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Opinions on bovine colostrum

EasyTomEasyTom Posts: 46
edited July 2007 in Pro race
I'm trying a colostrum supplement in the mornings and have found that I haven't caught a bug since, which is nice - but have no serious proof that it's done anything. My performance is improving, but it would be anyway because I'm new to racing. I was wondering if anyone else on this forum is using it and has any strong opinions or has been involved in tests that have proved the efficacy of colostrum? [:)]
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Tom -
http://www.sharpenson.co.uk

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  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, Verdana" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by EasyTom</i>

    I'm trying a colostrum supplement in the mornings and have found
    that I haven't caught a bug since, which is nice - but have no serious
    proof that it's done anything. My performance is improving, but it would
    be anyway because I'm new to racing. I was wondering if anyone else on
    this forum is using it and has any strong opinions or has been involved
    in tests that have proved the efficacy of colostrum? [:)]
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

    A couple of comments:
    - have you thought about how they get this stuff? (I don't suppose it can be that pleasant for the cow or calf)
    - colostrum is supposed to protect the <i>immune-naive</i> newborn calf. Presumably there is a similar colostrum for humans. However, adult humans are not immune-naive, so I would doubt very much that there is any significant benefit in taking colostrum.

    In any case, if you are happy spending the money, and <i>you</i> think it is having a beneficial effect, you might as well carry on. It at least benefits a section of the national economy. There's also the potential for a placebo effect. Mind you I have never taken colostrum, and I cannot remember the last time I had a cold.

    Have you done a google scholar search for reputable scientific publications that investigate its efficacy?

    Robert


    www.northbucksroadclub.org.uk
    www.robertsaunders.org.uk
    www.northwoodwheelers.org.uk
  • I didn't know about Google's scholar search - thanks. I've looked now and research seems to show that it improves time trial times and resistance to upper respiratory tract infections if you consume a fair amount of the stuff.

    It sounds perhaps though like the benefits aren't big enough to be of serious help to average racers so I think I'm going to forget it and spend the money on saving up for some nice Shamal wheels instead (which should speed me up without the 'orrible taste!). [:p]
  • MelproMelpro Posts: 35
    I saw a programme once where they tested non competitive athletes using a variety of different performancing enhancing drugs.

    One group were given colostrum and it did seem to make a difference.

    My Dad is a Dairy farmer and has plenty of colostrum. It's naturally produced when a cow first calves. It never goes into the milk supply and neither of us have ever fancied trying it.

    It looks manky and is best left for the calves.[xx(]
  • Presumably to obtain the colostrum, one needs to deprive the calf of it, which seems a little harsh on it!
    I always take TV programmes' experiments with a pinch of salt - usually the sample size is small, making the result statistically insignificant, also there are usually problems with control experiments and whether or not the experiments were really double-blind - remember placebo effects!

    Robert

    www.northbucksroadclub.org.uk
    www.robertsaunders.org.uk
    www.northwoodwheelers.org.uk
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, Verdana" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Thomas Sharpe</i>

    I didn't know about Google's scholar search - thanks. I've looked now and research seems to show that it improves time trial times and resistance to upper respiratory tract infections if you consume a fair amount of the stuff.

    It sounds perhaps though like the benefits aren't big enough to be of serious help to average racers so I think I'm going to forget it and spend the money on saving up for some nice Shamal wheels instead (which should speed me up without the 'orrible taste!). [:p]
    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

    It's usually quite difficult for me to get to the bottom of what sports science publications <i>really</i> show with their data. I am a scientist, but not a sports scientist, and I usually perceive shortcomings that include small sample size (leads to statistically insignificant results), choice of participant (whether well-trained or untrained - and how are these defined), whether experiments are (or can ever be) truly double blind, whether the parameters measured are truly realistic measures of athletic improvement and so on.

    Generally, if something's touted as a miracle performance enhancer, my sceptical alarm bells start sounding. There's no escape from the hard work of training. I am going to find this in the 2007 season, as my work life over the winter has taken its toll on my training....[:(]

    Robert

    www.northbucksroadclub.org.uk
    www.robertsaunders.org.uk
    www.northwoodwheelers.org.uk
  • grimpeurgrimpeur Posts: 230
    Read the FAQ on www.neovite.com it will clear up many misconceptions mentioned here...

    http://www.neovite.com/faq/Default.asp

    e.g.

    -What about the calf?

    -The colostrum used to make neovite is taken from the cow within the first 48 hours of calving. A cow produces enough colostrum and milk for twins, although these are very rare. It is essential that the calf obtains colostrum immediately after birth and then at least 2 litres of colostrum within the first 12 hours of calving for its survival. Only the surplus first milk can be collected to make neovite.

    I have tried it and did feel a bit better but don't think the cost justifies improvements that can be gained through improving your diet and getting more rest.
  • <blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Arial, Helvetica, Verdana" id="quote">quote:<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by grimpeur</i>

    Read the FAQ on www.neovite.com it will clear up many misconceptions mentioned here...

    http://www.neovite.com/faq/Default.asp

    e.g.

    -What about the calf?

    -The colostrum used to make neovite is taken from the cow within the first 48 hours of calving. A cow produces enough colostrum and milk for twins, although these are very rare. It is essential that the calf obtains colostrum immediately after birth and then at least 2 litres of colostrum within the first 12 hours of calving for its survival. Only the surplus first milk can be collected to make neovite.

    I have tried it and did feel a bit better but don't think the cost justifies improvements that can be gained through improving your diet and getting more rest.

    <hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

    But since Neovite sell colostrum, they won't rubbish it on their FAQ, will they!

    Robert


    www.northbucksroadclub.org.uk
    www.robertsaunders.org.uk
    www.northwoodwheelers.org.uk
  • 10speed10speed Posts: 2
    You can buy synthetic colostrum of course - does not have to come from a cow or a mother's breast....yes humans produce it too.

    Training may be a better option than colostrum.
  • OldmacdonaldOldmacdonald Posts: 926
    Quote - GrumpyBob

    "A couple of comments:
    - have you thought about how they get this stuff? (I don't suppose it can be that pleasant for the cow or calf) "



    Same way we get milk, not unpleasant to cow at all.
    MELPRO - Good day to you from a fellow farmer. Once saw a lady make a custard pudding from colostrum - I didn't fancy it!
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