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Lightest Bike

DylanMurphyDylanMurphy Posts: 39
edited October 2018 in Road buying advice
What is the lightest bike that you know of under £1000. The best that I can find is 8.9KG for a B'twin 900AF. Does anybody know of anything lighter? Thanks.
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  • SJH76SJH76 Posts: 191
    Merida Scultura is about 8.5 I think. That's for £999
  • craigus89craigus89 Posts: 887
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.
  • Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.

    Why?
  • Shortfall wrote:
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.

    Why?

    I live around hills and valleys.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,038
    It's the gearing that helps there
  • https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/ ... 5cm-frames is claimed to be ~8Kg, absolute bargain for £900 with BC discount.
    ================
    2020 Voodoo Marasa
    2017 Cube Attain GTC Pro Disc 2016
    2016 Voodoo Wazoo

  • Saw that but they only have it in 53cm unfortunately.
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    edited October 2018
    Shortfall wrote:
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.

    Why?

    I live around hills and valleys.

    Assuming you're not at an advanced level of fitness then a pound or two won't make a blind bit of difference to how well you can climb. There are many other things that "might" improve your climbing but buying a bag of sh1te that just happens to have a lower published weight than other bikes in your price bracket isn't one of them. As the previous poster informed you it is a fools errand.
  • joe_totale-2joe_totale-2 Posts: 1,333
    2018 Caad12 Tiagra's are on sale for £880 and are around 8.5kg

    If you can stretch another £100 you can get a 105 Supersix which is around the 8kg mark:

    https://www.drakescycles.co.uk/m1b0s6p5 ... o_105_2018

  • I reckon that's total BS. Maybe for the size XS with the wheels off.
  • Shortfall wrote:
    Shortfall wrote:
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.

    Why?

    I live around hills and valleys.

    Assuming you're not at an advanced level of fitness then a pound or two won't make a blind bit of difference to how well you can climb. Buying a bag of sh1te that just happens to have a lower published weight than other bikes in your price bracket is as the previous poster informed you is a fools errand.

    Okay, i'll take that into account. Apart from gear ratio shall I look at anything else in particular with regards to a climbing bike?
  • haydenmhaydenm Posts: 2,934
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I tend to assume they are all exaggerated down to a similar tune though so it's all relative even if the actual weight is higher. My other advice would be to buy in XS, ~400g in frame difference between mine and my mate's XL :lol:
  • shortfallshortfall Posts: 3,287
    Shortfall wrote:
    Shortfall wrote:
    Craigus89 wrote:
    Advertised weight is usually exaggerated down.

    If you're only looking at weight at that budget you're playing a fools game.

    I'm only interested in the weight of the bike.

    Why?

    I live around hills and valleys.

    Assuming you're not at an advanced level of fitness then a pound or two won't make a blind bit of difference to how well you can climb. Buying a bag of sh1te that just happens to have a lower published weight than other bikes in your price bracket is as the previous poster informed you is a fools errand.

    Okay, i'll take that into account. Apart from gear ratio shall I look at anything else in particular with regards to a climbing bike?

    I wouldn't concentrate on getting a "climbing bike" whatever you think that is. I'd go to a reputable shop and tell them your budget, exactly what you want out of your bike, the type of riding and distances you do (or hope to do) and your current fitness levels and goals. Gearing, wheels, tyre choice, position and fit are likely to have more influence than whether bike "A" weighs a pound less than bike "B".
  • joey54321joey54321 Posts: 1,297
    Things I take into consideration when buying a bike for <£100/not for competing:

    - My intended use
    - If it fits me
    - Gearing/other components I might have to change out at added £
    - Reliability
    - Price/value

    Things I really do not care about:
    - Weight
  • joey54321 wrote:
    Things I take into consideration when buying a bike for <£100/not for competing:

    - My intended use
    - If it fits me
    - Gearing/other components I might have to change out at added £
    - Reliability
    - Price/value

    Things I really do not care about:
    - Weight

    Thanks. I'll search again for a bike with this criteria in mind.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    No point in being light if its not stiff enough to transfer the power.

    I've been riding 35 years and don't know the weight of any of my bikes or fret over it. It's really not as important as you think.

    Joey has some good points there.
  • bmxboy10bmxboy10 Posts: 1,917

    I reckon that's total BS. Maybe for the size XS with the wheels off.

    Agreed!
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    Reviewed at 8.78 Kg so not a million miles out :

    https://road.cc/content/review/184313-b ... pro-carbon

    As they say - swap the wheels out for an upgrade and you're away.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    The quickest bike up a hill is not always the lightest.

    Focusing on weight alone is not going to help you much at any budget.

    One of the quickest road bikes I have in a climb is an old pinarello monvisio. Either the period kit, heavier tubular wheels, two spare tubs e.t.c it's 11kg. That does not slow me down though when I am climbing on it.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • Planet X pro carbon with Ultegra currently less that 1k advertised weight 8kg. https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/CBPXSLPUL ... -road-bike
  • timothywtimothyw Posts: 2,482
    The lightest bike you can get for under a grand is almost certainly a track bike with no gears, no brakes, and tubular tyres that cut up really easily outdoors.

    Which would be rubbish for riding in a hilly area ;-)

    Work out what you actually want from the bike - weight makes a pretty small difference to how a bike rides really.

    Pro carbon track - 6.5kg, £800 - https://www.planetx.co.uk/i/q/CBPXPCTB/ ... sport-bike
  • craigus89craigus89 Posts: 887
    Also, how much do you weigh OP?
  • alex222alex222 Posts: 598
    I'd go for the Rose below at 8.3kg, plus full 105 groupset.
    https://www.rosebikes.co.uk/rose-pro-sl-105-2672333
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    You could build. Sub 7kg or close to 6kg for £1000. I have done it.

    To do light have some fun. Find an older alloy frame. Stop it and get it anodised. I have a contact for that. Anodising is cheap and light. Buy older kit. It does not have yo be fancy. Built a light set of wheels and enjoy. The first light bike I did for myself was a trek 2300 dating from 1992. The frame weighed 2kg and complete the bike was 7.57kg. It's now a bit over 9 kg
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • Okay, i'll take that into account. Apart from gear ratio shall I look at anything else in particular with regards to a climbing bike?
    The thing that makes a climbing bike is the lump of flesh pushing the pedals. Buy the bike that looks pretty, then ride it up some hills. Congratulations, you now own a climbing bike.
  • CandyonCandyon Posts: 24
    8.2 kg for Canyon Endurace Al 7

    https://www.canyon.com/en-gb/road/endur ... l-7-0.html

    However I agree weight isn't the be all and end all.

    I have a Canyon Ultimate CF SL weighing just over 7.5 kg and just recently got a Specialized Diverge E5 Comp that weighs about 10.5 kg (I've not weighed it so could be more).

    On my first ride on the Diverge I went up a hill and posted my 3rd best time on Strava up it. The bike was stock apart from pedals, cages and a few other bits added to it. So it could have been faster with some better tyres and wheels. But the lower gearing certainly made up for the difference in weight I think.

    Though I did go up the same hill a couple of days later and do a personal best up it on the Ultimate. But I thought I'd be nowhere near on the Diverge and it wasn't like that at all.
  • alistairdalistaird Posts: 290
    Fenix wrote:
    No point in being light if its not stiff enough to transfer the power.

    I've been riding 35 years and don't know the weight of any of my bikes or fret over it. It's really not as important as you think.

    Joey has some good points there.

    +1 for this - especially if you are not 50kg... I'm nearer 100kg and stiffness is much more important that weight - I could relatively easily lose the weight of my bicycle (less pies...) Flex is worse than an extra 1kg of bicycle weight...

    A
    Alistair


    Best Weather Bike - Time ZXRS
    Summer Road Bike - Pinarello FPX Dogma
    Winter Road Bike- Colnago E1
    Being Dismantled - Sintesi Blade
    Mountain Bike - Sold them all....
  • Pretty standard bikeradar thread here. Guy asks a reasonable question and people jump on with arsey, pointless, timewasting answers intermixed with a few reasonable ones where they explain their opinion rather than act like a troll. Kudos to the 2nd type...to the others just stop will you?
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    And there's me thinking it was a pretty useful thread with some well thought out answers. Apart from the latest post ?
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