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Multitools

fiverearsfiverears Posts: 38
I am a returning cyclist, I have bought a via nirone 7 last summer and only been round town on it.
I am worried about going any further due to getting a puncture.
I am also a one man band.
basically this puncture worry is stopping me from getting out there so I ask you
what to carry in my jersey pocket and what multitool to buy?
tia

Posts

  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 679
    All of the above. I have a pair of disposable gloves too after caking my hands, bottle, grip tape and phone in oil.
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 7,314
    Just to add to the above. Rather than stuffing that lot into a jersey pocket get a small saddle pack to put them in.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • fiverearsfiverears Posts: 38
    thx for the replies
  • arlowoodarlowood Posts: 2,379
    Once you've got all the relevant kit, I would advise having a dry run at replacing an inner tube on the rear wheel in the comfort of your garage or somewhere at home.
    Nothing like being familiar with the required technique to ease any anxieties about puncturing out on the road.
    Rear wheel is best as it's a bit more of a faff to remove and refit due to the derailleur
  • ibr17xviiibr17xvii Posts: 284
    Hexus X is excellent.
  • fiverearsfiverears Posts: 38
    arlowood said:

    Once you've got all the relevant kit, I would advise having a dry run at replacing an inner tube on the rear wheel in the comfort of your garage or somewhere at home.
    Nothing like being familiar with the required technique to ease any anxieties about puncturing out on the road.
    Rear wheel is best as it's a bit more of a faff to remove and refit due to the derailleur

    yes I was thinking of doing this, like a couple of times just to get used to it
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 11,046
    edited 12 March
    fiverears said:

    arlowood said:

    Once you've got all the relevant kit, I would advise having a dry run at replacing an inner tube on the rear wheel in the comfort of your garage or somewhere at home.
    Nothing like being familiar with the required technique to ease any anxieties about puncturing out on the road.
    Rear wheel is best as it's a bit more of a faff to remove and refit due to the derailleur

    yes I was thinking of doing this, like a couple of times just to get used to it
    It also breaks new tyres in making getting the tyre off easier if you happen to have a difficult combination of rim and tyre. I've had some combinations which are very easy, and some that are very difficult.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • focuszing723focuszing723 Posts: 679
    Yes, that's a good one.

    I had a flat on both wheels once on my MTB. I was riding on a lane after the farmers had finished tractor trimming the hedgerows. I turn back if I see signs of this now and use a different route. Give it a week with rain to try the road again.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,157
    I swear by separate bits of kit. Allen Keys. Chain breaker. Small flat screwdriver and you're sorted. Some multi tools are so bulky that you cant get them into spaces to tighten stuff.
  • photonic69photonic69 Posts: 994
    fenix said:

    Some multi tools are so bulky that you cant get them into spaces to tighten stuff.

    True - some are obscenely bulky. The Hexus X is just about right and as it incorporates a chain tool it was a good balance of convenience and heft. Believe me, I took about 6 months researching tools before I bought one. There has only been once incidence I have experienced of a bulky multi tool (not mine) not fitting and that was on a seat post bolt that had a wedge adjuster. My Hexus fit though.

  • faster97faster97 Posts: 33
    I only carry an innertube, a CO2 cartridge and head, one of those tiny park tools instant patch kits (about the size of a postage stamp), a tenner (polymer notes make the best tyre boots) and a VAR tyre lever.

    I don't usually carry the tyre lever as I can usually manage without, but for the rims I'm using at the moment, it's the only thing I can get the tyres on or off with - normal tyre levers are no use!

    Other than the tyre lever, it all fits into one of the little resealable plastic pouches that small 'LIfeline' branded parts are sent out in. No need for a saddle bag - fits nicely into a jersey pocket.



    I know they don't weigh much, but for most rides, even long ones, I don't see the need to carry tools on a well maintained bike. Failures are so rare.

    If I'm going touring for multiple days, I take an absolute shed load of stuff. I think it depends on how much you trust your bike! The one I use for that sort of stuff isn't so well maintained.
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