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Bike Fit issues - Saddle/Groin Sores

deano802deano802 Posts: 67
edited September 2018 in Training, fitness and health
Started riding seriously about a year ago and suffered from saddle issues from the start until February when I changed to a wide specialized power saddle, which seemed to fix any issues. Had a bike fit in may just to check everything out, guy at our club is osteopath/bike fitter. He lowered saddle by 1.5cm and moved forward about the same with the reasoning that I was getting a lot of hip movement/rocking. We also spaced out my pedals by 20mm as I have extreme toe out. All this worked a treat and I seem to be putting out more power for longer on flat and climbs but it has caused extreme friction/chaffing of my lower buttock crease into back of groin area which in turn is causing lumps and sores. I need to make an adjustment to fix this but cannot find a correlation between what change is causing the issue, started by moving seat back 1cm but hasn't improved.
Does anyone have any ideas?

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,402
    Reset your position back to how it was before the club guy adjusted it and start again. So bring the saddle back, raise it again and lose the pedal spacers (20mm, seriously?)
  • deano802deano802 Posts: 67
    Imposter wrote:
    Reset your position back to how it was before the club guy adjusted it and start again. So bring the saddle back, raise it again and lose the pedal spacers (20mm, seriously?)

    I will try resetting saddle tonight, maybe just start with raising1cm.

    Regarding the pedal spacing, this has been a game changer for me, I have an extreme toe out gait, my 5 year old daughter asks why I walk like a duck. If I have my feet straight I have muscle restriction from ankle up to knee, with the spacers and my speedplays set to max toe out my muscles have complete freedom of movement to actually put power in.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,402
    Deano802 wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    Reset your position back to how it was before the club guy adjusted it and start again. So bring the saddle back, raise it again and lose the pedal spacers (20mm, seriously?)

    I will try resetting saddle tonight, maybe just start with raising1cm.

    Regarding the pedal spacing, this has been a game changer for me, I have an extreme toe out gait, my 5 year old daughter asks why I walk like a duck. If I have my feet straight I have muscle restriction from ankle up to knee, with the spacers and my speedplays set to max toe out my muscles have complete freedom of movement to actually put power in.

    Fair enough - but did you have the saddle sores before you added the spacers? Something like this needs a total reset, IMO. Improving power on the bike is great - but if you can't actually sit on the bike, then what use is it?
  • deano802deano802 Posts: 67
    Imposter wrote:
    Deano802 wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    Reset your position back to how it was before the club guy adjusted it and start again. So bring the saddle back, raise it again and lose the pedal spacers (20mm, seriously?)

    I will try resetting saddle tonight, maybe just start with raising1cm.

    Regarding the pedal spacing, this has been a game changer for me, I have an extreme toe out gait, my 5 year old daughter asks why I walk like a duck. If I have my feet straight I have muscle restriction from ankle up to knee, with the spacers and my speedplays set to max toe out my muscles have complete freedom of movement to actually put power in.

    Fair enough - but did you have the saddle sores before you added the spacers? Something like this needs a total reset, IMO. Improving power on the bike is great - but if you can't actually sit on the bike, then what use is it?

    Everything was changed at same time, I think reset the saddle and see how it feels, I suppose I will just have to tinker around on the trainer for a couple of hours, annoying as I just wanted to get everything set then just worry about riding, but i do need to fix the soreness post ride. I almost have a feeling that now the seat is lower i am sitting more into it causing more pressure and the chaffing but very difficult to identify exactly.
  • riekorieko Posts: 121
    Are you using Chamois cream? Perhaps your developing sores because you are working harder on the bike, going out on longer rides and as a result, chafing a bit more.

    I use chamois cream for any ride over 25/30 miles.

    A good dollop of decent chamois cream on your contact points should help. Work some into the pad on your bibs, especially the seams and hopefully it should reduce the friction significantly. As for your existing sores, rest and antiseptic cream should to the trick.
    Giant TCR
    Giant TCX
  • Deano802 wrote:
    guy at our club is osteopath/bike fitter

    Hope he's better at being an osteopath. Listen to Imposter
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • DeVlaeminckDeVlaeminck Posts: 7,393
    It may just be a case of using a different saddle - if you have sores presumably that is caused by friction - different shorts may also help but I'm guessing you don't just have one pair so unless they are all the same the saddle probably more the issue with the new position. I used to suffer saddle sores on one side but haven't for years - unfortunately I can't tell you what the difference is but I would guess it's a different saddle.

    As far as the changes go - not saying the guy was wrong but he's made major changes there in one go - saddle down 2cm is huge and moving it forward 1.5 at the same time has effectively lowered you even more - then as someone else said 2cm pedal spacers is massive - again you may benefit but think I'd have tried 5mm first and gone from there. I'd row back a bit on the changes and if you are convinced by the pedal spacers I'd go half way back up and back with the saddle and see how that goes - you may have to give it time as once the sores are there they aren't going to vanish over night.
    [Castle Donington Ladies FC - going up in '22]
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,031
    Positioning is probably the key. Racing/hard ride efforts = on the rivet as one says , can = a sore.
    Management by trial and error or amend your cycling to just going for a loaf of bread ride.
    Cycling over the years has done things to my body that at least a consultant has given me the all clear to carry on but it was slightly worrying at the time.

    I wish it was as easy as saying use this cream and all will be well.
    What suits one person is never going to be a fix for another.
  • If your power output is higher and more consistent then the bike fit is almost certainly better than it was. Don’t mess with it. From what you say it sounds like your riding technique is what you need to work on. Try actively taking more weight on your legs whilst riding normally and resist the temptation to slump ( for want of a better description ) on the saddle too much and standing up for a bit every now and again should help.
  • deano802deano802 Posts: 67
    Thanks for input, I have gradually raised saddle back up over last week and seems to be better in terms of less friction in the problem areas. I am riding a bit more on the rivet of the saddle but world say 8 out of 10 comfort so will stick with it and see what it feels like on some longer rides.
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    I also use the 20mm pedal extenders because of toe out/wide hips. They really help with the hips/knees and don't feel these areas sore or hear clicking sounds on my joints anymore, wish I had found about them few years ago when I started. This is another issue with manufacturers making frames that do not suit everyone since we are all different and why bike fit is important.

    Saddle sores could be related to saddle height (too high will cause friction, too low will cause pressure), saddle shape/width, bib shorts (wrong size or not good enough), hygiene etc. You could use tea tree oil or chamois cream before and after the ride, wash the bib shorts every time and don't stay on them after a ride. My guess is your saddle, is it the 155mm one? Have you measured your sit bones? This is how you sit on the saddle: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... smp-seats/

    If something is pulling you from the sweet spot it can be the saddle fore/aft or cleat placement.
  • deano802deano802 Posts: 67
    zefs wrote:
    I also use the 20mm pedal extenders because of toe out/wide hips. They really help with the hips/knees and don't feel these areas sore or hear clicking sounds on my joints anymore, wish I had found about them few years ago when I started. This is another issue with manufacturers making frames that do not suit everyone since we are all different and why bike fit is important.

    Saddle sores could be related to saddle height (too high will cause friction, too low will cause pressure), saddle shape/width, bib shorts (wrong size or not good enough), hygiene etc. You could use tea tree oil or chamois cream before and after the ride, wash the bib shorts every time and don't stay on them after a ride. My guess is your saddle, is it the 155mm one? Have you measured your sit bones? This is how you sit on the saddle: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... smp-seats/

    If something is pulling you from the sweet spot it can be the saddle fore/aft or cleat placement.

    Yes 155 measured at the specialized store near me.

    What spacers are you using, i bought some very light ones from China and I am very happy with them, half the weight, half the price and very well machined.
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    I got the ones from bikefit.com
  • zefs wrote:
    Saddle sores could be related to saddle height (too high will cause friction, too low will cause pressure), saddle shape/width, bib shorts (wrong size or not good enough), hygiene etc. You could use tea tree oil or chamois cream before and after the ride, wash the bib shorts every time and don't stay on them after a ride. My guess is your saddle, is it the 155mm one? Have you measured your sit bones? This is how you sit on the saddle: https://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bi ... smp-seats/

    If something is pulling you from the sweet spot it can be the saddle fore/aft or cleat placement.
    I found that article really interesting.

    I'm part of the 25% minority the article suggests for whom the traditional sit bone method may not work. Whilst the sit bone method suggests a medium width saddle for me the front of my pelvis is wider and so prefers a saddle with a wider cut out.

    Having done a sit bone test I'd tried a couple of medium width SMPs but the front didn't support me comfortably so changed to an SMP Avant with its wider cut out and problem solved. The extra width at the back has the potential for sores but hasn't proved to be a problem as I'm not relying so much on that area for support.
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    @Deano802
    Did you manage to fix your saddle sore issues? It could be that the side that you are getting them needs to come closer to the bike because with the pedal extenders and 155mm saddle your cleat position needs to be tuned. You could try adjust the cleat to move that leg further in.
  • zefs wrote:
    @Deano802
    Did you manage to fix your saddle sore issues? It could be that the side that you are getting them needs to come closer to the bike because with the pedal extenders and 155mm saddle your cleat position needs to be tuned. You could try adjust the cleat to move that leg further in.

    Not 100% solved but raising saddle and adjusting fore/aft has helped a lot.
  • zefszefs Posts: 484
    Ok, good to hear! :)
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