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Tube in tubless

Im new to tubeless and have bought a bike already set up tubeless
If I get a puncture that doesn’t seal itself , in a emergency would I be able to fit a inner tube to get me home ?
I would have a spare tube with me as my son has same size wheels and isn’t tubeless .

Also any advice on which sealant to have with me if I get a puncture in mine and try to fix by adding a bit of sealant .

Sorry for basic q’s but learning here guys and gals .
Cheers

Posts

  • billycoolbillycool Posts: 833
    Hiya,

    If your bike is set up tubeless it should already have tyre sealant in it. Not real point carrying spare sealant, as if what's in the tyre won't seal it, extra sealant won't help. It just gets really messy!

    Sealant can need changing/topping up over time, otherwise it might let you down then you most need it. Some suggest checking it every 6 months. I can't give a specific timeline though.

    Carry a spare tube? Yes - absolutley. It can be a life saver for you (and others). Just be aware that a tubeless tyre can easily pick up thorns over time, seal itself and you hardly notice (might need to top up air). If you do an emergency trailside repair and plan to fit a tube, check the WHOLE tyre for thorns, not just the bit you are fixing. My mates record for thorns is his tubeless tyre was 12. Otherwise you'll ruin your tube as soon as you blow it up.

    Tubeless tyres can sit quite tight on the rim, so decent (strong) tyre levers are needed and a sensible pump. The use of a tube would suggest a possible split in your tyre and a tyre boot/patch is always useful to have. The tube might squdge out through the split and fail (think of a hernia), so the boot just helps keep the tube in the tyre. A good emergency patch is an empty energy gel satchet. Did that for a bloke in Afan a few years ago and he was very grateful that he could at least ride to the bottom on the trail rathar than walking.

    Tubeless is great and pretty low maintainence but a spare tube is well worth carrying.

    "Ride, crash, replace"
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 8,356
    Make sure you have a tool to remove your valve so you can fit a tube as a last resort. Tyre worms or stans. See website info.
    https://thecycleclinic.co.uk/pages/tech-page
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • The tyre is also full of sealant, so it's handy to have something to mop it up with when you take it off to put a tube in.
  • steve_sordysteve_sordy Posts: 2,025
    A quick and safe way to check for thorns poking through on the inside of the tyre is to drag a paper tissue through the tyre. If anything snags, it will be a thorn. Much better than receiving a cut or puncture to the finger tips!

    If I get a flat, it is not always due to a puncture, it may have been caused by a tyre burp. This is when the stress on the tyre has been such that the bead momentarily loses its grip on the rim and spills some or all of the air pressure. You may see evidence in the form of spilled sealant on the rim and tyre. In which case simply pump it back up. But if you have a puncture or a split, then it's inner tube time! Previous posts have provided good info. The hardest thing may be to remove the tubeless valve. The worst thing will be dealing with the spilled sealant on your hands as it dries sticky! :( I keep a pair of latex gloves in my pack for such occasions. They also come in handy for dealing with the oily bits.

    Before each ride, I check my air pressure with a digital tyre pressure gauge (see Topeak D2). For months after first adding sealant the pressure hardly alters. But as the sealant dries out and the number of punctures starts to increase, then slowly the pressure loss between rides starts to increase. You decide when it is time to top up the sealant. My record for punctures is over two dozen in each tyre! (As witnessed by the damp spots, or the small green spot, depending upon sealant type).
  • billycool said:


    …Just be aware that a tubeless tyre can easily pick up thorns over time, seal itself and you hardly notice (might need to top up air). If you do an emergency trailside repair and plan to fit a tube, check the WHOLE tyre for thorns, not just the bit you are fixing. My mates record for thorns is his tubeless tyre was 12. Otherwise you'll ruin your tube as soon as you blow it up.

    Excellent point and so obvious now you’ve pointed it out! That’s potentially saved me a miserable long walk home – cheers!

    A quick and safe way to check for thorns poking through on the inside of the tyre is to drag a paper tissue through the tyre. If anything snags, it will be a thorn. Much better than receiving a cut or puncture to the finger tips!

    Good idea that, it’ll help clean the sealant up too

    I'm learning all the time :)

  • noste500noste500 Posts: 90
    Thanks !!👍
  • thecycleclinicthecycleclinic Posts: 348
    Use a tyre plug. Better still use an insert it make puncture less likely die to.lower pressure and more likely to seal. Also tyres cant unseat witha good insert. Being biased or perhaps I ha e the pick of everything I use Pepi tyre noodles. Inserts are misunderstood and the right ones improve grip, traction, increase impact resistance and comfort. They allow the same spring rate with lower tyre pressures. Many Inserts however are too big and leave a low air volume so they mostly do impact resistance without the ability to fine tune the spring rate of the tyre through air pressure as there is not enough air there to play with.

    Use an insert. You even get run flat potential.
    www.thecycleclinic.co.uk
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