Running?

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Comments

  • Chaz.Harding
    Chaz.Harding Posts: 3,144
    webboo said:

    So someone flagged me for suggesting that riding 30 miles in 90 minutes is abuse. Excuse me but I thought this was a cycling forum.

    So? Why are you bothered?! :D

    Someone was obviously quite sensitive.

    I suppose it depends where you live, but maintaining a >20mph average for 90 minutes, for me, riding in my local area, would be difficult.
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  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    webboo said:

    So someone flagged me for suggesting that riding 30 miles in 90 minutes is abuse. Excuse me but I thought this was a cycling forum.

    How odd. I would average that speed on a training ride but not on a social one. But why would it be classified as abuse to suggest it? Did they think you were trolling perhaps? Social media can be such a nuisance as much of the nuance is lost and too much inference made.

  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    I was mulling this over and realised the very important thing not mentioned is the associated difference in psoas engagement as a runner. It doesn’t take much to recognise that the hip flexors are a key factor in running and having strong mobile hip flexors along with glutes and hamstrings that engage effectively is crucial. I think I might encourage any new running clients who are cyclists to focus on hip opening sequences and generally mobilise key areas eg prime the glutes and warm up the ankle joints and calf area to prepare for the impact before a run. Chances are they’re fairly dormant from riding and this could be the difference between including running as an added high impact boost to fitness or route to injury.
  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    Gosh, this slow realisation goes on. Another really important consideration is feet. In cycling your feet are tightly encased in shoes that remain rigidly attached to pedals. The worst thing as a runner is to have poor foot flexibility/mobility and strength. My running shoes allow ample toe splay so my feet can work freely. You run the risk of injury through not addressing the foundations from the minute you start and, also, could compromise your cycling (with damaged feet). Heidi Jones is an ex-international athlete and great podiatrist who works in Sydney and encourages these exercises that work on developing proprioception and strength. Do these religiously and you will be well placed to start running :)
  • MattFalle
    MattFalle Posts: 11,644
    Running isshyte. It'll smash your knees to bits. Its also very boring.

    Don't do it. Ride your bike instead or eat 'scratchings and drink ale.
    .
    The camera down the willy isn't anything like as bad as it sounds.
  • andyrr
    andyrr Posts: 1,816
    MattFalle said:

    Running isshyte. It'll smash your knees to bits. Its also very boring.

    Don't do it. Ride your bike instead or eat 'scratchings and drink ale.

    You do talksomeshyte sometimes.
    I've regarded myself as a cyclist who runs even when I was running more often than I cycled. Thankfully I 'm now back to cycling more than I run but I still run every day and never yet, since I took to running about 8 years ago, have I suffered knee pain. Shin pain yes, when I started out, but that was likely due to not graduating my running pace and time. Hard to say whether running helped my riding but when I was time poor I found 20 - 60 minute runs a useful means of maintaining cardio fitness and endurance. If was limited to just 1 bike ride a week then a few runs squeezed in would be what I'd do to keep my exercise regular as I love doing that and the cardio benefits may well help the cycling. An alternative is turbo training - significant "bang for your buck" if you would prefer doing that as opposed to running.
  • MrsR
    MrsR Posts: 81
    I'm afraid the "running ruins your knees" line has no evidence whatsoever apart from anecdotal (although appreciate that often forums and those who enjoy them thrive on anecdotes). If someone came to me complaining about their knees, this would indicate to me they are running incorrectly and I would look at working on their form and structural weaknesses. Running is actually correlated with a lower incidence of hip and knee arthritis in helping to keep body weight down and stimulate cartilage growth.
  • elbowloh
    elbowloh Posts: 7,078
    Anecdotally, I used to run a bit, but gave up because it caused havoc on my knees
    I didn't love running enough to look into the mechanics of it, I just took up cycling and never looked back. I found I enjoyed it a lot more. It helped me as I could actually cycle to destinations (seaside/beauty spots etc) so my rides had more to it than just for exercise. Yesz you could cycle to a destination (I also used to sometimes run across London from Victoria station to work at Paddington (at the time), but the increased range that cycling have opened up more places to visit).
    I also found cycling more social when I wanted to ride with friends.
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