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Performance plateau?

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  • webboo said:

    How would you know.

    Decades of time and hundreds of thousands of miles on a bike. It’s a little thing called ‘experience’.
  • If you find yourself plateauing, spend more time in the pain cave. No pain no gain.


    Can you not just keep your ignorant rambling to yourself?
    “Ignorant ramblings”. Okay, even a simple google search will bring up lots of hits, all repeating ( pretty much ) what I just said.

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,277

    If you find yourself plateauing, spend more time in the pain cave. No pain no gain.


    Can you not just keep your ignorant rambling to yourself?
    “Ignorant ramblings”. Okay, even a simple google search will bring up lots of hits, all repeating ( pretty much ) what I just said.

    Nick, you're clearly mentally ill, borderline paranoid delusional I would guess. Go away and get some help.
  • brundonbianchibrundonbianchi Posts: 689
    edited August 2020



    Nick, you're clearly mentally ill, borderline paranoid delusional I would guess. Go away and get some help.









    Oh really. Well there’s a whole lot of pictures that say otherwise. Heck, I was even the ‘poster boy’ for my chosen charity in the PRLS a couple of years back. The other photos include the rides I lead for a local charity. Up to and including a 250 mile effort a couple of years back, like I’ve said. I’m well known. And very easy to find / verify. I’m the guy with the pink socks / green leaders jersey, aero lid etc. In case you needed clarification.



  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,277
    Not sure how any of that is relevant. If anything, it just demonstrates that you're a bit of desperate, tragic individual. But we already knew that from your previous 10 usernames. Like I say, you need help...
  • Not sure how any of that is relevant. If anything, it just demonstrates that you're a bit of desperate, tragic individual. But we already knew that from your previous 10 usernames. Like I say, you need help...

    It proves I am who I say I am, with evidence. It’s your turn now I reckon.

  • cruffcruff Posts: 1,518
    edited August 2020
    Fcuks sake, is this tool back again? Even a complete forum redesign can't get rid of him.

    Anyway, OP - ignore anything rhe troll says - what he knows about cycling can be written on the back of a postage stamp with a magic marker.

    Because you don't have a lot of time on the bike, generally you'll get your best bang for your buck by doing intervals, over-unders and some sprints, but putting an easy day in as well. If you can commit to riding four times a week, with two of those sessions being hard efforts, one being a longer base ride and the other being some active recovery, you can improve - you just need to be realistic about what you can 'achieve' off that amount of training.

    I'd say something like:
    Monday - rest
    Tuesday - over-unders
    Wednesday - recovery ride
    Thursday - VO2 max/tabatas
    Friday - rest
    Saturday - long base ride
    Sunday - rest/another base ride if you can sneak it in

    Do that over three weeks, gradually increasing the effort/reps on the hard sessions, slightly longer base ride each week - then on week four, knock the over-unders on the head and replace with an extra recovery ride, replace the VO2Max session with a steady 2x20 tempo and do half the distance on the base ride

    Repeat this cycle twice, then test in week 8 (second rest week)
    Fat chopper. Some racing. Some testing. Some crashing.
    Specialising in Git Daaahns and Cafs. Norvern Munkey/Transplanted Laaandoner.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,277

    Not sure how any of that is relevant. If anything, it just demonstrates that you're a bit of desperate, tragic individual. But we already knew that from your previous 10 usernames. Like I say, you need help...

    It proves I am who I say I am, with evidence. It’s your turn now I reckon.

    Narcissist says what..?
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,599

    Not sure how any of that is relevant. If anything, it just demonstrates that you're a bit of desperate, tragic individual. But we already knew that from your previous 10 usernames. Like I say, you need help...

    It proves I am who I say I am, with evidence. It’s your turn now I reckon.

    How does showing some pictures of yourself with some rotund cyclists on a charity ride prove your credibility to be able to advise on improving ones performance.
  • cruffcruff Posts: 1,518
    webboo said:

    Not sure how any of that is relevant. If anything, it just demonstrates that you're a bit of desperate, tragic individual. But we already knew that from your previous 10 usernames. Like I say, you need help...

    It proves I am who I say I am, with evidence. It’s your turn now I reckon.

    How does showing some pictures of yourself with some rotund cyclists on a charity ride prove your credibility to be able to advise on improving ones performance.
    Especially considering he improved his RideLondon time by a whopping ten minutes between 2018 and 2019... To a shitty 5:10 or something 🙄

    Melt
    Fat chopper. Some racing. Some testing. Some crashing.
    Specialising in Git Daaahns and Cafs. Norvern Munkey/Transplanted Laaandoner.
  • webboo said:



    How does showing some pictures of yourself with some rotund cyclists on a charity ride prove your credibility to be able to advise on improving ones performance.

    Well seeing as you asked, you can only work with what you’re given. A lot of those guys ( and they were a great bunch ) were previously very much 30 miles a week, maybe the odd organised outing types. I had them all averaging reasonable clubby levels of performance, just by little nudges here and there. The feedback was ( mostly ) positive, they enjoyed it, that’s the main thing. So by my reckoning, I’m well placed to advise on this subject, because the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

  • brundonbianchibrundonbianchi Posts: 689
    edited August 2020
    cruff said:


    Especially considering he improved his RideLondon time by a whopping ten minutes between 2018 and 2019... To a shitty 5:10 or something 🙄

    Melt

    As anyone who’s ever done the PRLS 100 will tell you, it can be a nightmare, if you’re not away in the first couple of waves. That’s the nature of the beast. When push comes to shove, it’s a bloody ‘sportive’ at the end of the day, with all that entails.

  • brundonbianchibrundonbianchi Posts: 689
    edited August 2020
    cruff said:

    Fcuks sake, is this tool back again? Even a complete forum redesign can't get rid of him.

    Anyway, OP - ignore anything rhe troll says - what he knows about cycling can be written on the back of a postage stamp with a magic marker.

    Because you don't have a lot of time on the bike, generally you'll get your best bang for your buck by doing intervals, over-unders and some sprints, but putting an easy day in as well. If you can commit to riding four times a week, with two of those sessions being hard efforts, one being a longer base ride and the other being some active recovery, you can improve - you just need to be realistic about what you can 'achieve' off that amount of training.

    I'd say something like:
    Monday - rest
    Tuesday - over-unders
    Wednesday - recovery ride
    Thursday - VO2 max/tabatas
    Friday - rest
    Saturday - long base ride
    Sunday - rest/another base ride if you can sneak it in

    Do that over three weeks, gradually increasing the effort/reps on the hard sessions, slightly longer base ride each week - then on week four, knock the over-unders on the head and replace with an extra recovery ride, replace the VO2Max session with a steady 2x20 tempo and do half the distance on the base ride

    Repeat this cycle twice, then test in week 8 (second rest week)

    O.P. If you’re want to “ignore” anything, this is a great place to start. “Cruff” doesn’t know you, or your bike, or where you ride, bleating our the same trope ridden censored won’t necessarily help you, it may even be counter productive. If I were you, I’d look at training plans from www.britishcycling.org.uk.

    And choose one that suits you. They are put together by actual experts, and are worth a look.

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,277

    webboo said:



    How does showing some pictures of yourself with some rotund cyclists on a charity ride prove your credibility to be able to advise on improving ones performance.

    Well seeing as you asked, you can only work with what you’re given. A lot of those guys ( and they were a great bunch ) were previously very much 30 miles a week, maybe the odd organised outing types. I had them all averaging reasonable clubby levels of performance, just by little nudges here and there. The feedback was ( mostly ) positive, they enjoyed it, that’s the main thing. So by my reckoning, I’m well placed to advise on this subject, because the proof of the pudding is in the eating.

    You weren't coaching them Nick. You took them on a few bike rides. You are not, and never have been (and probably never will be) licensed as a cycling coach. I doubt if you'd pass the DBS checks..

    These are circular arguments that we have all had with your previous 10 usernames. It's just embarrassing to see you trot out all the same old drivel and utter garbage yet again, as though it was the first time...
  • cruff said:

    Fcuks sake, is this tool back again? Even a complete forum redesign can't get rid of him.

    Anyway, OP - ignore anything rhe troll says - what he knows about cycling can be written on the back of a postage stamp with a magic marker.

    Because you don't have a lot of time on the bike, generally you'll get your best bang for your buck by doing intervals, over-unders and some sprints, but putting an easy day in as well. If you can commit to riding four times a week, with two of those sessions being hard efforts, one being a longer base ride and the other being some active recovery, you can improve - you just need to be realistic about what you can 'achieve' off that amount of training.

    I'd say something like:
    Monday - rest
    Tuesday - over-unders
    Wednesday - recovery ride
    Thursday - VO2 max/tabatas
    Friday - rest
    Saturday - long base ride
    Sunday - rest/another base ride if you can sneak it in

    Do that over three weeks, gradually increasing the effort/reps on the hard sessions, slightly longer base ride each week - then on week four, knock the over-unders on the head and replace with an extra recovery ride, replace the VO2Max session with a steady 2x20 tempo and do half the distance on the base ride

    Repeat this cycle twice, then test in week 8 (second rest week)

    O.P. If anything needs ignoring, it’s this post. “Cruff” doesn’t know you, how you ride, or anything else, so putting a load of trope riddled generic garbage isn’t going to help, it may even hinder you.
    My advice would be to look at www.britishcycling.org.uk
    and choose a training plan on there, which are put together by actual experts.

    https://www.britishcycling.org.uk/knowledge

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,277


    O.P. If anything needs ignoring, it’s this post. “Cruff” doesn’t know you, how you ride, or anything else, so putting a load of trope riddled generic garbage isn’t going to help, it may even hinder you.
    My advice would be to look at www.britishcycling.org.uk
    and choose a training plan on there, which are put together by actual experts.

    So how exactly does your earlier idiotic idea of 'spending more time in the pain cave' (ffs) improve on things, when you don't know the OP either..?

  • cruffcruff Posts: 1,518
    edited August 2020

    cruff said:


    Especially considering he improved his RideLondon time by a whopping ten minutes between 2018 and 2019... To a shitty 5:10 or something 🙄

    Melt

    As anyone who’s ever done the PRLS 100 will tell you, it can be a nightmare, if you’re not away in the first couple of waves. That’s the nature of the beast. When push comes to shove, it’s a bloody ‘sportive’ at the end of the day, with all that entails.

    Not sure why you deleted your other post, quoted below, but 'cruff' doesn't need to know a rider to develop a basic plan for them. 'Cruff' has - unlike you - trained dozens of riders, from Sportive riders and 4th - 1st cat racers to those recovering from triple bypasses and young riders hoping to turn pro. You don't need to know a rider to give them a basic plan that is rooted in tried and tested scientific training principles - something you, with your constant stream of utter bollocks know nothing about

    For instance - to take just one pearl of wisdom you've imparted on this thread - how does buying a new bike improve your normalised power? Explain that - I'll wait.

    OP - for info, this poster has been a constant pest in this forum under various names for years. There are lots of people who will give you good, helpful advice. This bloke is a long-standing troll who gets his kicks out of talking sh1te and winding people up
    Fat chopper. Some racing. Some testing. Some crashing.
    Specialising in Git Daaahns and Cafs. Norvern Munkey/Transplanted Laaandoner.
  • zest28zest28 Posts: 359
    I’d say best is to get a coach.
  • davep1davep1 Posts: 802
    I was trying for 10k km this year, I've regularly done 8 or 8.5, so I didn't think it was a massive jump. However, you have to average 30km a day, and I really struggle with that. One long ride at the weekend, or 3 days commuting in a row, and I want at least 2 days off, sometimes 4. If you go on holiday for a fortnight with no riding, or the weather is lousy for a week, it is almost impossible to get the distance back on track.
    For me, recovery is important, but the only way I can judge it is on how I feel. Some weeks I can do 2 or 3 hard rides, some one is a struggle.

    I find interval training helps. A typical week for me is commute 2 or 3 days, so that is an hour each way, 4 or 6 times a week, plus a longer ride at the weekend, probably 10-15 hours a week. As it's a longer ride, the weekend ride is normally endurance z2 pace, or maybe z3 tempo. I will try an interval session on one of the rides in to work during the week, usually a few days before or after the weekend, and all the other commutes are easier, maybe one will be z3. I find I really have to force myself to take it easy though.

    I've settled into one interval a week, for 3 weeks, then the 4th I don't do anything specific but it might have a hard ride, it might not. Intervals can be hill repeats - I live near Steyning Bostal which takes about 8 minutes to climb, 6 reps. Or I do 40/20 second sprints - sprint as hard as I can for 40 seconds, roll for 20 seconds, repeat 10 times, 10 mins easy pedaling, repeat. Or I might do threshold under/overs, 6 minutes just under threshold, 3 minutes just over, 10 minutes easy pedalling, repeat. You can set these intervals up on your Garmin, it gives a countdown beep before each interval, a short description on screen so if you lose track if you're on an interval or resting you can see it. I do these sessions out in the country, but I do back off at junctions or if there is something going on up the road, you have to be aware of what is going on.

    I agree with what Bob says, it is very easy to slip into that pattern of going quite hard so you are never really fresh but you do it so often you don't get much of a benefit, particularly if you are commuting. I think you have to mix it up to see noticeable improvements. Sure, if you can double the hours you spend a week on a bike that will help, but if you are stuck with the same available time, you have to try and do something different.
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