Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

Best place to clamp a carbon frame ?

SportivemanSportiveman Posts: 157
edited December 2017 in Road beginners
Hi
I have just bought my first carbon frame and forks to build up over winter , I have a bike stand where is the best place to clamp it to work on it ??
Ps do I have to be be very careful in case it cracks ?

Thanks
«1

Posts

  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,767
    Clamp it anywhere you like, as long as you don't over-tighten..
  • The seat post, not the tube. Tubes aren't meant to be clamped, posts are.
    Advocate of disc brakes.
  • ryan_w-2ryan_w-2 Posts: 1,162
    Clamped the top tube on all my carbon bikes.

    It just has to hold it there, not crush it to death.
    Specialized Allez Sprint Disc --- Specialized S-Works SL7

    IG: RhinosWorkshop
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Isn't a post a tube though?

    Basically anywhere so long as you don't overtighten it but preferably an Ali seat post that you keep just for occasions such as these.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • Ryan_W wrote:
    Clamped the top tube on all my carbon bikes.

    It just has to hold it there, not crush it to death.
    Yep, same here.

    8 years of using carbon and clamping in workstands and never a broken tube.
  • 964cup964cup Posts: 1,362
    I've used a tube-clamping stand for years (without problems) but recently switched to a pro-style workstand that clamps either front or rear dropouts. It's less convenient, but provides a much better platform for things requiring force, like fitting and removing chainsets and bottom brackets. Previously I have always clamped the seatpost on non-aero bikes (unless not fitted) and the toptube, wrapped in a cloth and tightened as little as possible, otherwise.
  • lesfirthlesfirth Posts: 1,286
    Isn't a post a tube though?

    Basically anywhere so long as you don't overtighten it but preferably an Ali seat post that you keep just for occasions such as these.

    IMHO if you tried to damage a carbon seat post by crushing it with a bike stand you would damage the stand first.

    I "hold" the top tube of my bike. I do not try to "clamp" it.
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 799
    I used to always clamp the post. Carbon or alu. Trouble is my new bike has a 'split' post that doesn't look like it would cope with that very well.

    Now I clamp the top tube but use as little force as possible and stick some packing stuff in there to avoid any scratches. I've not died yet.
  • upside down on the saddle and hoods. Put a towel down first.
    I'll get me coat...
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    lesfirth wrote:
    Isn't a post a tube though?

    Basically anywhere so long as you don't overtighten it but preferably an Ali seat post that you keep just for occasions such as these.

    IMHO if you tried to damage a carbon seat post by crushing it with a bike stand you would damage the stand first.

    I "hold" the top tube of my bike. I do not try to "clamp" it.


    agree but we all know of one particular person on here who crushed a carbon steerer with a stem before another stem he fitted fell off as he was riding along.


    you have to account for loeest common denominator remember .....
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • milemuncher1milemuncher1 Posts: 1,472
    Seat post.
  • upside down on the saddle and hoods. Put a towel down first.
    I'll get me coat...

    I'm here also. I guess I'll get my coat and hat and be out.

    The answer is seatpost. And with the caveat if it isn't round, you buy the correct clamp adapter.

    I have no space for too many tools. So, on the seat and hoods with towels for drivetrain maintenance. The main advantage of a stand being it places the bike at an ergonomic position so you may work standing or seated in a chair. Instead of kneeling. But, you can put it on an eating table while the wife is out of the house if you wish.

    The ergonomics matter for a shop technician working all day.

    It takes no time to do most of the tasks. Bar tape? Maybe 10 min. Cassette or chain or crankset or all of it? Maybe 20min for all of it. It would take me longer to find where I left the stand!

    The only job I'd consider it for is running new internal cabling.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 19,204
    Definitely not on the decals.
    Take it from someone who learned the hard way. :oops:
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • At the mo it has no seatpost to use need to find out what size seatpost it takes and also front mech it’s a Boardman team carbon
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    31.6mm.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • At the mo it has no seatpost to use need to find out what size seatpost it takes and also front mech it’s a Boardman team carbon
    in that case clamp it where you want :wink:
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    I must admit though that following this thread doesn't bode well for the build.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • I must admit though that following this thread doesn't bode well for the build.
    Why doesn’t it bode well ?
  • MatthewfalleMatthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Well, so far you don't know how to clamp the frame, what size seat post you need or what kind/size of front mech........ I await b/b and headset questions with baited breath.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • We all have to learn somehow !!!
    I have a seatpost sorted now and possibly a groupset now .
  • navrig2navrig2 Posts: 1,712
    Well, so far you don't know how to clamp the frame, what size seat post you need or what kind/size of front mech........ I await b/b and headset questions with baited breath.

    In case you hadn't noticed this is the Beginners Forum......... give the guy a break.

    I clamp on the top tube but just hold it very loosely then tighten the clamp by turning the lever. That way I avoid a shock load on the tube. I suspect that I probably couldn't throw the clamp lever when it is tightened enough to damage the tube.

    Have a look on YouTube. There are loads of videos on bike maintenance.

    Park Tools also do help videos: https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
  • bobloboblo Posts: 360
    In the garage... ;-)
  • Hi
    I have just bought my first carbon frame and forks to build up over winter , I have a bike stand where is the best place to clamp it to work on it ??
    Ps do I have to be be very careful in case it cracks ?

    Thanks

    Doesn't matter where you clamp it. I don't have a carbon bike but I do live in Birmingham and I have never had any issues clamping my bike in the work stand. Where do you live?
  • mac9091mac9091 Posts: 196
    On the seat post.

    Would you rather replace a carbon seat post or a carbon frame?
  • Well, so far you don't know how to clamp the frame, what size seat post you need or what kind/size of front mech........ I await b/b and headset questions with baited breath.

    :lol:
  • mac9091 wrote:
    On the seat post.

    Would you rather replace a carbon seat post or a carbon frame?

    Quite.
  • Hi
    I have just bought my first carbon frame and forks to build up over winter , I have a bike stand where is the best place to clamp it to work on it ??
    Ps do I have to be be very careful in case it cracks ?

    Thanks

    Doesn't matter where you clamp it. I don't have a carbon bike but I do live in Birmingham and I have never had any issues clamping my bike in the work stand. Where do you live?

    If you clamp it on the frame, and screw it up (over tighten it ) you may hear a bit of a creak / crack at the time. Then you’ll ride off, then you’ll hit a pothole, then you’ll end up in a heap, because the frame fails, rapidly. Been there done that, learned a lesson, won’t repeat it.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    I'd suggest not clamping a carbon frame anywhere. The top tube on mine is so thin I can squash it vertically with my fingers. If I have to clamp it I stick an old alloy seatpost in and clamp that.
  • igstaigsta Posts: 56
    another vote here for clamping top tube lightly. i also have one of those split seat posts which leaves me very little options.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    I think Keef has a very good point - test the desired clamping area with your hand first - if it's thin and you can compress it then it's not a good place to clamp.

    Mine have been fine clamping on the top tube - although sometimes I do switch it around to clamp on the seat tube if I need to do something a bit more meaty.

    There's little in bike maintenance that I've come across that needs huge force - if it needs that much then I'll pop it on the floor on it's wheels (even if just temporarily fixed) to do that job - before putting it back in the stand to finish off.
Sign In or Register to comment.