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Cold and wet weather clothing

keithc440keithc440 Posts: 276
edited January 2018 in Road general
Back today from a very wet and cold 3hr ride in West Lancashire today. Horrible. Could hardly change gear I was that cold and heaven had helped me if I had punctured. What clothing if any could have made this ride tolerable or are such days to be avoided.
I was wearing Assos Element one jacket that I admit is really only shower proof. Any waterproof jacket available that would not have left me sweating too much over a long ride ?
BIb tights. Are the one's advertised as rain resistant really such ?
Overshoes. Water always finds it way in from the top. Velotoze any good or too sweaty ?
LIkewise with glove. Water comes in from the top. Any gloves that stay warm even when wet ?
Head. Skull cap like a cold wet flannel after a bit. Any suggestions for keeping the head dry ? Aero helmet or cover ?
Any tips welcome. I've been at this for thirty years but still seem to get caught out at least once every winter. Should know better.
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  • keithc440 wrote:
    I've been at this for thirty years but still seem to get caught out at least once every winter.

    Maybe you don't cycle that much in winter? Pretty much from the end of November until the end of March those are typical riding conditions.
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • luv2rideluv2ride Posts: 2,339
    Castelli Difesa winter cap (made from Gore Windstopper with X-fast ear flaps a la Gabba) keeps my head and ears warm and dry.

    Got some neoprene gloves from Aldi during their last sale. Indistinguishable from the more expensive Endura versions. Don't attempt to keep hands dry but work well when very wet out. Always have a spare pair of gloves in a zipper bag, just in case.

    Yesterday I wore a Castelli Primaloft top (bought very cheap from Evans) paired with a long sleeve base, and an Event waterproof jacket (the jacket came off when the rain stopped mid-ride, but put back on as needed). The new Endura Primaloft gilet or jacket could be a good option for you...? Or the Sportful R&D Light jacket with the alpha insulation. Very warm, but impressively breathable, and still work well under a shell.

    As for feet, winter boots with merino Defeet Woolie Boolie socks, sometimes an extra pair of thin socks if perishing out, or an overshoes on top. If forecast to hammer it down, I use a neoprene gaiter to seal off the top of the boot. Same as spare dry suit cuffs, you can buy these online. Lifesaver.....oh, and always a neck buff.

    I now use a small frame bag or bigger saddle bag for winter rides so I can take spare gloves, hat etc). The larger saddle pack (6ltr Topeak backloader pack) also allows me to take a primaloft gilet compressed down, in case of mechanicals.
    https://www.merlincycles.com/topeak-bac ... dEQAvD_BwE

    I'd rather be prepared than be stuck miles from anywhere too cold to function... :wink:
    Scott Solace 10 disc - Kinesis Crosslight Pro6 disc - Scott CR1 SL - Pinnacle Arkose X 650b - Pinnacle Arkose 1x11 "monster cross" - Specialized Singlecross...& an Ernie Ball Musicman Stingray 4 string...
  • 5858558585 Posts: 223
    If it’s raining and just around freezing then you will end up wet, but as long as you keep warm you should be ok.

    The main thing is to keep moving and at a good pace, then your body will stay warm with some decent kit.

    I use prendas wind tunnel gloves and overshoes, neoprene based (seems very much like it anyway) so pretty much watertight but then you are guaranteed to get sweaty and will be wet but not cold.

    Full length lycra tights, roubaix leg warmers, long sleeve base layer, roubaix jacket, rain jacket, buff, roubaix skull cap and your choice of cap. Works for me in Scandinavian conditions, as long as you keep the pedals turning!
  • joe2008joe2008 Posts: 1,919
    Assos Sturmprinz in Lolly Red, highly visible as well as easily the most breathable waterproof I've ever used, and I've used a fair few. Very expensive, but worth every penny when it's cold and wet; they can go for a relative snip on ebay.

    Because it is also a great windbreaker, and as it's almost always windy on the North coast of Devon, I wear it all winter, rain or shine, then I adjust what I wear underneath for the appropriate temperature from: bonKa, haBu, tiburu, or intermediate.
  • kirkeekirkee Posts: 369
    Regarding over boots the neoprene type, water will always get in, dont even try to maintain dry feet! Try to get some that fit somewhere between snug and roomy. If they fit tightly they will reduce circulation and therefore reduce the point of wearing them in the first place. Worth trying different out different makes.
    Caveat - I buy and ride cheap, however, I reserve the right to advise on expensive kit that I have never actually used and possibly never will
  • joe2008joe2008 Posts: 1,919
    kirkee wrote:
    Regarding over boots the neoprene type, water will always get in, dont even try to maintain dry feet! Try to get some that fit somewhere between snug and roomy. If they fit tightly they will reduce circulation and therefore reduce the point of wearing them in the first place. Worth trying different out different makes.

    Sealskinz socks will keep your feet dry...ish
  • keithc440 wrote:
    I've been at this for thirty years but still seem to get caught out at least once every winter.

    Maybe you don't cycle that much in winter? Pretty much from the end of November until the end of March those are typical riding conditions.

    Well only four times a week. Only saw 3 other riders out in three hours so I looks like nobody bothers in winter.
    Yesterday's weather was really bad. I would give up cycling if it was like that all the time.
    Thanks for the replies everyone. Some good tips there on keeping dry. It's getting wet that's the problem.
  • Reading this from the sidelines due to mtb shoulder injury keeping me off the bike

    Winter (in South East Scotland)

    CX Bike with hydraulic disc brakes.

    HED Belgium + rims on Hope pro2 hubs set up tubeless with Schwalbe S One Tyres.

    SPD's

    Northwave Celsius spd boots
    Sealskin socks
    Castelli Primo socks under and if truly Baltic knee length under socks

    Castelli Wind Sorpasso bibs if truly Baltic 'barrier' down front!

    Castelli Alpha jacket with SS Castelli winter base and/or mountain warehouse LS base

    Castelli Chiro windstopper gloves with silk under gloves, Sealskin waterproof gloves in rear pocket for rain

    Castelli Pave rain jacket in rear middle pocket in case of rain.

    Old Northface Shelltex walking hat that covers ears or Endura baa baa marino woolie hat.

    Stop for hot coffee after 90-120 mins.

    so cold or icy that above is not suitable.... go out on mountain bike :-)

    always try to keep rubber side up.

    Kudos for being out in adverse conditions.

    wish it was me...
  • chippykchippyk Posts: 529
    FastFlo. Stopping for a brew when it’s truly cold or wet is one of my least favourite things, putting cold and clammy or wet clothes back on and setting out on cafe legs is horrible. If I’m out solo in that weather, say Ironman training, I meet my wife at the cafe for lunch and a change of kit
  • joe2008joe2008 Posts: 1,919
    keithc440 wrote:
    keithc440 wrote:
    I've been at this for thirty years but still seem to get caught out at least once every winter.

    Well only four times a week. Only saw 3 other riders out in three hours so I looks like nobody bothers in winter.
    Yesterday's weather was really bad. I would give up cycling if it was like that all the time.
    Thanks for the replies everyone. Some good tips there on keeping dry. It's getting wet that's the problem.

    I rarely see 3 other riders on a three hour ride in the middle of summer
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    Did you have mudguards on ? At least when it stops raining you stop getting wet.

    Sealskin gloves work for me in the wet - and neoprene if it's not too cold.

    The gore shake dry jacket gets good reviews.
  • Yes had mudguards. Thanks again for the tips on what you wear. Some interesting suggestions.
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    To add: Water is a very effective transmitter of heat - stopping yourself getting sprayed in water e.g. mudguards is most effective as is a pair of decent waterproof boots + overshoes. Your thigh muscles are a great heat generator and IME once they start getting cold, it's time to head home otherwise you'll suffer. A pair of GoreTex shorts can be a lifesaver - they pack-up tiny and don't create a boil-in-the-bag sensation. Avoid riding behind anyone without mudguards - riding on your own is better. If you do stop e.g. cafe only remove clothing if there's a chance to dry / get warm.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Coach HCoach H Posts: 1,287
    keithc440 wrote:
    Head. Skull cap like a cold wet flannel after a bit. Any suggestions for keeping the head dry ? Aero helmet or cover ?

    Try a BBB helmet cover. Very effective at keeping rain and wind off at a fraction of the price of a closed helmet. Very effective and doesnt look too stupid like some of the non stretch types.
    Other retailers are available https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/bbb-helm ... met-cover/
    BBBAZHEL300_1_ZOOM.jpg
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • EBEBEBEB Posts: 98
    Maybe I missed it, but the mistake I’ve made isn’t with cycling clothing (except no gloves in autumn), but is definitely not having trousers in my bag. Once you are going and hot I find only hands and big toes matter. When it is cold and raining and you get a puncture it is horrible even if you are quite quick. Also if you don’t have QR wheels some flip flops to walk in. I’ve actually had a car driver stop to ask if I was alright (I had pulled into a driveway enterance and the rain was torrential)
  • noodlemannoodleman Posts: 852
    Get a sportful fiandre extreme jacket. Best bit of kit I've ever used. My circulation is so bad that my feet turn blue just sitting watching tv with no socks on. I can wear the fiandre in weather well into minus figures with no base layer and it still keeps me warm.
    Water eventually gets through in places but this has no effect on keeping warm unless you're off the bike stood around for a while.
    argon 18 e116 2013 Vision Metron 80
    Bianchi Oltre XR Sram Red E-tap, Fulcrum racing speed xlr
    De Rosa SK pininfarina disc
    S Works Tarmac e-tap 2017
    Rose pro sl disc
  • FFS if the weather is that bad, stay indoors and get a turbo.
  • RossosRossos Posts: 7
    FFS if the weather is that bad, stay indoors and get a turbo.
    Always nice to have such a helpful balanced viewpoint.
    Thank you on behalf of the OP.

    Thread closed
  • No it's not.

    Look, on a serious note if it's utterly pissing down, howling gale and freezing cold why cycle outside unless you really have to. Being miserable whilst cycling doesn't really help plus it could be dangerous as unlikely to be concentrating on road/other traffic if all you can think of is how wet and cold you are.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    It is nice when you finish and eventually get warm and dry again. If you're never miserable out on the bike then you don't fully appreciate how great it is to be not miserable.
  • RossosRossos Posts: 7
    cougie wrote:
    It is nice when you finish and eventually get warm and dry again. If you're never miserable out on the bike then you don't fully appreciate how great it is to be not miserable.
    +1
  • Right well, I'll repeatedly slam my head against the wall then. Because when I stop I'll appreciate the lack of pain.

    Like I said before, FFS.
  • cougiecougie Posts: 22,512
    That's exactly how one of the club elders described cycling to me.

    If your turbo sessions are all sweetness and light - then you're really not doing it properly.
  • noodlemannoodleman Posts: 852
    Right well, I'll repeatedly slam my head against the wall then. Because when I stop I'll appreciate the lack of pain.

    Like I said before, FFS.

    But the OP is asking for advice on what to wear when it's wet and cold, which it generally is from October until April. If you can stand the monotony of turbo training for the best part of 6 months good for you but some people enjoy winter training. If there's clothing available to make winter riding slightly more comfortable (which there is) then I'm sure the OP would find these suggestions useful.
    argon 18 e116 2013 Vision Metron 80
    Bianchi Oltre XR Sram Red E-tap, Fulcrum racing speed xlr
    De Rosa SK pininfarina disc
    S Works Tarmac e-tap 2017
    Rose pro sl disc
  • Indeed but not if it's as I said previously pissing down, howling gale etc. I much prefer to ride outside and do as often as can but really don't see the point in going out in atrocious weather. I'm sure we've all been out in the wet as in this country(UK) it is pretty much unavoidable but if the weather is like it is here today, 40mph wind and rain then personally I'll get on the turbo. You can wear the best clothing on offer but sometimes it ain't worth it and downright dangerous to do so.

    From what the OP described it was pretty awful so in those circumstances I'll use turbo. By all means plough on through the wind and rain if it suits.
  • cougie wrote:
    That's exactly how one of the club elders described cycling to me.

    If your turbo sessions are all sweetness and light - then you're really not doing it properly.

    I put 100% into my cycling, indoor and out but the whole point to me is enjoyment. If it's not enjoyable then do something else. I reckon cycling in the pouring rain with 40mph wind and freezing cold is not enjoyable. But each to their own.
  • RiggaRigga Posts: 939
    EBEB wrote:
    . Also if you don’t have QR wheels some flip flops to walk in. I’ve actually had a car driver stop to ask if I was alright (I had pulled into a driveway enterance and the rain was torrential)

    ?? Flip flops to walk in. Eh? I'm confused :?
  • Rigga wrote:
    EBEB wrote:
    . Also if you don’t have QR wheels some flip flops to walk in. I’ve actually had a car driver stop to ask if I was alright (I had pulled into a driveway enterance and the rain was torrential)

    ?? Flip flops to walk in. Eh? I'm confused :?

    They work well for wet weather ...dry quick and light to carry and can fit in pocket easily.
  • RossosRossos Posts: 7
    Right well, I'll repeatedly slam my head against the wall then. Because when I stop I'll appreciate the lack of pain.

    Like I said before, FFS.
    Is it possible to follow people on this forum?

    I need your wisdom in my life.
  • Rossos wrote:
    Right well, I'll repeatedly slam my head against the wall then. Because when I stop I'll appreciate the lack of pain.

    Like I said before, FFS.
    Is it possible to follow people on this forum?

    I need your wisdom in my life.


    Well it was in response to this to which you gave it the +1 so figured you'd appreciate it as it's exactly the same.
    t is nice when you finish and eventually get warm and dry again. If you're never miserable out on the bike then you don't fully appreciate how great it is to be not miserable.
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