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Running!

GraydawgGraydawg Posts: 673
edited June 2009 in Health, fitness & training
Well I started training for running a 10k in September.

So started with a 4 mile circuit I'm doing where I do periods of work / recover right the way round. Now I'd say I am pretty fit, but not super fit... I mean I can comfortably spin on a bike for hours on end, do weights etc.... but OW my legs are hurting today!

Did 4 miles on tuesday and stretched off as normal.
Recovered yesterday.
Did 4 miles again this morning.

My muscles are aching in the legs so I'm hoping that pushing through it I will be able to get past the pain barrier and into a comfortable running routine!

Any suggestions? Am I doing anything wrong if my legs are aching? Failing that, some words of encouragement / or other stories of you guys running would be good to see!

My Inspiration is that I've been watching ITV's reality program "the biggest loser".....

thinking - if they can do it then so can I!!!

Wish me luck!!! :D
It's been a while...
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Posts

  • Maull ManMaull Man Posts: 13
    I'm training for the same thing at the moment - 10k

    My local running shop suggested to try the following weekly routine to get there as quickly as possible....

    Monday - 5k as fast as you can

    Wednesday - interval train by running up the steepest hill you can find as fast as you can then walking back down...repeat 4 to 5 times or for approx 20 mins. This needs to be as hard as possible

    Friday - the distance run...I'm at 7k this week and it's suggested you don't increase more than 10% each week. But basically as far as possible without an eye on the clock

    On the other days I'm still on the weights or the bike in the gym to keep the rest of me in shape

    Hope that helps - oh and lastly if you can run with others then do it !!...
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I have done a number of off road 10k races - best result is 42 mins and 5th out of 700, worst was my first with 52nd out of 170 and 52 mins (it was hideously boggy!) and several results in between.

    If you're new to it then you will ache - and a day is plenty for recovery. Just build up but vary your distances. Try and run more than 10k on a few runs so the 10k distance is easier. Are you doing a road or off road 10k?

    I found that many years of daily cycling really helped with a decent core fitness that translated straight to running fitness.
  • GraydawgGraydawg Posts: 673
    Doing a road 10k - got plenty time for training so I'm not concerned about it as yet, but you're right I need to build on my stamina as I'm still in the process of running for about 1-2 minutes then walking for 1 minute then pushing myself again.

    I've been setting markers, like road signs, ends of peoples driveways etc(i'm fortunate to live near the countryside where there is some really nice country roads with little traffic!) where I go for it and then back off. It seems to be working but jeepers I want my legs to get better and fast!! :cry:

    It seems to be helping with a bit of weight loss too - as Its a change in excercise I guess. But delighted as I'm having salads for lunch time too - and seem to have lost 3 lbs this week! :lol:

    So I think the pain is worth it in the long "run" :)
    It's been a while...
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Gray - tee hee.

    Seeing as where you live, I highly recommend getting some hills into your run. It's much better than interval training (less boring) and does the same sort of job and makes you a more "rounded" (not literally) runner. Pounding endless road miles can get dull and is bad for your knees - that's why I run off road (plus I can take the dog!)

    4 miles runs at such an early stage is flipping good going though.
  • SarnianSarnian Posts: 1,451
    All I can say Is a lot of people rush Into running then get put off, take easy to begin with remember rest days and mix It up a bit fast short runs and slow longer runs.

    If you are doing a 10k probably best to aim for a hour run with out stopping.
    It's not a ornament, so ride It
  • mea00csfmea00csf Posts: 558
    i think going out and trying to run 4 miles from no running is too much, build it up slowly and increase by 10% every other week.

    keep the interest by doing a mixture of sessions, i'm training for a half marathon (up to 19km now :D ) and am using this basic training plan:

    saturday or sunday: long steady run (used to build up milage and time on my feet)

    monday: slow recovery

    wednesday: temp runs eg 10min warm up, 3 x 12m at tempo pace with 2 mins rest between, 10 min cool down

    friday: intervals eg warm up, 8 x 60sec sprints (or hill runs) with 2mins rest between, cool down.
  • OwenBOwenB Posts: 606
    There are quite a lot of tips for starting running, particularly on runners world website, they've got some short programmes to get you from no running at all to running a 5K race in only 6 weeks time, I followed that programme when I started doing a bit of running last year and I was doing 45 minute 10K's in 12 weeks from starting, I think it's all about taking it easy at the start and building up to it. I personally found that once I could run for half an hour non stop it wasn't that difficult to maintain pace and keep going, I was going to test this theory in a half marathon but unfortunately got ill and I've not managed to get going on running again yet :(
  • tlw1tlw1 Posts: 19,457
    I keep trying to run - but always end up with a sore knee (outside). It is getting on my nerves! As I don't always have the time for a decent cycle & a quick hour run works a treat!
  • punctureboypunctureboy Posts: 217
    get a heartrate monitor if you can. you can pick them up for next to nothing these days. most of your running should be done at 60-70% of your working heartrate (ie the difference between your resting heartrate and your maximum.) which is steady jog pace if your reasonably fit.

    as you have plenty of time to train for this, spend all your running time at this pace for at least 2 months preferably 3. this allows your body to adapt to the stresses and strains of running, slowly and gradually and hopefully you'll avoid injury. in this time do one longer run per week and 2-3 shorter runs. only add 10% time per week. your long run isn't about how far you run, its time on your feet running. make sure you keep within the heartrate. ideally by the end of your training you'll be running double the race distance. your other runs should be relative to the time you do your long run. so if your long run is 40 mins then your shorter runs should be 20-30 mins. build these up to 40 as your longer run increases.

    after the first 2-3 months you can start introducing some speed work. start with one run per week at 80% heart rate. warm up well then run at 80% for 20 minutes. over the weeks build it up to 40 mins. this builds up speed endurance, teaches your body to deal with lactic acid, and builds strength.

    after a couple of weeks of this you can introduce intervals to really add some speed. try 6 x 400m at 90s per interval with 90 seconds rest in between, and try adding an extra lap per week. or 3 x 800m at 3 mins, with 3 mins rest. also add some hill reps one per week/ fortnight.

    sorry for the long post but this will get you fitter than you ever thought possible without burning out/ injury/ or quitting. at the end you'll have 3 main sessions per week. long, threshold (80%), and intervals. the rest of your time is made up of steady jogs or cross training. good luck.
  • Ditch WitchDitch Witch Posts: 837
    Have you been fitted for trainers? You could have an over/under pronation that needs correcting?
    I ride like a girl
    Start: 16.5.x Now: 14.10.8 Goal: 11.7.x
    www.ditchwitch.me.uk
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    Specialized HardRock Pro Disc 04
  • mea00csfmea00csf Posts: 558
    Personally i HATE heart rate monitors, the mojority of people who use them don't set them up properly, the whole thing about staying within the 60-70% limit is only applicable if you've worked out your max heart rate properly, which 99% of people who use HRM don't bother to do. If you want to get a bit geeky about the whole thing without using heart rate monitors you can do similar using pace.

    I did a 5km time trial, and input the time into this website:
    http://www.runbayou.com/jackd.htm

    Which then gives you speeds to train to, after a month, do another time trial and adjust your training paces. I use a garmin and footpod or gps.
  • punctureboypunctureboy Posts: 217
    were not talking world class accuracy here, even if your max heart rate is wrong by 10bpm it wont make a huge difference to your overall heartrate zones. plus when your working in a zone of 10%, accuracy isn't hugely important.

    they are a great tool for beginners or people who have no idea about how each effort level should feel.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I'm anti HRM too - just flipping well run!
    Just won an off road Sprint triathlon - the running was my secret weapon!
  • mea00csfmea00csf Posts: 558
    were not talking world class accuracy here, even if your max heart rate is wrong by 10bpm it wont make a huge difference to your overall heartrate zones. plus when your working in a zone of 10%, accuracy isn't hugely important.

    they are a great tool for beginners or people who have no idea about how each effort level should feel.

    I just don't think there's much point in unsing tools like that unless you use them correctly.

    I did a 10km race at the weekend, and at least 50% of people set off waaay to fast and blew up at around 2-3km. A quick look at the pace after a few hundred metres told me i was running way too fast, despite feeling fairly comfortable dropped it down and let everyone overtake me as i knew i couldn't keep that pace going for more than a few km. Overtook loads of people around the 2-3km mark as they all blew up from their early fast pace.

    Personal choice really, HRM are a love/hate thing. i already have a tight band round my rib cage from a sports bra. Don't want another one, and the band wouldn't be easy to position being quite small.
  • punctureboypunctureboy Posts: 217
    surf matt was that the x trail race near plymouth? i was going to enter that but had to change plans at the last minute. my mate did it and said the kayak phase was cancelled due to choppy conditions.

    mea00csf, i agree they are a bit of a personal thing, but i definately think they are a help for beginners. you need some level of experience to be able to judge the pace well. i dont have the sports bra problem although i could maybe do with one lol :oops:
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Puncture - that's the one. I did the swim one though. Was really gutted for the kayakers!
  • punctureboypunctureboy Posts: 217
    yeah i reckon it would be good fun as a pair as well. are you gonna do the others? i cant do the next one but hope to do the third one, and plan to try a proper tri in the mean time.
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    I think I will - really did enjoy the one at the weekend. Might do the same too - might get a Tricross for it too :wink::lol:
  • Robmanic1Robmanic1 Posts: 2,150
    Half marathon in 4 weeks! So trawled the t'interweb for training tips and guess what? No schedule as 4 weeks is considered not enough time from scratch, knew these runners were mary-queens!

    Seriously though, haven't run since Feb, was doing up to 10k training runs and then just stopped so this half-marathon is the perfect excuse to start again. Did a 5 miler tonight and didn't find it too bad (about 40 mins).

    Any quick -fix tips welcome (sorry to the OP for hijack).
    Pictures are better than words because some words are big and hard to understand.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3336802663/
  • blablablacksheepblablablacksheep Posts: 1,627
    i could use some advise too.

    i currently training for the forces and typically i have had a few injurys, like knee/tibia/shins ect

    i just got my insoles for my shoes so going to try get back into it.,

    i did a 5 mile run a few weeks ago, it pretty hilly, and i got 40 mins :(

    i can do 2 mile run in under 14mins and can do a 3 mile run around 21:30-22:30.

    i trying to get my 5 miler time down to around 35 mins and my 3 miler time down to 21:00

    do you recon it possible to get from 22:30-22:00 to 21:00 in about 2 months?
    London2Brighton Challange 100k!
    http://www.justgiving.com/broxbourne-runners
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Rob - just keep doing what you're doing - sounds fine to me.

    Blabla - errrmmm - those are pretty good times! Do some interval training and you'll get that time fine. Most would be very chuffed with those mile times!
  • Robmanic1Robmanic1 Posts: 2,150
    Cheers Matt, I don't care what toastie seays, I reckon you're ok! :wink:
    Pictures are better than words because some words are big and hard to understand.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3336802663/
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Rob - we reached an "understanding" basically that we are both a bit mad) via PMs!

    Phew!

    Good luck with the running - 40 mins for a 5 miler is good going. Try and lock into a fast "plod" and zone out if you can. I finding thinking about the running too much makes it much worse. Concentrate on the scenery or similar if you can!
  • Robmanic1Robmanic1 Posts: 2,150
    That's true Matt, I find if I concentrate too hard on breathing it becomes laboured, if I think about other stuff, or listen to my mp3, my breathing becomes more natural.

    4 weeks isn't a long time to prep, but I reckon, with my base fitness from riding and circuit training, if I can get 2 x 5 mile runs and maybe a longer run in every week I should be ok. I'm not looking to break any records for the half, but don't want to embarrass myself (my work are sponsoring the event so there will be some colleagues running too). Also need to carry on with the circuit training once a week and two rides a week (minimum), so it's going to be a hard few weeks, need to find some time for recovery too.

    Looks like;

    Sunday - long MTB ride, Monday - 5 mile run, Tues - circs, Weds - road ride, Thurs - run, Fri - rest, Sat - run (or) road ride.

    Is that too much do you reckon? Am I at risk of over-training?
    Pictures are better than words because some words are big and hard to understand.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3336802663/
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Rob - I'm probably not the best person to ask about over training but your routine looks fine to me - just don't make the rides proper epics! Cycling really helps running fitness I have found.
  • Robmanic1Robmanic1 Posts: 2,150
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    Rob - I'm probably not the best person to ask about over training but your routine looks fine to me - just don't make the rides proper epics! Cycling really helps running fitness I have found.

    Thanks bud, how about the week prior to the event, should I rest for 2-3 days before?

    (Again, apologies for the hijack OP, hopefully some of the advice will be of use to you as well .)
    Pictures are better than words because some words are big and hard to understand.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3336802663/
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Rob - definitely stay off the running for two days before the event. Try and drink nothing (as in booze) the night before if possible (always tricky at weekends) and have a massive pasta or rice supper too.

    That should help!
  • Surf-MattSurf-Matt Posts: 5,952
    Run along please Mr Troll... :roll:
  • I'll leave the running to you guys for now... I did the Great Manchester Run 10K last week and although enjoyable, think i'll stick to cycling for now at least.

    Will try it again tho, want to get under an hour - was out by 5 mins this time, but it was my first ever 10K.
    Do it.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    Surf-Matt wrote:
    Run along please Mr Troll... :roll:

    report the post dont just reply.

    thanks.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
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