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*Help* Is my Canyon frame cracked?

efvinkefvink Posts: 13
edited September 2018 in Workshop
Bike: Canyon Endurace CF SLX 2018
Age: 1,5 months old bike
KM's ridden: Only about 1000km
Problem: Crack where seatpost goes into frame on both sides?

Whats_App_Image_2018_04_14_at_14_13_56_2.jpg
https://ibb.co/gFvqxS
Whats_App_Image_2018_04_14_at_14_13_56.jpg
https://ibb.co/hBK5Wn


Hi all,

Main question
Would you ride it in this condition? And if not... can i demand a solution for my holiday from Canyon for this problem on a 1,5 month old bike?

Context
I need your advice! Today I cleaned my bike and found these marks on my bike....
I can feel them if i go over them with my nail. Is this a paint crack or is there something worse going on?!

The problem is that i've booked a cycling holiday (april 18-21) with friends months ago and a refund is not an option. (also, i really really don't wanna mis out)

I've reported it to Canyon, but haven't heard from them yet due to weekend. I'm hoping to get a replacement bike/frame for my epic ride. But there might be a chance that it needs to be sent away or something awful like that. And that would ruin my holiday completely.

Thanks all!
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Posts

  • noodlemannoodleman Posts: 852
    Structural area. Usually would happen if you cut your seat tube too short. Definitely send it back.
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  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,360
    Sorry I don’t think Canyon will offer a solution to your holiday problem.
    Wait to see the outcome of your contact with them and then if need be you could look into hiring a bike for your holiday.

    Good luck with it.
  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    noodleman wrote:
    Structural area. Usually would happen if you cut your seat tube too short. Definitely send it back.

    Looks like that kind of problem. Only the seat tube is only half way it's maximum... so shouldn't have happened :?
  • Has it taken an impact?
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    No chance that will be sorted out by Wednesday, and no chance Canyon will be responsible for your holiday, so if you want to go I'd make an alternative plan quickly.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    Has it taken an impact?

    Nope. No impact. Only silky smooth roads and handled with care 8)
  • Vino'sGhostVino'sGhost Posts: 4,320
    Oh dear. It’s censored
  • Great video here explaining about carbon frames. Skip past the stupid intro. Long video but you'll be the wiser at the end of it about carbon frames. Answered a lot of questions for me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qsLYlVWkbQ

    I have to admit it reinforced my concerns about carbon frames though and came away feeling that they were a bit of a liability, easy to break and not a material you can be totally sure about. De-lamination, ripples in the fibres and lots of buzz words to explain why a carbon frame has failed or will fail. When you look at how some carbon frames are made in China in dirty sweatshop environments and then the points about the level of skill required and clean environment I don't think it's any surprise many frames fail although he states the learning process is continuing and improving quality which is good but then I think commercially many lower cost carbon frame manufacturer's in China have taken over from higher quality Taiwanese manufacturers which maybe is a force for reducing quality?

    Interesting about the 5 year life of aluminium due to fatigue yet no fatigue life for carbon but it's brittle nature means it can be easily damaged.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Not that easy to break Bonzo. I've had CF bikes for about 20 years now and not broken one. I have had a chromed steel bike corrode straight through though. CF can also be fixed quite often very easily.

    This looks like a warranty claim so no reason to be put off.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    Great video here explaining about carbon frames. Skip past the stupid intro. Long video but you'll be the wiser at the end of it about carbon frames. Answered a lot of questions for me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qsLYlVWkbQ

    I have to admit it reinforced my concerns about carbon frames though and came away feeling that they were a bit of a liability, easy to break and not a material you can be totally sure about. De-lamination, ripples in the fibres and lots of buzz words to explain why a carbon frame has failed or will fail. When you look at how some carbon frames are made in China in dirty sweatshop environments and then the points about the level of skill required and clean environment I don't think it's any surprise many frames fail although he states the learning process is continuing and improving quality which is good but then I think commercially many lower cost carbon frame manufacturer's in China have taken over from higher quality Taiwanese manufacturers which maybe is a force for reducing quality?

    Interesting about the 5 year life of aluminium due to fatigue yet no fatigue life for carbon but it's brittle nature means it can be easily damaged.

    Not the first time you've posted about deficiencies in Chinese manufacturing carbon. It's almost as if you have an ulterior motive.......
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • JakeJJakeJ Posts: 151
    Damn, such a nice bike too. :(
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,168
    Great video here explaining about carbon frames. Skip past the stupid intro. Long video but you'll be the wiser at the end of it about carbon frames. Answered a lot of questions for me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qsLYlVWkbQ

    I have to admit it reinforced my concerns about carbon frames though and came away feeling that they were a bit of a liability, easy to break and not a material you can be totally sure about. De-lamination, ripples in the fibres and lots of buzz words to explain why a carbon frame has failed or will fail. When you look at how some carbon frames are made in China in dirty sweatshop environments and then the points about the level of skill required and clean environment I don't think it's any surprise many frames fail although he states the learning process is continuing and improving quality which is good but then I think commercially many lower cost carbon frame manufacturer's in China have taken over from higher quality Taiwanese manufacturers which maybe is a force for reducing quality?

    Interesting about the 5 year life of aluminium due to fatigue yet no fatigue life for carbon but it's brittle nature means it can be easily damaged.

    Yes that'll be why crashing, bunny hopping and slinging the bike around for storage has absolutely no effect on my carbon framed bikes structural integrity.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    JakeJ wrote:
    Damn, such a nice bike too. :(

    I know right... :shock:
  • redvisionredvision Posts: 2,567
    Canyon will sort it. But i suspect you will have a wait whilst they arrange the warranty replacement.
    Unfortunately there is no chance they will cover your holiday bike hire costs.

    My tip, hire a really cheap nasty censored bike. Then when you get back and ride the canyon it will feel even better than it would have! :)
  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    redvision wrote:
    Canyon will sort it. But i suspect you will have a wait whilst they arrange the warranty replacement.
    Unfortunately there is no chance they will cover your holiday bike hire costs.

    My tip, hire a really cheap nasty censored bike. Then when you get back and ride the canyon it will feel even better than it would have! :)

    Haha this is the kind of tip that makes my day
  • svetty wrote:
    Great video here explaining about carbon frames. Skip past the stupid intro. Long video but you'll be the wiser at the end of it about carbon frames. Answered a lot of questions for me.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-qsLYlVWkbQ

    I have to admit it reinforced my concerns about carbon frames though and came away feeling that they were a bit of a liability, easy to break and not a material you can be totally sure about. De-lamination, ripples in the fibres and lots of buzz words to explain why a carbon frame has failed or will fail. When you look at how some carbon frames are made in China in dirty sweatshop environments and then the points about the level of skill required and clean environment I don't think it's any surprise many frames fail although he states the learning process is continuing and improving quality which is good but then I think commercially many lower cost carbon frame manufacturer's in China have taken over from higher quality Taiwanese manufacturers which maybe is a force for reducing quality?

    Interesting about the 5 year life of aluminium due to fatigue yet no fatigue life for carbon but it's brittle nature means it can be easily damaged.

    Not the first time you've posted about deficiencies in Chinese manufacturing carbon. It's almost as if you have an ulterior motive.......

    Yeah I'm not super keen on carbon it has to be said but that youtube video is clearly speaking to an engineer who loves carbon but lists the many issues fairly I would say. Of the carbon frame manufacturers I have a fondness for Giant and Merida both manufacturers who have been making carbon frames for sometime and have gone through recalls etc and seem now to have quite advanced carbon frame manufacturing facilities but have a price higher than many others so have lost much oem business. I'm not keen on the blatant upselling of basic chinese carbon frames under prestigious brands with huge markups for sure but then I don't do the brand love thing and just look at the actual product you are getting for your money which can vary even for the same brand. The important thing is the video is highly informative with some great information that surely can benefit anyone interested in carbon framed bikes.

    My motives are exactly the points I've raised so hardly ulterior. Many others have responded with completely incorrect information often easy to pick apart almost instantly but never given their motives for stating such false information in the first place. Other comments with childish undertones like yours.
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,901
    The thing is, Bonzo, your views on CF seem to be as outdated as the YT link you posted.
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    My motives are exactly the points I've raised so hardly ulterior. Many others have responded with completely incorrect information often easy to pick apart almost instantly but never given their motives for stating such false information in the first place. Other comments with childish undertones like yours.

    My comment was perhaps cynical but hardly childish. Tell you what, you cut out the borderline xenophobic 'Chinese sweat-shop' stuff and I'll happily refrain from pointing it out :lol:
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,022
    To be honest, I'd ride it anyway and post it off when you get back. Worst case scenario the seatpost starts to slip and you have to hire a bike but that's what you would have done anyway.

    Does look like a new frame in the long term but what if you hadn't noticed until after you got back?

    Doesn't look like a critical structural area to me.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,904
    To be honest, I'd ride it anyway and post it off when you get back. Worst case scenario the seatpost starts to slip and you have to hire a bike but that's what you would have done anyway.

    Does look like a new frame in the long term but what if you hadn't noticed until after you got back?

    Doesn't look like a critical structural area to me.

    Or splits the rest of the way on a nice fast downhill......
    I don't do smileys.

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  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 10,901
    Doesn't look like a critical structural area to me.

    Are you joking? If those cracks propagate, the seatpost will literally fall out the back of the frame...
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,022
    Goes to show what I know!
  • Vino'sGhostVino'sGhost Posts: 4,320
    Goes to show what I know!

    Youd know about it if you ended up sitting on the back wheel :)
  • shirley_bassoshirley_basso Posts: 3,022
    Goes to show what I know!

    Youd know about it if you ended up sitting on the back wheel :)

    I guess I'm one of those people who is bad at judging risk. I'd ride it and see if it got any worse and then either come home and replace it or come home in an ambulance.
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 780
    The seatpost shouldn't slip as the 'clamp' is a lot further down the tube so it's not being held where the crack is. I have exactly the same frame and the lower clamp allows the seatpost to flex more as if you had more sticking out of the frame.

    Trouble with that is that it will flex more against the area with the crack I would imagine. Not sure the lay back post (if it's the same as mine) will help either as more pressure backwards?
  • svettysvetty Posts: 1,904
    If the bike is only a few weeks old what did you ride before then? Can you not just take your old bike/winter on the trip?
    FFS! Harden up and grow a pair :D
  • Vino'sGhostVino'sGhost Posts: 4,320
    Goes to show what I know!

    Youd know about it if you ended up sitting on the back wheel :)

    I guess I'm one of those people who is bad at judging risk. I'd ride it and see if it got any worse and then either come home and replace it or come home in an ambulance.

    :):)
  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    svetty wrote:
    If the bike is only a few weeks old what did you ride before then? Can you not just take your old bike/winter on the trip?

    Sold the old bike... bit too soon i guess. I know you should have a winter bike. But i just can't get myself to not ride the coolest bike i've got :roll:
  • efvinkefvink Posts: 13
    UPDATE:

    Canyon were able to confirm that it was only a crack in the paint... I'm guessing they've seen this issue before as they were pretty clear in their statement. 'you will be able to ride it without any safety issues' they said. So i'm now enjoying my bike trip across the south of the Netherlands and afterwards they'll pick the bike up at my home and replace the frame without any costs. Must say i'm impressed by this service level.

    All is well now :-)
  • Vino'sGhostVino'sGhost Posts: 4,320
    efvink wrote:
    UPDATE:

    Canyon were able to confirm that it was only a crack in the paint... I'm guessing they've seen this issue before as they were pretty clear in their statement. 'you will be able to ride it without any safety issues' they said. So i'm now enjoying my bike trip across the south of the Netherlands and afterwards they'll pick the bike up at my home and replace the frame without any costs. Must say i'm impressed by this service level.

    All is well now :-)

    Marvellous.
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