I've got around £2k to £2.5k for a new road bike...

... what do you recommend?

I've had a Genesis Equilibrium 56cm for the the past 9 to 10 years and generally loved it. The ride is great, ultra smooth but it is time for a change, bits are wearing out and then truth of it is I fancy a change.

I'm 63, 5-10.5" and have around £2-£2.5k to spend. I'm open minded to all materials, they all have there benefits on way or the other.

As I say it is 9 or 10 years since I last bought a bike, I occasionally/casually look what is knocking about but where do YOU think the best bang for buck is in an endurance (leaning towards race) bike at present? Have you seen any good buys?
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Comments

  • shirley_basso
    shirley_basso Posts: 6,195
    You'd be insane to buy new unless your after something particular.

    I'm biased as I have one, but this just went on eBay in your size

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/385534609338
  • s1mples
    s1mples Posts: 63
    edited April 2023
    Yeah I probably agree about not buying new. Though I am wary about buying a used carbon bike, probably as I'm not 100% about how to check one over.

    Your link shows yours as selling 3 days ago!?
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,772
    As mentioned, you'll get much better bang for your buck 2nd hand.

    Personally I'd recommend a Scott Addict (non RC) which is a fairly endurance type geometry.
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • amrushton
    amrushton Posts: 1,305
    Both David Arthur and Durianrider have featured Cannondales recently that cost in the 100s. Had 10 speed Ultegra. Lots of bikes out there. A lot of them prob not ridden much. I couldn't be bothered with electric gears or discs but each to their own. At our age, I'd be thinking compact chainset and/or wide range gears.
  • s1mples
    s1mples Posts: 63
    @amrushton I won't rule anything out but in general I agree with you about electric gears and disc brakes.

    Basically I'm after best bang for buck (as @daniel_b describes it).

    I'm also not sold on tubeless... I'm generally looking old skool, which I am😂 But I could be persuaded otherwise 😀

  • I agree with the 2nd hand comments above. Although for £2.5k you could pick up something like a brand new Fairlight Strael with 105 and a pretty good spec overall. That is if you want a steel bike.
  • Dorset_Boy
    Dorset_Boy Posts: 7,208
    Canyon Endurance CF7 with 105 R7000 is sub £2k new
    Or for £2.9k a CF8 with Ultegra R8000
  • mrb123
    mrb123 Posts: 4,720
    amrushton said:

    Both David Arthur and Durianrider have featured Cannondales recently that cost in the 100s. Had 10 speed Ultegra. Lots of bikes out there. A lot of them prob not ridden much. I couldn't be bothered with electric gears or discs but each to their own. At our age, I'd be thinking compact chainset and/or wide range gears.

    Yeah, if you could find an old style Supersix Evo Hi Mod with Ultegra that would be a great bike, especially with some nice wheels put on it.

    The tyre clearance on the first generation ones was a bit tight but they improved it on the second generation ones that came out around 2017.
  • shirley_basso
    shirley_basso Posts: 6,195
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/115760972752 (maybe you're a 54?)

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/195703950906 (needs new wheels)

    I wouldn't rule out Di2 - it is as good as everyone says it is.
  • rwoofer
    rwoofer Posts: 222
    I have both a Genesis Equilibrium (commuter bike) and a Fairlight Strael (as my 4 season bike). The Fairlight is a good progression from the Equilibrium, just as comfortable, but nippier and more versatile. It can also handle light gravel - mine is
    setup with 35mm gravelking tyres and mudguards.

    I build mine from new for less that £2.5k

  • jdee84
    jdee84 Posts: 287
    You could get a ribble r872 (More endurance geometry than their Endurance named bikes) with 105 Di2 or Mechanical Ultegra for between 2k and 2.5K.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,040

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/115760972752 (maybe you're a 54?)

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/195703950906 (needs new wheels)

    I wouldn't rule out Di2 - it is as good as everyone says it is.

    How do you make either of those bikes stop? Good god man.
  • shirley_basso
    shirley_basso Posts: 6,195
    Using mechanical leverage, you try to crush the crucial structural body of the wheel which is also holding the tyre on, which in turn is providing grip to the road, pressing hard against a wafer thin surface that also wears away the more you brake.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,040
    edited April 2023

    Using mechanical leverage, you try to crush the crucial structural body of the wheel which is also holding the tyre on, which in turn is providing grip to the road, pressing hard against a wafer thin surface that also wears away the more you brake.

    Think it would be much better to transfer opposing circumferentially oriented loads from a central sacrifical frictional engagement element, via radial support structures.
  • shirley_basso
    shirley_basso Posts: 6,195
    from =/= to, surely?

    A few considerations for the prospective buyer to ponder:

    Aesthetics
    Requisite ongoing maintenance
    Displeasing aural omissions
    Additional mass
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,772
    edited April 2023
    daniel_b said:



    Personally I'd recommend a Scott Addict (non RC) which is a fairly endurance type geometry.

    Three addicts for you, all in 54 which I think would be your size.

    Two normal addicts so a bit more endurancey:
    https://ebay.co.uk/itm/155400357375

    And:
    https://ebay.co.uk/itm/175656417303



    And one more racey RC - though I ride one, and am not young and have a dodgy back, there are a fair few spacers available, and it's outrageously comfortable as well as fast.
    https://ebay.co.uk/itm/394532257259

    Note the above has all the spacers in place, and saddle height and bar height is not dissimilar.

    You're the same height as me - what is your actual (Not what you choose for trousers) inside leg measurement?
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,040
    Buying bikes now seems to be a bit like buying cars. Only idiots or very wealthy people buy them new and at full price.
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,772
    Or those who have access to a decent C2W scheme o:)
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • singleton
    singleton Posts: 2,523
    How about titanium?
    Planet-X have some titanium options in your price range, as do Dolan and perhaps others.
  • Tashman
    Tashman Posts: 3,440
    Planet X and Ribble may have something if you want to go down the new route
  • s1mples
    s1mples Posts: 63
    Thanks for the replies and some good food for thought.

    I have a spreadsheet on bike geometry of various frames and it is interesting (and educational). My Genesis Equilibrium will be a good guide as it has been a great fit for me. Tonight's job will be adding some more data:-)

    Thanks again for the useful and thought provoking comments and advice, it is like having a bigger brain!
  • s1mples
    s1mples Posts: 63
    rwoofer said:

    I have both a Genesis Equilibrium (commuter bike) and a Fairlight Strael (as my 4 season bike). The Fairlight is a good progression from the Equilibrium, just as comfortable, but nippier and more versatile. It can also handle light gravel - mine is
    setup with 35mm gravelking tyres and mudguards.

    I build mine from new for less that £2.5k

    I've always loved steel bikes and this does appeal. I've been aware of the Fairlight bikes but never looked at them. They get very well reviewed too.

    On the other hand part of me wants to try another frame material but all options are still open:-)
  • pep.fermi
    pep.fermi Posts: 381
    edited April 2023

    Buying bikes now seems to be a bit like buying cars. Only idiots or very wealthy people buy them new and at full price.

    Absolutely correct!

    Some months ago I bought a hardtail full carbon MTB, Shimano GRX, 26". In theory 10yr old, in reality I could have believed it had never been used.
    Unjustified in my opinion, but since 29" came into play the market for 26" has crashed, so an equivalent bike to the one I bought would have costed almost 5k eur. I paid 280 eur.
  • singleton
    singleton Posts: 2,523

    Buying bikes now seems to be a bit like buying cars. Only idiots or very wealthy people buy them new and at full price.

    Yes, but if the OP is looking to spend £2-£2.5k and keep it for 10 years then I can understand why they might buy new.
    The used market for bikes like this can be hit and miss.
  • Another vote for a Fairlight Strael over here. Enough clearance to throw on a full set of guards through the winter or wider tyres when needed but also buttery smooth, stiff and with a more race orientated geometry.
    Awesome bike.
  • First.Aspect
    First.Aspect Posts: 16,040
    singleton said:

    Buying bikes now seems to be a bit like buying cars. Only idiots or very wealthy people buy them new and at full price.

    Yes, but if the OP is looking to spend £2-£2.5k and keep it for 10 years then I can understand why they might buy new.
    The used market for bikes like this can be hit and miss.
    I think it's possible to determine a pride and joy from a barn find or a car park/roof rack bike.
  • s1mples
    s1mples Posts: 63
    singleton said:

    Buying bikes now seems to be a bit like buying cars. Only idiots or very wealthy people buy them new and at full price.

    Yes, but if the OP is looking to spend £2-£2.5k and keep it for 10 years then I can understand why they might buy new.
    The used market for bikes like this can be hit and miss.</blockquote

    I often buy secondhand, I've just picked up a Taylor acoustic guitar secondhand, less than half price new and am very happy with it.

    Now bikes, I know there will be some outstanding buys if you get it right, I know you that people are quite happy to hand over decent amounts of money for bikes but then realise you have to pedal them!

    My concern (especially with carbon bikes) is how they have looked after them.

    I definitely haven't ruled out secondhand but with new you know exactly where you stand. I know how I've looked after mine and nearly ten years on it is still good on a lot of original components. With that in mind I agree with your general comment @singleton
  • mrb123
    mrb123 Posts: 4,720
    Looking at Gumtree there are some lovely bikes to be had. Good job I need a big size otherwise I could easily spend a lot of money. If you're a 54 or 56 the possibilities seem almost endless.