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glasses v contacts

staitukstaituk Posts: 37
edited July 2019 in Road general
HI i and looking for some cycling glasses, but i wear glasses, can you get cycling sunglasses wear you can fit lenses in to or do people wear contacts?

thanks
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Posts

  • monkimarkmonkimark Posts: 736
    I use contacts a lot of the time. I also have a couple of pairs of prescription safety glasses that I use for cycling.

    The first set I got have 3 lenses (smoke, clear and yellow) with Rx (prescrption) inserts that can be switched between them. They're ok but a bit bulky and difficult to keep clean/unfogged.

    The second pair are direct glazed prescription and i got reactive lenses that turn dark in bright sunshine. They were a bit pricey £150 ish from memory but I got them through work.

    I think I got both from here https://www.safetyspecs.co.uk/?gclid=Cj ... X-EALw_wcB
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,723
    I do the same as Mark, have two pairs of glasses with RX inserts. Myself I don'd find them bulky but its all personal preference. Think I paid £100 for the main pair that had five lenses (clear, yellow, blue, mirror and black polarised). Other pair is some Oakley Jawbreakers with RX inserts.

    Only use contacts occasionally mainly down to cost and ease of use.
  • schlepcyclingschlepcycling Posts: 1,561
    I have a pair of prescription photochromic cycling glasses from here https://www.optilabs.com/product-category/sport/cycling-sunglasses/ they do both prescription inserts and prescription lenses.
    'Hello to Jason Isaacs'
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,158
    I'm long sighted so struggle seeing the computer. I've tried the BBB glasses with a thin strip at the bottom to allow me to read the screen, but the protection from the sun with them is poor. I've just gone down the contact lens route and wear my standard Salice cycling glasses. Far easier.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • peatpeat Posts: 1,243
    Both.

    I have a set of prescription riding glasses that I use for shorter rides (instead of wasting a set of lenses) and rides longer than 15hrs where contacts would become too uncomfortable.

    I don't like my glasses particually. They look really naff and the insert is so curved that it messes with depth perception a bit, making it feel like you're going really slowly all the time. They have interchangeable lenses for different light conditions. But, it's a bit of a fiddle and i'm usually doing it while knackered at the side of the road, so they get dropped and scratched. Also, if its foggy or drizzling, both sets of lenses get covered in water droplets making them useless.

    I would love a set of prescription photochromics, but they are a bit too rich for me.
  • Oakleys with the RX prescription inserts for me as well. They are expensive but as they get used nearly every day of the year they have been well worth it.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,220
    edited June 2019
    I'm on continual wear monthly disposable contacts now. Fine to wear 24 hours a day - only removing them once a month to throw away and use a new pair. If you do need to take them out early, you can use a contact lens storage case like the old style lenses, and reuse them later.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,220
    Just saw these too. Not the most attractive, but a cheap option (comparatively):

    https://www.ekoi.com/en/cycling-glasses ... 50009.html
  • peatpeat Posts: 1,243
    I tried continual a few years ago but still found I wanted to scratch my eyes out after 14/15hrs. I was given eyedrops, but they only offered relief for 15mins or so.

    Not for me.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,861
    If you only need readers to see your Garmin I can recommend Hydrotac stick on lenses. You simply wet them, position them on the inside of your sunglasses lenses and they stick. Means you can wear any style/ brand of sunglasses and still read your computer when you look down!

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hydrotac-Stick-On-Bifocal-Lenses-1-50/dp/B00IF9375I/ref=asc_df_B00IF9375I/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=310512857178&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13493584844750532534&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=t&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006648&hvtargid=pla-434636211514&psc=1

    PP
  • alanyualanyu Posts: 73
    e72c708da97739126c97b8f0f6198618377ae299.jpg

    Oakley Jawbreaker and Rudy Rydon, both are prescription lens. The lens were custom made in China.
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,314
    I'd recommend contacts if you can get on with them. I've been a contact lens wearer for years, and would never go back to glasses. For me it's the versatility of them, and it means you can wear any sunglasses you want to wear, plus you have good vision for 100% of your field of sight, rather than have blurred 'edges' beyond the rim of your specs.

    Also, I tend to find when there is rain then it's good to be able to take glasses off if they are becoming difficult to see through (although a cap with the peak turned down helps).

    I do a fair bit of swimming and running (and sometimes all three in one event!), so not having to have prescription goggles is also important, given the styles of prescription goggles is very limited.

    Maybe a trial of daily lenses might be good, just to see if you can get on with them - you wouldn't have to wear them all day - just when you go out riding.
  • chippykchippyk Posts: 529
    I almost always use contacts for cycling and for long weekend runs. If it’s raining when running I can take my glasses off but also when I’m on my bike, especially on the drops, I find myself looking over the top of my prescription glasses and I can’t see properly. I always cycle with a cap under my helmet but sunglasses also seem better in the rain than my normal glasses.

    I’ll add in that in the event of a crash, even a pair of Oakleys are cheaper than most good quality varifocal glasses
  • handfulhandful Posts: 914
    I wear daily contacts as above but I generally only use in one eye for cycling. This is due to me experiencing them causing issues on a long fast descent. They dry out with the wind and start to affect my vision so it's good to be able to see out of my good eye! I find that it falls out so usually carry a spare!

    I can read my garmin fine with a single lens so no issues for me there.

    In normal life contacts were completely liberating and i would highly recommend them.
    Vaaru Titanium Sram eTap HRD
    Kuota Kharma Evo Rival 22 - fair weather
    Moda Chord with drop bars and Rival shifters - foul weather
    Intense Spider 29er - mud
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,018
    I’m a glasses wearer but ride using disposable contacts. Same as the others above, one of the key benefits is being able to garage the sunglasses on climbs and when it’s raining because no matter what brand your wearing THEY WILL FOG UP.

    Tried RX inserts and IMO they’re a joke.
  • There's no business like show business.
  • dannbodgedannbodge Posts: 844
    I use sunglasses with RX inserts.
    Never had any issues with them fogging up and they've been great for me.

    Never had contacts and never wanted them, so inserted glasses are the only way for me to go.
  • step83step83 Posts: 3,723
    Been riding in the all weathers with my RX inserts, hot humid climbs, heavy rain, snow, hot sun cant say I've had a single issue fogging I can recall.

    Do agree contacts are great but a bit like the great divide, I have had dry eye issues, loosing sight halfway down a climb is not a pleasant experience nor is trying to work out if the contact fell out or is stuck halfway round your eye.
  • phil485phil485 Posts: 318
    alanyu wrote:
    e72c708da97739126c97b8f0f6198618377ae299.jpg

    Oakley Jawbreaker and Rudy Rydon, both are prescription lens. The lens were custom made in China.
    Do you have contact details?? I have the insert in my jawbreakers but would love a standard lens
  • molteni_manmolteni_man Posts: 209
    Hi all.
    I used to be a contact lens and glasses wearer for quite a few years until I took the plunge about 19 years ago and had my eyes lasered. Has been great for me and is something I would suggest people might consider. Understand that not all eyes can be suitable, but it’s worth having a couple of consultations. The consultations allow you to get medical opinion and also weigh up costs. I have to say I have saved £100’s through not buying glasses and contact lens. My eyesight is still 20/20 and don’t need to wear reading glasses at nearly 55 years old.
    My wife also needed contacts, but went and had eyes done about 6 years ago. Her only regret is that she didn’t do it sooner.
    As stated do get proper professional advice, visit several providers and look at feedback. The process has developed massively in the past 20 years too.
  • paul64paul64 Posts: 278
    I do a fair bit of swimming and running (and sometimes all three in one event!), so not having to have prescription goggles is also important, given the styles of prescription goggles is very limited.g.
    You're not wearing contact lenses when swimming are you?
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,314
    paul64 wrote:
    I do a fair bit of swimming and running (and sometimes all three in one event!), so not having to have prescription goggles is also important, given the styles of prescription goggles is very limited.g.
    You're not wearing contact lenses when swimming are you?

    Yes, I know, I know...just don't tell my optician or they will have a fit! She even tells me to take them out in the shower. Sod that.
  • paul64paul64 Posts: 278
    It's because of the advice I received years ago. A mate of mine (smartest person I know, annoyingly so, double major in biology and chemistry, retired in mid 40s, paid 2 mortgages in full each in 7 years yada yada) implored me not to do it when I was still playing tennis at 40 and kept the contacts in to swim. He told me it was not just bad but seriously bad. At one of the yearly checks I owned up to the optomotrist who said no, no no and explained it was due to parasites which can still be present in pool water despite the chemical treatment. Ah I said, they get behind the lens, no he replied they get into the cellular matrix of the lens and you can go blind in 24 hours.

    Now maybe, it's rare or has never happened but I have never worn lenses again in water for the subsequent 15 years. Incidentally, he added that a mate of his did a thesis on the bacteria levels in public jacuzzis and said the average jacuzzi has the same level as 10 domestiuc toilets. Sometimes in life you wish you didn't hear these things...
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,158
    After trying varifocals for reading and not getting on with them, I went down the one day disposable contact lens route. First ride using them at the weekend and a revelation. Able to wear my cycling glasses of choice, long vision unimpaired and now able to see and read the screen on the ELEMNT, even with all 10 fields in use. £65 for 3 months worth including 50% off any glasses and free eye tests.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,220
    philthy3 wrote:
    After trying varifocals for reading and not getting on with them, I went down the one day disposable contact lens route.

    If you get on with those, I recommend trying the monthly disposables (you only take them out to replace once a month). Similar cost and you can see when you get up in the morning! Though that does mean you soon realise how dirty the shower is...
  • Bumo_bBumo_b Posts: 211
    Another one for monthlies. I get them off the net from one of the major sites and works out about £25 for 3 months for Aqua Optix. Got tired of waking up at 5 am poking myself in the eye every morning. As for swimming, ooops!
  • lakesludditelakesluddite Posts: 1,314
    paul64 wrote:
    It's because of the advice I received years ago. A mate of mine (smartest person I know, annoyingly so, double major in biology and chemistry, retired in mid 40s, paid 2 mortgages in full each in 7 years yada yada) implored me not to do it when I was still playing tennis at 40 and kept the contacts in to swim. He told me it was not just bad but seriously bad. At one of the yearly checks I owned up to the optomotrist who said no, no no and explained it was due to parasites which can still be present in pool water despite the chemical treatment. Ah I said, they get behind the lens, no he replied they get into the cellular matrix of the lens and you can go blind in 24 hours.

    Now maybe, it's rare or has never happened but I have never worn lenses again in water for the subsequent 15 years. Incidentally, he added that a mate of his did a thesis on the bacteria levels in public jacuzzis and said the average jacuzzi has the same level as 10 domestiuc toilets. Sometimes in life you wish you didn't hear these things...

    censored . I guess I'll be going in with foggy vision then in future. Saying that, the goggles fog up anyway, so it can't make that much difference!
    I'll still probably wear them for triathlon though, I can't be doing with putting contacts in during transition - although I suppose getting prescription sunnies would solve this...which means this thread is getting more relevant to me now.
  • kingstongrahamkingstongraham Posts: 9,554
    paul64 wrote:
    It's because of the advice I received years ago. A mate of mine (smartest person I know, annoyingly so, double major in biology and chemistry, retired in mid 40s, paid 2 mortgages in full each in 7 years yada yada) implored me not to do it when I was still playing tennis at 40 and kept the contacts in to swim. He told me it was not just bad but seriously bad. At one of the yearly checks I owned up to the optomotrist who said no, no no and explained it was due to parasites which can still be present in pool water despite the chemical treatment. Ah I said, they get behind the lens, no he replied they get into the cellular matrix of the lens and you can go blind in 24 hours.

    Now maybe, it's rare or has never happened but I have never worn lenses again in water for the subsequent 15 years. Incidentally, he added that a mate of his did a thesis on the bacteria levels in public jacuzzis and said the average jacuzzi has the same level as 10 domestiuc toilets. Sometimes in life you wish you didn't hear these things...

    Even if you have well fitting goggles that don't leak, and throw the lenses away as soon as possible after getting out? No way would I be able to swim/scuba without being able to see!
    and then the next thing you know
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,158
    g00se wrote:
    philthy3 wrote:
    After trying varifocals for reading and not getting on with them, I went down the one day disposable contact lens route.

    If you get on with those, I recommend trying the monthly disposables (you only take them out to replace once a month). Similar cost and you can see when you get up in the morning! Though that does mean you soon realise how dirty the shower is...

    I had an 80+ ride yesterday, but had run out of lens sets. The Opthalmist kindly gave me some right side generic ones (the side that struggles with short distance focus) and that worked perfectly. Now I wonder if I can save some money by just buying right side lens. :D
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • janwaljanwal Posts: 455
    https://www.specsavers.co.uk/glasses/ho ... u=30746725
    I have just ordered a pair of these fitted with varifocal lenses with transitions reactolight coating £138. Which I don’t think is a bad price. They have slightly more curve than many sunglasses and are a fair bit deeper than my metal rimmed glasses I have been using. I prefer the transitions as I can wear them inside a cafe etc as the lenses change to clear glass and not have to carry a spare pair for that purpose.
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