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Ride London 2019 anyone?

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  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    phreak wrote:
    To be fair, the course is probably more what most people associate with a bike race than the tedious criteriums that make up the majority of the actual racing scene in the UK. If you get into cycling watching the Tour or Giro and then the only races are an hour around an airfield somewhere, it's not really the same, is it?

    Closed circuit races and crits have their place, but there are also lots of open road races around the UK, for anyone who can be arsed to look on the BC calendar...
  • ugo.santaluciaugo.santalucia Posts: 25,718
    Imposter wrote:

    Closed circuit races and crits have their place, but there are also lots of open road races around the UK, for anyone who can be arsed to look on the BC calendar...

    Although some are disappearing, not having the "money" to bribe councils into closing roads... there used to be an Archer GP when I lived in Bucks, a race with 50 years of history... gone :(
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,187
    Imposter wrote:
    phreak wrote:
    To be fair, the course is probably more what most people associate with a bike race than the tedious criteriums that make up the majority of the actual racing scene in the UK. If you get into cycling watching the Tour or Giro and then the only races are an hour around an airfield somewhere, it's not really the same, is it?

    Closed circuit races and crits have their place, but there are also lots of open road races around the UK, for anyone who can be arsed to look on the BC calendar...

    For sure, but I doubt there are many of the same kind of length as the average sportive? The vast majority of racing in the UK is on crit circuits, which, as you say, have their place, but I doubt many got into cycling so they could race them. Having done crits at Hog Hill et al and continental sportives, I know which are more enjoyable, and to be honest more of a physical test. I'm no fan of the RL event, but there is an awful lot of snobbery from folk who think they're cool because they go around a circuit for an hour. It really aint all that.
  • jgsijgsi Posts: 5,027
    phreak wrote:
    Winning a Sportive. Now I’ve heard it all.

    To be fair, the course is probably more what most people associate with a bike race than the tedious criteriums that make up the majority of the actual racing scene in the UK. If you get into cycling watching the Tour or Giro and then the only races are an hour around an airfield somewhere, it's not really the same, is it?

    It's a fair point.
    Says me , who races but just makes up the numbers nowadays.
    It's the prices of sportives that puts me off, end of. When I finish actually racing, I have no plans to get swept up by the enthusiasm of so called closed roads.
  • Interstingly I’ve just come across this

    https://forum.cyclinguk.org/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=124090

    It did make me smile.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    Imposter wrote:

    Closed circuit races and crits have their place, but there are also lots of open road races around the UK, for anyone who can be arsed to look on the BC calendar...

    Although some are disappearing, not having the "money" to bribe councils into closing roads... there used to be an Archer GP when I lived in Bucks, a race with 50 years of history... gone :(

    Archer GP was never a 'closed road' event though, although lack of funding probably did for it in the end. Ironically, it would probable have survived in today's climate..
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    phreak wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    phreak wrote:
    To be fair, the course is probably more what most people associate with a bike race than the tedious criteriums that make up the majority of the actual racing scene in the UK. If you get into cycling watching the Tour or Giro and then the only races are an hour around an airfield somewhere, it's not really the same, is it?

    Closed circuit races and crits have their place, but there are also lots of open road races around the UK, for anyone who can be arsed to look on the BC calendar...

    For sure, but I doubt there are many of the same kind of length as the average sportive? The vast majority of racing in the UK is on crit circuits, which, as you say, have their place, but I doubt many got into cycling so they could race them. Having done crits at Hog Hill et al and continental sportives, I know which are more enjoyable, and to be honest more of a physical test. I'm no fan of the RL event, but there is an awful lot of snobbery from folk who think they're cool because they go around a circuit for an hour. It really aint all that.

    You've got to start somewhere. The competition 'mindset' (ie racing, not sportives) is not about duration or distance though. That's kind of missing the point. The kind of people who are interested in racing against other people don't really mind whether they race for an hour around Hillingdon or 2-3 hours in an open road E/1/2/3. If you don't want to race that's fine, but don't cite the 'lack of three-week stages races for 4th cats' as an excuse.
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,481
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing
  • mrfpb wrote:
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing

    It’s a crit race with a flat / sprinters stage attached to it ( which is traditionally effectively neutralised due to tradition unless it’s mighty close in the G.C. stakes) and even then I can’t remember anyone trying to close out the standing maillot Jaune .
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    mrfpb wrote:
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing

    It's a stage which includes multiple laps of a finishing circuit. It's not a 'neutralised' stage though, as the bloke above incorrectly suggests. The final stage is always fast, once in Paris. The agreement is that nobody attacks GC, but that doesn't stop anyone racing hard to the line...
  • philbar72 wrote:
    thought this was about RL100 or something.

    i'll be ride along Marshalling again next year. its great to be able to give back to all the cyclists that can't be arsed with (or aren't competent enough to) changing a tube or putting their wheels back in correctly.

    nice to see a marshall won it this year as well.
    I have it on good authority he was perfectly willing to assist anyone he came across who needed it :lol:
  • BikerGroveishBikerGroveish Posts: 183
    edited August 2018
    Imposter wrote:
    mrfpb wrote:
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing

    It's a stage which includes multiple laps of a finishing circuit. It's not a 'neutralised' stage though, as the bloke above incorrectly suggests. The final stage is always fast, once in Paris. The agreement is that nobody attacks GC, but that doesn't stop anyone racing hard to the line...

    I said “effectively a neutralised stage” which it is with regards to the M.J. The lower order positions can still shuffle about so to that end it isn’t a truly neutralised stage. But only if the M.J. had an off which caused him to be physically unable to continue would the stage continue and he’d then not win the G.C. but that is the only circumstance in which he wouldn’t win the G.C. and I can’t ever remember that happening. Anyway back on topic has anyone got any idea how the ballot for the 2019 Ride London is going regarding numbers so far?
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    Imposter wrote:
    mrfpb wrote:
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing

    It's a stage which includes multiple laps of a finishing circuit. It's not a 'neutralised' stage though, as the bloke above incorrectly suggests. The final stage is always fast, once in Paris. The agreement is that nobody attacks GC, but that doesn't stop anyone racing hard to the line...

    I said “effectively a neutralised stage” which it is. If the M.J. had an off which caused him to be physically unable to continue then the stage would continue and he’d then not win the G.C. but that is the only circumstance in which he wouldn’t win the G.C. and I can’t ever remember that happening. Anyway back on topic has anyone got any idea how the ballot for the 2019 Ride London is going regarding numbers so far?

    The problem is your understanding of the word 'neutralised' - which if you are new to cycling is understandable. 'Neutralised' simply means that racing is suspended, even if the bunch is moving - such as at the roll-out of a stage, or if a crash prevents safe racing on a circuit. As mentioned earlier, there is a 'modern' unwritten rule that GC is not threatened on the final stage. Fignon still lost the lead to Lemond on the final stage in 89, although that was probably before your time..
  • Imposter wrote:
    Imposter wrote:
    mrfpb wrote:
    Isn't the last stage of TdF essentially a crit? For lots of people (me included) it's probably their first viewing of elite bike racing

    It's a stage which includes multiple laps of a finishing circuit. It's not a 'neutralised' stage though, as the bloke above incorrectly suggests. The final stage is always fast, once in Paris. The agreement is that nobody attacks GC, but that doesn't stop anyone racing hard to the line...

    I said “effectively a neutralised stage” which it is. If the M.J. had an off which caused him to be physically unable to continue then the stage would continue and he’d then not win the G.C. but that is the only circumstance in which he wouldn’t win the G.C. and I can’t ever remember that happening. Anyway back on topic has anyone got any idea how the ballot for the 2019 Ride London is going regarding numbers so far?

    The problem is your understanding of the word 'neutralised' - which if you are new to cycling is understandable. 'Neutralised' simply means that racing is suspended, even if the bunch is moving - such as at the roll-out of a stage, or if a crash prevents safe racing on a circuit. As mentioned earlier, there is a 'modern' unwritten rule that GC is not threatened on the final stage. Fignon still lost the lead to Lemond on the final stage in 89, although that was probably before your time..

    Yes you’re quite right I edited my post to correct myself after you quoted it. “New to cycling” I ain’t. I do remember the Fignon Lemond race in 89 and seem to remember the result wasn’t well received at the time.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    Yes you’re quite right I edited my post to correct myself after you quoted it. “New to cycling” I ain’t. I do remember the Fignon Lemond race in 89 and seem to remember the result wasn’t well received at the time.

    Are you sure you're not new to cycling? I only ask because you don't seem to know very much. The result certainly wasn't received very well by Fignon, but given that the final stage that year was a TT and Fignon (as the leader) was off last, it was all about setting the fastest time. Who else do you recall 'not receiving the result very well'..?
  • phreakphreak Posts: 2,187
    Pointless willy waving seems strangely appropriate for a thread about Ride London.
  • TashmanTashman Posts: 2,760
    I've entered for the first time. Not expecting a place but we'll wait and see
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    phreak wrote:
    Pointless willy waving seems strangely appropriate for a thread about Ride London.

    bikergrovish is the reincarnation of milemuncher, if that changes your perspective...or maybe not...
  • figbatfigbat Posts: 680
    I said “effectively a neutralised stage” which it is with regards to the M.J. The lower order positions can still shuffle about so to that end it isn’t a truly neutralised stage.
    I am new to watching road racing and really only understand the basics of how it all works, But even I recognised that the GC is only one of the classifications on offer, and to some individuals the other jerseys are worth as much to them and are far from "lower order positions". The points, the combative, the young rider and the team all come to mind (cognisant that the mountain classification isn't going to change on stage 21). And then there's the kudos of the stage win itself, riding over the line on the Champs Elysées having out-sprinted a world-class field (try convincing Alexander Kristoff that he won an effectively neutralised stage).
    Cube Reaction GTC Pro 29 for the lumpy stuff
    Cannondale Synapse alloy with 'guards for the winter roads
    Fuji Altamira 2.7 for the summer roads
    Trek 830 Mountain Track frame turned into a gravel bike - for anywhere & everywhere
  • figbat wrote:
    I said “effectively a neutralised stage” which it is with regards to the M.J. The lower order positions can still shuffle about so to that end it isn’t a truly neutralised stage.
    I am new to watching road racing and really only understand the basics of how it all works, But even I recognised that the GC is only one of the classifications on offer, and to some individuals the other jerseys are worth as much to them and are far from "lower order positions". The points, the combative, the young rider and the team all come to mind (cognisant that the mountain classification isn't going to change on stage 21). And then there's the kudos of the stage win itself, riding over the line on the Champs Elysées having out-sprinted a world-class field (try convincing Alexander Kristoff that he won an effectively neutralised stage).

    >slow clap<
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,171
    How many crits have you actually ridden Groovy or is it muncher.
  • Imposter wrote:
    Yes you’re quite right I edited my post to correct myself after you quoted it. “New to cycling” I ain’t. I do remember the Fignon Lemond race in 89 and seem to remember the result wasn’t well received at the time.

    Are you sure you're not new to cycling? I only ask because you don't seem to know very much. The result certainly wasn't received very well by Fignon, but given that the final stage that year was a TT and Fignon (as the leader) was off last, it was all about setting the fastest time. Who else do you recall 'not receiving the result very well'..?

    If 35 years riding experience is “New” then yes I am. I might not be 100 percent on the newer aspects of road bikes but that’s because I’ve never been purely a hardcore roady I’ve always considered roadies to be a bit limp wristed for want of a better term. Road riding really isn’t the be all and end all of cycling. In fact it’s the one aspect I have the most disdain for especially at the pro end. As for the TdF stage you were banging on about well obviously if the last stage is a TT stage isn’t going to be able to be run as they tend to be ( a social ride to Paris with a crit at the end ) but they rarely have TTs as the final stage.
  • webboo wrote:
    How many crits have you actually ridden Groovy or is it muncher.

    Probably 10 in total. They really aren’t my favourite thing. I’m not muncher. But he does read what’s written on here and does communicate with me trying to get me to respond in the terms he would. I’m not quite as short tempered and intolerant of forum keyboard warriors as he is though.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    Imposter wrote:
    Yes you’re quite right I edited my post to correct myself after you quoted it. “New to cycling” I ain’t. I do remember the Fignon Lemond race in 89 and seem to remember the result wasn’t well received at the time.

    Are you sure you're not new to cycling? I only ask because you don't seem to know very much. The result certainly wasn't received very well by Fignon, but given that the final stage that year was a TT and Fignon (as the leader) was off last, it was all about setting the fastest time. Who else do you recall 'not receiving the result very well'..?

    If 35 years riding experience is “New” then yes I am. I might not be 100 percent on the newer aspects of road bikes but that’s because I’ve never been purely a hardcore roady I’ve always considered roadies to be a bit limp wristed for want of a better term. Road riding really isn’t the be all and end all of cycling. In fact it’s the one aspect I have the most disdain for especially at the pro end. As for the TdF stage you were banging on about well obviously if the last stage is a TT stage isn’t going to be able to be run as they tend to be ( a social ride to Paris with a crit at the end ) but they rarely have TTs as the final stage.

    Whatever you say Nick.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,089
    edited August 2018
    webboo wrote:
    How many crits have you actually ridden Groovy or is it muncher.

    Probably 10 in total. They really aren’t my favourite thing. I’m not muncher. But he does read what’s written on here and does communicate with me trying to get me to respond in the terms he would. I’m not quite as short tempered and intolerant of forum keyboard warriors as he is though.

    Nick - you have never pinned a number on, or turned a wheel in competition. And stop with the "I'm not milemuncher, I'm his best mate" nonsense, it's embarrassing, it's hilarious and it's also desperately sad. It's also extremely ironic, given that you are the very definition of a 'keyboard warrior' if ever there was one..
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,171
    webboo wrote:
    How many crits have you actually ridden Groovy or is it muncher.

    Probably 10 in total. They really aren’t my favourite thing. I’m not muncher. But he does read what’s written on here and does communicate with me trying to get me to respond in the terms he would. I’m not quite as short tempered and intolerant of forum keyboard warriors as he is though.
    I thought it was only MF who had an alter ego.
    How tragic it all is.
  • I was fortunate enough to get a place in the secondary ballot this year but don’t expect the same for 2019 so I am going for a charity place. There are some lesser known charities that only require £100 to be raised.
  • capt_slogcapt_slog Posts: 3,447
    Tony Rymer wrote:
    I was fortunate enough to get a place in the secondary ballot this year but don’t expect the same for 2019 so I am going for a charity place. There are some lesser known charities that only require £100 to be raised.

    Although they only require you to raise £100, I'll bet that they are hoping you'll find a lot more. RideLondon sells the charity places to the charities for quite a high fee, often £300+, it was discussed quite a bit last year.

    I've been in two ballots and didn't get through either, so rode for a charity to get my places in 2016 and 17. Having found the true cost and not feeling that I could raise the amounts needed I decided that I wouldn't do it via that route again, and when I didn't get a ballot place I didn't bother for 2018.

    This year after seeing the weather on RL, I realised that I had such a good day on the 2017 ride that I didn't think i could better it, so I'm not even attempting the ballot for 2019.


    The older I get, the better I was.

  • webboo wrote:
    How many crits have you actually ridden Groovy or is it muncher.

    Probably 10 in total. They really aren’t my favourite thing. I’m not muncher. But he does read what’s written on here and does communicate with me trying to get me to respond in the terms he would. I’m not quite as short tempered and intolerant of forum keyboard warriors as he is though.

    Is there someone who can sit with you?
  • sherersherer Posts: 2,440
    anyone defer from last year ? was meant to be an email sent but I never received anything. I've emailed them this morning via the helpdesk and had nothing back.
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