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Bone density

diydiy Posts: 6,680
Apparently you roadies need to get down the gym and pump some big weights in the pit with all the synthol freaks :D
https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/why- ... mprove-it/

Or take up MTBing :o

Posts

  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    I think our roads are quite bad enough to negate the need to cross to the dark side ;)
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Or run.
  • herb71herb71 Posts: 253
    Or just be a fatty like me! My bones get loaded every time I walk up the stairs.
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
  • oxomanoxoman Posts: 9,277
    Put into perspective if your a roadie your still better off than an office bound desk jockey or tea swilling car based company rep. Stuff the weights, I carry enough in my toolbag at work.
    Too many bikes according to Mrs O.
  • I'll run once every other week or so. A 5k or a 10k. I dont' find it's detrimental to my riding if I keep the pace reasonable.

    The cyclocross riders probably have it down!
  • cougie wrote:
    Or run.
    This is way more useful than weights for BMD. Anything with impacts/light jarring is much better for BMD.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    I saw the programme on the iplayer last night.
    They measured BMD for elite cyclists, cricketers and gymnasts.

    Of the three - cyclists were below normal. Gymnasts slightly above, but Cricketers about 20% above normal. Interesting results !
  • Fenix wrote:
    I saw the programme on the iplayer last night.
    They measured BMD for elite cyclists, cricketers and gymnasts.

    Of the three - cyclists were below normal. Gymnasts slightly above, but Cricketers about 20% above normal. Interesting results !
    That's what you'd expect given the nature of the activity. I'd expect cricketers (elite, not park) to do quite a bit of running/jogging in their fitness regime, as well as a lot involved in their fielding drills. Bowlers of course would run a fair bit as well. Field Hockey, basketball, soccer would all generally have high BMD compared with cyclists or swimmers due to the nature of the skeletal loading. Some comparison examples in the literature for high, medium and low skeletal impact activity, there are plenty of others:

    Aerobic dancers, squash players, speed skaters:
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 8295001513

    Vollyball, gymnasts, swimmers:
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 8295001719

    Netball/basketball, field hockey, swimming:
    http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/9139166

    Runners and cyclists:
    http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/10949001

    Weight training seems to be a bit equivocal as to whether it has no or a positive impact, but it's not negative.
  • Interesting reading! I sometimes worry about reduced bone density as I age and cycling is my main exercise. Maybe I should do something to combat that (anything apart from running, of course).
  • Weight training is a definite beneficial exercise to do at any age but once over 40 becomes more important. Maintain muscle mass, bone density and strengthen tendons and ligaments. You don't need to become a gym monkey but weights once or twice a week a very good idea.
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,458
    I find falling off my bike helps, the impact increases my bone density eventually.
  • LiamWLiamW Posts: 358
    Weight training is a definite beneficial exercise to do at any age but once over 40 becomes more important. Maintain muscle mass, bone density and strengthen tendons and ligaments. You don't need to become a gym monkey but weights once or twice a week a very good idea.

    I go to the gym and do the Starting Strength routine, basically squats, deadlift, overhead press and bench. Basically the routine requires you to add weight on every workout, but nothing to say you can't just get to a certain weight and maintain the weight you're working with.

    Nice change from sitting through an hour on the turbo tbh.
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