Backpacks stress the core muscles of the torso, leading to earlier onset of fatigue. Loads would be more evenly distributed on the skeleton if the pack slung under the chest. This arrangement would be more aerodynamic too. Unfortunately for women, they already have something in the way. :lol:
    To err is human, but to make a real balls up takes a super computer.
  • Sirius631
    Sirius631 Posts: 991
    edited May 2013
    RandG wrote:
    Jeez :shock: that's a fair amount of replies in such a short time :lol: and it all makes sense.

    Tis a fair point about mtb'ers being out in the wild, I carry a spare rear mech went out mtb'ing, can't see many roadies carrying them :roll:

    If we wreck a mech then we strip it off and shorten the chain so that it runs mid-block as a single speed.
    To err is human, but to make a real balls up takes a super computer.
  • arthur_scrimshaw
    arthur_scrimshaw Posts: 2,596
    ddraver wrote:
    As an MTB convert to the dark side and can say with full assurance that Arthurs first sentence is arsewater of the highest order...

    Yeah well I like a little teasing now and then. I'm afraid to say I agree with most of your post, I use a camelbak and don't have cages on my mtb for that reason, after a few miles in the mud a water bottle is not something I'd want to be sticking in my mouth.... :wink:
  • chrisaonabike
    chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    I use a camelbak and don't have cages on my mtb for that reason, after a few miles in the mud a water bottle is not something I'd want to be sticking in my mouth.... :wink:
    Mud? This is sooooo solving the wrong problem... ;)
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • WindyG
    WindyG Posts: 1,099
    I use a hydration pack with my MTB's as I only use a bottle when racing, normal contents are tube, multitool, food, hanger, first aid kit, pump, rag, levers, ty-wraps, phone, money, car keys and that's about it but as a previous poster has said it really about keeping the weight off the bike as to not effect the handling, I hate using a backpack on the road bike and avoid it if I can. Also the back has saved me from injury a couple of times when i've crashed and landed on my pack, much softer than the ground.
  • crescent
    crescent Posts: 1,201
    I've tried a small rucksack and it can be handy but restrictive, especially when cycling uphill. I find it restricts my breathing as I don't feel as if my chest opens up fully when the shoulder straps are effectively pulling me backwards slightly. Over time you will eventually whittle down what you need to carry and what you don't, usually fits into jersey pockets or a small seat-pack/saddle bag.
    Bianchi ImpulsoBMC Teammachine SLR02 01Trek Domane AL3“When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. “ ~H.G. Wells Edit - "Unless it's a BMX"
  • alihisgreat
    alihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    Chris Bass wrote:
    i commute with a backpack and thats when I do most of my miles so I'd say i have a backpack 90% of the time!

    But you're a commuter then.. not a roadie. This guy is asking about roadies.
  • StillGoing
    StillGoing Posts: 5,211
    RandG wrote:
    Jeez :shock: that's a fair amount of replies in such a short time :lol: and it all makes sense.

    Tis a fair point about mtb'ers being out in the wild, I carry a spare rear mech went out mtb'ing, can't see many roadies carrying them :roll:

    Out in the wild; anyone would think you were all Lofty Wiseman. :D
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    I use a back pack (8Ltr) when I go away for the weekend, but I guess that's 'touring' and not being a roadie:D

    Don't like it, but can't bring myself to fit a beam rack or carradice thingy to my road bike.
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • xscreamsuk
    xscreamsuk Posts: 318
    I occasionally use a back pack on road bike, it's to bring back fish and chips from the pub on an easy recovery day.
  • I do wonder why more of the Pointy Hat Brigade don’t use the very low profile, small capacity Camelbaks in TT’s under their skinsuits. Minimal amount of drag, and surely not having to have a bottle or two on the frame and airflow disturbance reaching down, removing and drinking is an advantage?

    I recall seeing one or two pro’s in the TdF adopting this strategy

    Or is this type of witchcraft outlawed by the Pointy Hat Police?