Power meters

psittacosis
psittacosis Posts: 97
I'm starting to think one is not enough.

Comments

  • Depends on your discipline. For me it's 2, one on my road bike and one on my TT bike.
  • kesa
    kesa Posts: 35
    If you need more than one wouldn't you just get a type allows it to be switched over such as a crank or pedal meter?
  • FatTed
    FatTed Posts: 1,205
    One on the bike the other on the Turbo, or have an indoor trainer with power.
  • JesseD
    JesseD Posts: 1,961
    I only have the 1, but am thinking I need at least 3, one for the race bike, one for the TT bike and one for the winter training bike. In reality I probably dont need one at all!
    Obsessed is a word used by the lazy to describe the dedicated!
  • StillGoing
    StillGoing Posts: 5,211
    P2M on the main bike and a smart trainer with inbuilt power meter.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • okgo
    okgo Posts: 4,368
    I have one per bike. So 3, all quarq, all adjusted to match each other
    Blog on my first and now second season of proper riding/racing - www.firstseasonracing.com
  • I've got one, which I am going to swap to the turbo/winter bike. But I think the right number is 3.
    One for TT bike, 1 for summer road bike, 1 for winter/turbo bike.
    I CBA with the faffing around moving PM from bike to bike.
  • fat daddy
    fat daddy Posts: 2,605
    I think, realistically that 1 power meter is all you need to realize you dont need a power meter

    however I want 3

    (1) on the turbo
    (2) on the wet weather road bike (99% of the time I am on the best bike I dont give a crap about power)
    (3) On the TT bike that I dont own anyway,but if I did I would want a PM on it :D
  • Alex99
    Alex99 Posts: 1,407
    If you're just riding, then you don't need one. If you're training, then it's better to have one for every ride. So, anyone can work out the best way to achieve that.
  • ="Alex99"So, anyone can work out the best way to achieve that.
    What did you do?
  • 964cup
    964cup Posts: 1,362
    I have:

    Four on bikes:
    Quarq on climbing bike
    Rotor LT on RP/all-purpose bike (Quarq on order); Rotor LT will go to TT bike when the Quarq arrives.
    P2Max on winter bike
    Rotor LT on holiday bike

    Two on shelves:
    Rival Stages (used to be on turbo bike, turbo bike stolen by wife, now use one of the main bikes on the turbo; hate turbo anyway - rather get wet outdoors)
    Powertap rear wheel (ancient, was on turbo bike before Rival)

    Did put the Rival chainset in the classifieds, but no-one bit. Obvs not posh enough for this crowd. Worked well, I thought, although I'm now a bit of convert to spider-based meters (faster response, power balance [kinda], better metrics).

    So the right number is somewhere between 5 and 7. Unless I put one on the track bike, in which case, moar.
  • jgsi
    jgsi Posts: 5,062
    Different tack... considering that power meters are still expensive, what is everyone's ROI for having 1 or multiple powermeters?
    Personally, having used one for training a good number of years, I really could go back old school and not exactly suffer in respect of race results next season.
    Are people actually winning stuff because of PMs?
  • 964cup
    964cup Posts: 1,362
    Far too old to win things, but:

    1. PMs stop you blowing up on climbs - can't count the number of times I've been dropped at the start of a climb, but been first (or at least definitely not last) by the end of it.
    2. PMs help you distinguish between perceived and real effort - means you don't (necessarily) cook yourself at the start of a ride when you feel strong and also help psychologically when your legs are telling you it's all too hard, but you're only doing 250w.
    3. All of the above with knobs on for TTs.
    4. I think it's more efficient to train with power than without. I hate the turbo, but I can't imagine doing it without power these days - I'd find it really hard to judge what results I was getting.

    I do spend a lot of my time riding fixed, though, with no PM and no other sensors (well, I do have a cadence sensor, but no display - it's just fun to look at later). I think some of the benefit of 1 & 2 above sticks, so perhaps I'm over-rating the value of PMs.
  • One, the right one, for you.

    If you're doing the winter/summer bike thing, just swap the crank arm or the pedals over when it's time. Then when good weather hits, swap back.

    If you get a nice weather day in winter for the summer bike, just ride it without for the day.

    Training wise? Just use a fluid or smart trainer and throw the bike on there that has the meter.

    Sooooo many people who claim to "train" without a meter or HRM and are essentially just doing endurance rides with a few segment efforts thrown in. That's my "off" day on a training plan with a meter.

    Perceived effort in the hands of us mere mortals is how you end up getting lazy on a ride. Or blow up in 10 minutes.

    Tell me you can go out and do an honest "over/under" interval workout with a HRM or with nothing at all.........ain't gonna happen.
  • reacher
    reacher Posts: 416
    I can and my guess is that their were plenty of cyclists doing so before power meters came along and plenty still manage without them, thats not to say their not a useful tool but to be fair you are making it sound like you cant train without one
  • Depends on your brand. Buy Garmin or Powertap pedals and they are easy to swap from bike to bike. Stages, Pioneer, 4iiii to a lesser degree if your bikes are all the same chainset. Unless you’re a pro or have a large disposable income, I would think buying an expensive power meter multiple times is a bit idiotic when there are options to allow you to not need to
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028

    Tell me you can go out and do an honest "over/under" interval workout with a HRM or with nothing at all.........ain't gonna happen.

    Have to agree with reacher. If you're experienced enough to know what your threshold 'feels like' then this is simply not an issue. Of course you can.

    That's not an argument against powermeters, btw.
  • FatTed
    FatTed Posts: 1,205
    okgo wrote:
    I have one per bike. So 3, all quarq, all adjusted to match each other

    How do you do that Okgo?
  • Alex99
    Alex99 Posts: 1,407
    ="Alex99"So, anyone can work out the best way to achieve that.
    What did you do?

    2 road bikes + various wheels. 2x Stages for me.
  • Alex99
    Alex99 Posts: 1,407
    JGSI wrote:
    Different tack... considering that power meters are still expensive, what is everyone's ROI for having 1 or multiple powermeters?
    Personally, having used one for training a good number of years, I really could go back old school and not exactly suffer in respect of race results next season.
    Are people actually winning stuff because of PMs?

    I don't think a good race performance can be pinned down to just one variable like this. A lot of people will certainly attest to a power meter helping them improve. Of course, it is possible to train well without a PM, but I definitely find that measurement helps. For me, seeing progress is motivating, and the PM data gives me that and is a factor in keeping up consistent training.
  • phil485
    phil485 Posts: 364
    Currently have 3, 2 stages and one powerful wheel. Turbo is a tacx neo so that probably counts as a 4th.

    Very interested to have a look at the new Shimano Power meter when it's readily available to replace one of the stages.

    Numbers are interesting!
  • daniel_b
    daniel_b Posts: 11,652
    I've gone two, BUT one is a proper power meter for out on the road, and one is part of a direct drive turbo, as above, a Neo in my case.
    Another one for the winter bike would be a nice to have, but prices need to drop more first.

    Having said that, when I start TT-ing, the job of swapping the Vector 2's across may wear thin at some point.
    Felt F70 05 (Turbo)
    Marin Palisades Trail 91 and 06
    Scott CR1 SL 12
    Cannondale Synapse Adventure 15 & 16 Di2
    Scott Foil 18
  • okgo
    okgo Posts: 4,368
    FatTed wrote:
    okgo wrote:
    I have one per bike. So 3, all quarq, all adjusted to match each other

    How do you do that Okgo?

    You can adjust the slope of them in Qalvin. I bought a calibration weight and went through the process with them to make sure of course.
    Blog on my first and now second season of proper riding/racing - www.firstseasonracing.com
  • FatTed
    FatTed Posts: 1,205
    So you can, thanks
  • EBEB
    EBEB Posts: 98
    1.5

    One real one (power 2 max) and an iBike Newton+.

    The advantage is
    1) combined you can get a live indication of your wind resistance
    2) with ‘powermatch’ you can see how long before you get tired and start pedalling square.
    3) if you can move the real power meter (once) between bikes you can calibrate the newton to work on up to 4 bikes - it is close enough when the weather isn’t terrible and you don’t accidentally go off road. The Newton is a simple swap. I think the more recent power pod is the same.

    I now have a power for each bike (and one spare) and live wind resistance for the TT bike.

    It is just a shame that they haven’t written a Connect IQ app, otherwise the powerpod would be an ideal second powermeter. The Newton computer itself doesn’t have a backlight, so sucks in the dark. It does however transmit ANT+ power.
  • penski
    penski Posts: 124
    I voted 1 but then realised the correct answer for me should be 2 - 1 on road bike, one with the turbo!
  • manxshred
    manxshred Posts: 295
    I had 2.5, Road, MTB and virtual power on my trainer. I'm now down to 1.5 due to getting a refund on the stages on my MTB due to it always breaking, and I'll not replace the stages on my road bike when the time comes, or sell it to a friend who is interested.
    It has brought me no benefit knowing my power numbers for the riding I do.