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The apostrophe, please read

The apostrophe has two functions: it marks possession, and it is used in contractions to indicate the place where the letters have been omitted.

That's it
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Posts

  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,161
    There are three a's in your name.
  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,121

    The apostrophe has two functions: it marks possession, and it is used in contractions to indicate the place where the letters have been omitted.

    That's it

    aren't you missing a full stop after "it"?

  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,028
    There are few things more fun than someone quoting an absolute rule.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,351
    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,161

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries

    Bit of a glasshouse when it comes to punctuation.
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,028

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,351
    I had to learn English when I was already in my late teens and I don't think I've ever put an apostrophe wrong.
    Most people here are native speakers and educated to A levels or beyond, so I don't understand what is so hard about getting apostrophes right...

    As per rule above, it is really very simple... almost like scoring a penalty...
  • JezyboyJezyboy Posts: 794
    Thank's for the tip's, its something I havent thought about to much.
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,144
    I think we should adopt the ancient Greek inscription approach:

    NOSPACESBETWEENWORDSNOPUNCTUATIONNOUPPERANDLOWERCASRJUSTASTREAMOFCAPITALLETTERS
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,351
    edited 16 July
    There's a Portuguese novelist... what's his name... Saramago! He doesn't use punctuation
    Not that I expect anyone on here to have read anything other than Harry Potter... ;)
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 2,386
    Jezyboy said:

    Thank's for the tip's, its something I havent thought about to much.

    Me to,
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,144
    Or Latin:

    SOME.PUNC.B.L.ABBR.
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 24,325 Lives Here

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
  • ProssPross Posts: 28,258

    The apostrophe has two functions: it marks possession, and it is used in contractions to indicate the place where the letters have been omitted.

    That's it

    Are you sure there should be a comma before the word "and"?
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,822

    There's a Portuguese novelist... what's his name... Saramago! He doesn't use punctuation
    Not that I expect anyone on here to have read anything other than Harry Potter... ;)

    I’ve not read Harry Potter.
    Missing anything? 😉
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,028
    Pross said:

    The apostrophe has two functions: it marks possession, and it is used in contractions to indicate the place where the letters have been omitted.

    That's it

    Are you sure there should be a comma before the word "and"?

    Apostrophes are indicated where it can help quick comprehension: in this case, it (correctly) indicates the beginning of a new clause, and not something connected with 'possession'. Or you could just view it as an Oxford/serial comma, in which case it's equally correct.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,351
    Pross said:

    The apostrophe has two functions: it marks possession, and it is used in contractions to indicate the place where the letters have been omitted.

    That's it

    Are you sure there should be a comma before the word "and"?
    I copied and pasted that bit from the online dictionary, so talk to them... ;)
  • TheBigBeanTheBigBean Posts: 13,161
    pblakeney said:

    There's a Portuguese novelist... what's his name... Saramago! He doesn't use punctuation
    Not that I expect anyone on here to have read anything other than Harry Potter... ;)

    I’ve not read Harry Potter.
    Missing anything? 😉
    Decent enough yarn.
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,566

    I had to learn English when I was already in my late teens and I don't think I've ever put an apostrophe wrong.
    Most people here are native speakers and educated to A levels or beyond, so I don't understand what is so hard about getting apostrophes right...

    As per rule above, it is really very simple... almost like scoring a penalty...

    We're a nation of shop keepers (apparently). Blame it on the Grocers. :)



    The older I get, the better I was.

  • briantrumpetbriantrumpet Posts: 7,028
    Incidentally, punctuation was initially introduced to indicate the space in between words when speaking (at a time when most information would have been disseminated by the educated people who could read, and were like musical rests: a comma was one beat, a point (full stop) two beats, and a colon four beats, like crotchet, minim, semibreve rests. It was only in the late 16th century that they took on more formal grammatical purposes.

    https://research-repository.st-andrews.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/10023/19905/Rhodes_2019_HLQ_Punctuation_VoR.pdf

    Read David Crystal's 'Making A Point' if punctuation interests you... it's a brilliant book.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 6,699
    This is the thread for people who find macroeconomics a bit too racy.
  • womackwomack Posts: 366
    edited 16 July

    I had to learn English when I was already in my late teens and I don't think I've ever put an apostrophe wrong.
    Most people here are native speakers and educated to A levels or beyond, so I don't understand what is so hard about getting apostrophes right..

    Like you I didn't really speak and definitely not write English until leaving school.

    Unlike you I have no clue where to put an apostrophe and to be honest I couldn't give a monkeys'.


  • MattFalleMattFalle Posts: 5,121

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
    you try living with a language that has 6 letters.....
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 6,699
    MattFalle said:

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
    you try living with a language that has 6 letters.....
    Don't the waving arms each count for at least another 3 letters each?
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 24,325 Lives Here

    MattFalle said:

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
    you try living with a language that has 6 letters.....
    Don't the waving arms each count for at least another 3 letters each?
    I thought he was referring to Welsh, 6 letters and words that are 172 letters long.
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 6,699

    MattFalle said:

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
    you try living with a language that has 6 letters.....
    Don't the waving arms each count for at least another 3 letters each?
    I thought he was referring to Welsh, 6 letters and words that are 172 letters long.
    Oh. I'll blame that on it being gin o'clock at the time I sent it.
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 26,351

    MattFalle said:

    the use of apostrophes is getting out of control... it seems that people can't stop themselves from sticking them everywhere, so I thought appropriate to set boundaries


    The French are just as bad. Some of them seem to think that my name is Brian's.

    Mind you, one of the one in English that does annoy me is "panini's". Wrong on more than one level.
    As an Italian Englishman, or an English Italian, it irritate's the phuck out of me.
    you try living with a language that has 6 letters.....
    Don't the waving arms each count for at least another 3 letters each?
    I thought he was referring to Welsh, 6 letters and words that are 172 letters long.
    Oh. I'll blame that on it being gin o'clock at the time I sent it.
    Question about English: in "o'clock", what's the apostrophe replacing? Would it be "on the clock" or what?
  • First.AspectFirst.Aspect Posts: 6,699
    Of, I think.
  • ProssPross Posts: 28,258
    "Of the" I believe.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,540
    Its as a possesive shurly should be it's

    If the language itself is so inconsistent, why bother getting it right?
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