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Cutting a fork steerer

samg123samg123 Posts: 275
edited August 2012 in Workshop
Got a new frame today and the headtube is markedly shorter than my old setup. As I'm hoping to transfer the old fork over and don't want to much of a stack, how can I cut the steerer, bearing in mind there's already a star nut in there...

Posts

  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    Use a saw and get a new star nut. Simples.
  • johnsavjohnsav Posts: 775
    hmmm, careful though. If you cut it wonky the star nut will be a total a** to get in.
  • estampidaestampida Posts: 1,008
    a little fiddly to fit, but worth it


    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Mode ... tAodZk4AMQ
  • Would recommend a pipe cutter rather than a saw every time for a clean straight cut - pretty idiot proof.
    Also with the star nut, use a small screw driver that will go through the hole in the middle and give you something to tap on to move it down - go with gentle small taps, moving a little down at a time and if it starts to drift away from being straight then its easy to adjust with a few taps at a different angle.

    Did it myself the other day for the first time and surprised just how easy it was to do - just don't rush it...and of course measure twice!
  • mcp73mcp73 Posts: 92
    Your LBS may be able to do this for you. I took a fork to them to be cut (once I'd measured and marked it) and they very kindly did it FOC. It's worth a shot. If they charge, I doubt they'd ask for any more than a fiver.
  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,438
    samg123 wrote:
    Got a new frame today and the headtube is markedly shorter than my old setup. As I'm hoping to transfer the old fork over and don't want to much of a stack, how can I cut the steerer, bearing in mind there's already a star nut in there...
    Hmm.... your legs haven't changed length so your saddle will still be the same height. It follows that the bar-saddle-BB relationship should remain, regardless of frame size. If you transfer your forks then it follows that the stem fits in the same place. Therefore you naturally end up with more spacers because of the shorter head tube and do not need to cut the steerer any further. Unless your bars are currently too high and you bought the new frame deliberately to get them lower?
  • I cut a fork and did loads of reading around it on the interweb and one thing I came across was a guy with exactly your problem and the advice was to bash the star nut down into the steerer.....then cut and go and buy another star nut. Seemed an awful lot of faffing for no gain to me.

    Personally I'd let your LBS do it.
    The dissenter is every human being at those moments of his life when he resigns
    momentarily from the herd and thinks for himself.
  • The_JMLThe_JML Posts: 132
    why the hell would you bash one starnut down the steerer then fit another one???

    just put a philips screwdriver in the screw hole of the starnut and hammer slightly until it is 1cm below the intended cut line. then just use a hacksaw and line it up straight. I did this five minutes ago which was ironic. I don't understand why you would compromise riding position for a spacer free cockpit though?
  • P_TuckerP_Tucker Posts: 1,878
    The_JML wrote:
    why the hell would you bash one starnut down the steerer then fit another one???

    just put a philips screwdriver in the screw hole of the starnut and hammer slightly until it is 1cm below the intended cut line. then just use a hacksaw and line it up straight. I did this five minutes ago which was ironic. I don't understand why you would compromise riding position for a spacer free cockpit though?

    Looks awesome
  • Wirral_paulWirral_paul Posts: 2,476
    As Me-109 says - it would be wise to start off with the same position as your old frame. If you think you can go lower then use max 5mm spacers to put your stem in the same place as previously, and then work downwards by moving the spacers from underneath to on top one at a time. At least then you can try out the new position before commiting. I've done the same with both of my current bikes, and moved down by 10mm over the past 18 months
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