Buy tools or pay shop?

Riggsy12
Riggsy12 Posts: 156
edited February 2013 in Road beginners
Will need new rear mech and rear cassette fitted this week, will cost me around £20 for the tools. Local bike shop only wants £10 though...

Do you lot do small jobs like this yourself or just pay a shop to do it? I suppose if I invest in the tools I will have them for a good while and also learn more about setting up bikes etc etc... On the downside I could run into trouble and have problems...

Cheers :mrgreen:
«13

Comments

  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    Buy the tools and do it yourself, that's half the pleasure plus the tools should last a lifetime.....
  • estampida
    estampida Posts: 1,008
    tools

    you take the cassette off more than you would think

    and chain changes are not worth paying for

    there is nothing that complicated in gearing and those associated parts on a bike

    see youtube for tutorials

    inside forks and shocks is a different matter.......
  • Pituophis
    Pituophis Posts: 1,025
    Once you have got over the "uncertainty factor" there's nothing difficult to do on a road bike, and as you say, once bought the tools are there for next time :)
  • philwint
    philwint Posts: 763
    I always say: money spent on tools is never money wasted :)
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Both.

    Buy the tools. £20.

    Bodge the repair.

    Pay the LBS to sort the bodge and do the original repair. £25.

    Simples.
  • estampida wrote:
    tools

    you take the cassette off more than you would think

    This.

    Short of frame repairs and the like, a lot of bicycle maintenance is within the reach of the average cyclist, and doesn't require a great many tools. There are exceptions - eg installing and removing headsets requires a number of specialist implements that are expensive and aren't useful for anything else - but the transmission is fundamental and you will work on it often. It's a good idea to take off your cassette/freewheel from time to time to clean it, anyway.
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?
  • marz
    marz Posts: 130
    Buy the tools and learn to do the basics yourself. Eventually saves you money and is very gratifying.

    My cassette and chain replacement time is now down to 10 minutes.
  • Riggsy12
    Riggsy12 Posts: 156
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    Do you know how to get the chain connected back up once it's all done?
  • Riggsy12
    Riggsy12 Posts: 156
    Phil_D wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    Do you know how to get the chain connected back up once it's all done?

    Same way I took it apart right?
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    It might be that simple but I have always had trouble and never managed it. There is a guide on the Park Tools website but I just ended up with a quick release link so I don't have to bother with the extractor tool any more.
  • Riggsy12
    Riggsy12 Posts: 156
    Phil_D wrote:
    It might be that simple but I have always had trouble and never managed it. There is a guide on the Park Tools website but I just ended up with a quick release link so I don't have to bother with the extractor tool any more.

    Cheers for the heads up, I seen a few vids on what I need to do, I'll be sure to check some on chain fitting too!

    Do I need to grease anything on these two jobs? Should I buy some grease? Water proof grease?
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Presumably you realised that the left pedal has a reverse thread?
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    Navrig wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Chances are you can remove and refit chain, mech and cassette without the use of a spanner of any kind.
  • JackPozzi
    JackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    I'm assuming the spanner is for cassette tools? Should be fine for that
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Phil_D wrote:
    Navrig wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Chances are you can remove and refit chain, mech and cassette without the use of a spanner of any kind.


    +1 but he will need allen keys.
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    Don't think there will be any need for Grease, but lube will be a must once everything has been fitted. Dry lube/wet lube, take your pick, but it will help stop everything going rusty.
  • edhornby
    edhornby Posts: 1,780
    buy the tools from the LBS and ask them to show you how to use it properly (go on a day when they aren't mad busy)
    "I get paid to make other people suffer on my wheel, how good is that"
    --Jens Voight
  • Riggsy12
    Riggsy12 Posts: 156
    Phil_D wrote:
    Navrig wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Chances are you can remove and refit chain, mech and cassette without the use of a spanner of any kind.

    How would you loose the cassettes lockring without a spanner?
  • flasher
    flasher Posts: 1,734
    Phil_D wrote:
    Do you know how to get the chain connected back up once it's all done?


    KMC quick link, simple.
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Navrig wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Chances are you can remove and refit chain, mech and cassette without the use of a spanner of any kind.

    How would you loose the cassettes lockring without a spanner?

    I use a socket but if I had to use a spanner I'd only use the right size. Adjustables tend to flex too much for my ham fisted approach.
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Navrig wrote:
    Riggsy12 wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    Is that £20 for just the tools you need, or £20 for a whole load of tools, some of which you don't need now?

    Just spent around £30, I needed...

    Adjustable spanner
    Shimano cassette removal tool
    Campagnolo cassette removal tool
    freewheel chainwhip
    Chain splitter tool

    Cheers for the replys, I'm going to give it ago myself doesn't look too hard... I'm normaly quite good with things like this I think what put me off was not being able to get my pedals off, had to go to my local bike shop for something as easy as that becuase I didnt have a long enough wrench :roll:

    I haven't used a spanner in earnest on a bike for a long time. Adjustable spanners are notoriously difficult to use effectively so be very careful you don't either round off bolts/nuts and skin your knuckles.

    If you need a couple of spanners it is well worth buying the right size with an open end and a ring end.

    Chances are you can remove and refit chain, mech and cassette without the use of a spanner of any kind.

    How would you loose the cassettes lockring without a spanner?

    The tool I have uses an allen key, although yours could be spanner I guess.
  • Phil_D
    Phil_D Posts: 467
    And by the way, if your cassette has been on for any great length of time, prepare yourself for a struggle getting the lock ring off. Plenty of leverage will be needed. And don't do what I did last week and take half your knuckles off on the teeth of the sprockets.
  • Riggsy12
    Riggsy12 Posts: 156
    Phil_D wrote:
    And by the way, if your cassette has been on for any great length of time, prepare yourself for a struggle getting the lock ring off. Plenty of leverage will be needed. And don't do what I did last week and take half your knuckles off on the teeth of the sprockets.

    Ok cheers, but I'll probably leave it on, getting new Campy wheels and new cassette to match :mrgreen:
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Phil_D wrote:
    And by the way, if your cassette has been on for any great length of time, prepare yourself for a struggle getting the lock ring off. Plenty of leverage will be needed. And don't do what I did last week and take half your knuckles off on the teeth of the sprockets.

    Using a chainwhip and socket on the cassette removal tool I find the best way to loosen it off without skinning your knuckles is to roughly line the tool handles up and then try and move them apart - as opposed to having them at opposite sides of the wheel or even 90° to each other ...

    I usually do it with the wheel on it's side - and pull it into my body for stability ...

    Anyone got suggestions on other easy ways to do this?
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    Riggsy12 have a read of the info on Parktools for how to do XY and Z.

    they also list which of their tools are needed. (others are available).
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • JackPozzi
    JackPozzi Posts: 1,191
    Slowbike wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    And by the way, if your cassette has been on for any great length of time, prepare yourself for a struggle getting the lock ring off. Plenty of leverage will be needed. And don't do what I did last week and take half your knuckles off on the teeth of the sprockets.

    Using a chainwhip and socket on the cassette removal tool I find the best way to loosen it off without skinning your knuckles is to roughly line the tool handles up and then try and move them apart - as opposed to having them at opposite sides of the wheel or even 90° to each other ...

    I usually do it with the wheel on it's side - and pull it into my body for stability ...

    Anyone got suggestions on other easy ways to do this?

    If it's that bad you can clamp the cassette tool in a vice and turn the wheel
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    Get a toolkit, I got a cheap decent one as recommended in C+ and it's marvellous, the feeling of being able to do even simple stuff is ace, eg changing a cassette. Pay around £70-100, much cheaper than buying bits separately, you'll soon get the money back in saved workshop bills :D

    Plus you're more likely to look after your bike if you have the tools to do it

    A stand is a great investment as well - I bought mind from Revolution bikes (Edinburgh) for about £40-50 in the sale, bulky but really makes looking after the bike easier

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    JackPozzi wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    Phil_D wrote:
    And by the way, if your cassette has been on for any great length of time, prepare yourself for a struggle getting the lock ring off. Plenty of leverage will be needed. And don't do what I did last week and take half your knuckles off on the teeth of the sprockets.

    Using a chainwhip and socket on the cassette removal tool I find the best way to loosen it off without skinning your knuckles is to roughly line the tool handles up and then try and move them apart - as opposed to having them at opposite sides of the wheel or even 90° to each other ...

    I usually do it with the wheel on it's side - and pull it into my body for stability ...

    Anyone got suggestions on other easy ways to do this?

    If it's that bad you can clamp the cassette tool in a vice and turn the wheel

    I have them at 90 degrees to ech other, grab a handful of spokes with the chain whip and then I only have to move the socket.