bike cleaning

shiznit76
shiznit76 Posts: 640
edited October 2017 in Road general
Hi, was in aldi there and saw they had a load of muc-off products in going cheap, got degreaser, lub, cleaner, but there was also an aerosol containing PTFE that it says to spray over bike (except wheels/brakes obviously) after you have cleaned your bike to supposedly help keep your bike clean and drive out moisture. Does anyone use this, or is it just a gimick?
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Comments

  • StillGoing
    StillGoing Posts: 5,211
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    That spray is basically a gimmick. If your bike is painted as in gloss, and you can be bothered, wax it with some car wax if you have some in the garage for a better result. You'll need naff all of it. It's a pretty pointless thing to do though.
  • Mr Sheen
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    Mr Sheen

    Yep, another good shout.

    Mr Sheen sprayed liberally onto a microfibre cloth is great for cleaning up bar tape too.

    Some bike specific products are basically sold because they can sell them, they're often nothing special.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    mfin wrote:
    Some bike specific products are basically sold because they can sell them, they're often nothing special.

    *most* ;)
  • philthy3 wrote:
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.

    I got this from a shop while looking for muc-off and found it much better. Still use it.

    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    Mr Sheen

    Yup. This.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • As I have a new Canyon I'm currently fussy about keeping it clean *. So, after a ride if it's dirty I wash it, dry it then use some top end car wax(from about 10 years ago when I had a decent motor) which is applied by hand to frame. Helps keep shite off, makes cleaning easier and smells fantastic!

    *Obviously as time goes on novelty will wear off.
  • mfin
    mfin Posts: 6,729
    As I have a new Canyon I'm currently fussy about keeping it clean *. So, after a ride if it's dirty I wash it, dry it then use some top end car wax(from about 10 years ago when I had a decent motor) which is applied by hand to frame. Helps keep shite off, makes cleaning easier and smells fantastic!

    *Obviously as time goes on novelty will wear off.

    There's no need to wax it that often even if you're inclined to, a couple of coats of wax will last months on a car in all sorts of conditions.

    It is just the same as if you waxed a car every time you washed it, nobody would do it, not because they couldn't be bothered to do wax it that often, but because there is no point. There's probably nothing for the wax to bond to once you've done it a few times either.
  • mfin wrote:
    As I have a new Canyon I'm currently fussy about keeping it clean *. So, after a ride if it's dirty I wash it, dry it then use some top end car wax(from about 10 years ago when I had a decent motor) which is applied by hand to frame. Helps keep shite off, makes cleaning easier and smells fantastic!

    *Obviously as time goes on novelty will wear off.

    There's no need to wax it that often even if you're inclined to, a couple of coats of wax will last months on a car in all sorts of conditions.

    It is just the same as if you waxed a car every time you washed it, nobody would do it, not because they couldn't be bothered to do wax it that often, but because there is no point. There's probably nothing for the wax to bond to once you've done it a few times either.

    Sorry, I should have been more specific. I do wash bike if dirty but certainly don't wax it every time it's washed.
  • step83
    step83 Posts: 4,170
    philthy3 wrote:
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.

    I got this from a shop while looking for muc-off and found it much better. Still use it.

    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!

    Baby wipes are great, I use some big multi surface ones seem to work well enough.

    WD is a water displacer, I prefer to user GT8s, its cheaper smells nicer an its got PTFE in so acts as a light lubricant.
  • Step83 wrote:
    philthy3 wrote:
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.

    I got this from a shop while looking for muc-off and found it much better. Still use it.

    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!

    Baby wipes are great, I use some big multi surface ones seem to work well enough.

    WD is a water displacer, I prefer to user GT8s, its cheaper smells nicer an its got PTFE in so acts as a light lubricant.

    It’s not WD40 lube, it’s their own line of bike cleaner. It’s better than much-off. Spray on, go have a shower, rinse off and wet wipe the rest.

    I’d not let the WD40 your thinking of anywhere near one of my bikes.

    https://wd40.co.uk/wd-40-bike/bike-cleaner/
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Assuming we're talking about the original WD40 (not the subsequent bike-specific range) then there's nothing wrong with it and no reason not to use it on a bike. It's just a light mineral oil in a carrier solvent, exactly like loads of other products which typically get categorised as 'maintenance sprays'..
  • Imposter wrote:
    Assuming we're talking about the original WD40 (not the subsequent bike-specific range) then there's nothing wrong with it and no reason not to use it on a bike. It's just a light mineral oil in a carrier solvent, exactly like loads of other products which typically get categorised as 'maintenance sprays'..

    Where exactly would you use it? It’s not a lube so not on a chain, not on seals, it’s not a cleaner and even then there are better products about. I wouldn’t even use it on my pedals to stop them squeaking. It’s not useless but I can think of better things to use it on my bike for maintenance.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Imposter wrote:
    Assuming we're talking about the original WD40 (not the subsequent bike-specific range) then there's nothing wrong with it and no reason not to use it on a bike. It's just a light mineral oil in a carrier solvent, exactly like loads of other products which typically get categorised as 'maintenance sprays'..

    Where exactly would you use it? It’s not a lube so not on a chain, not on seals, it’s not a cleaner and even then there are better products about. I wouldn’t even use it on my pedals to stop them squeaking. It’s not useless but I can think of better things to use it on my bike for maintenance.

    It is a lube - in as much as it is based on a light mineral oil, it is no more or less of a lube than any other maintenance spray. No reason not to use it on chains or seals either. I'm not claiming it is the most appropriate lube for any given situation, but those claiming it is not a lube and would not use it on their bikes should probably read the product data sheets first...
  • Wheelspinner
    Wheelspinner Posts: 6,591
    Step83 wrote:
    philthy3 wrote:
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.

    I got this from a shop while looking for muc-off and found it much better. Still use it.

    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!

    Baby wipes are great, I use some big multi surface ones seem to work well enough.

    ....
    No, they're not, please! I know they work just fine and make your life that teeny tiny bit easier by just using one and then.... chucking it away.

    This world is full enough of discarded, "disposable" cr@p that ends up in landfill. Even allegedly bio-degradable stuff can take ages to actually degrade.

    Just use a rag with your cleaning method of choice and when it gets too grubby, give it a wash and start over.
    Open One+ BMC TE29 Seven 622SL On One Scandal Cervelo RS
  • Step83 wrote:
    philthy3 wrote:
    I use WD40, cheaper. Have done since I was racing motorcycles around. It helps prevent flies and crud sticking to the paintwork etc and easier to wash them off.

    I got this from a shop while looking for muc-off and found it much better. Still use it.

    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!

    Baby wipes are great, I use some big multi surface ones seem to work well enough.

    ....
    No, they're not, please! I know they work just fine and make your life that teeny tiny bit easier by just using one and then.... chucking it away.

    This world is full enough of discarded, "disposable" cr@p that ends up in landfill. Even allegedly bio-degradable stuff can take ages to actually degrade.

    Just use a rag with your cleaning method of choice and when it gets too grubby, give it a wash and start over.

    Ones I use are made of paper. No less biodegradable than toilet paper or tissues.

    http://www.ageukincontinence.co.uk/andrex-classic-clean-flushable-wipes.html?utm_campaign=ShoppingFeed&utm_source=google&utm_medium=merchantcenter&utm_content=Health%20%3E%20Cleansing%20and%20hygiene%20%3E%20Wipes%20%3E%20Wet%20Wipes&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIi7eoytX41gIVBpPtCh041Qq7EAQYBCABEgKAA_D_BwE

    Excuse the website, it’s just the only one I could find a decent pic. Although I think it’s where Matthewfalle buys a lot of his stuff surprisingly!! :wink:
  • shiznit76
    shiznit76 Posts: 640
    Back on topic, would spraying GT85 over cleaned bike help keep it clean and also drive moisture out any areas that are still wet from the clean? Not using as a lube, just a barrier spray
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    shiznit76 wrote:
    Back on topic, would spraying GT85 over cleaned bike help keep it clean and also drive moisture out any areas that are still wet from the clean? Not using as a lube, just a barrier spray

    It would push the moisture out, and it would also leave a thin film of oil over all the other surfaces you sprayed it on, if that's what you want.

    You can also use it as a lube, because it is a lube.
  • Matthewfalle
    Matthewfalle Posts: 17,380
    After cleaning I spray things like mech screws with a tad of GT just to keep it all nice down the threads. Quick squirt on bolt heads as well. Takes 2 seconds.
    Postby team47b » Sun Jun 28, 2015 11:53 am

    De Sisti wrote:
    This is one of the silliest threads I've come across. :lol:

    Recognition at last Matthew, well done!, a justified honour :D
    smithy21 wrote:

    He's right you know.
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,491
    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!
    This world is full enough of discarded, "disposable" cr@p that ends up in landfill. Even allegedly bio-degradable stuff can take ages to actually degrade.
    Just use a rag with your cleaning method of choice and when it gets too grubby, give it a wash and start over.
    Ones I use are made of paper. No less biodegradable than toilet paper or tissues.
    I agree with Spinner. Most baby wipes are not biodegradable and cause all sorts of problems, especially when flushed down the loo.
    WD40 may well be mineral oil based, but so is petrol. It's too light to be any good as a lube on bicycle parts. GT85 is a little better, but not much.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Veronese68 wrote:
    WD40 may well be mineral oil based, but so is petrol. It's too light to be any good as a lube on bicycle parts. GT85 is a little better, but not much.

    Bicycles have lots of parts, so you can't say it's 'no good for bicycle parts' without being more specific. Offhand, I can't think of a 'bicycle part' that it wouldn't be suitable for. That's not to say that better lubes might be more appropriate in some cases.

    I used to use it as a chainlube on my old MX bikes back in the day, as did many others - worked very well with regular application.
  • debeli
    debeli Posts: 583
    I like to keep the drivetrain, brakes, cables and so on cleaning and loiked after.

    I pay very little attention to how clean the frame is. It gets a decent soapy wash when the wheels are off. Sometimes.

    I have noticed over the decades that a little mud and sort seem not to go.promise the utility or safety of a bicycle frame.

    When I do wash the non-oily parts, I use soapy water. I always have. It works pretty well and the finish is nice.

    I get the water from a standpipe in the garden and the detergent from a squirty bottle under the right-hand sink on the kitchen. Neither has ever run out. Ever.
  • debeli
    debeli Posts: 583
    I like to keep the drivetrain, brakes, cables and so on cleanish and looked after.

    I pay very little attention to how clean the frame is. It gets a decent soapy wash when the wheels are off. Sometimes.

    I have noticed over the decades that a little mud and dirt seem not to compromise the utility or safety of a bicycle frame.

    When I do wash the non-oily parts, I use soapy water. I always have. It works pretty well and the finish is nice.

    I get the water from a standpipe in the garden and the detergent from a squirty bottle under the right-hand sink in the kitchen. Neither has ever run out. Ever.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Debeli wrote:

    I get the water from a standpipe in the garden and the detergent from a squirty bottle under the right-hand sink in the kitchen. Neither has ever run out. Ever.

    Assuming your standpipe is on the mains supply, that probably explains why it hasn't 'run out'. The 'ever-lasting' bottle under the sink sounds fascinating though. Any pics?
  • I use warm water and car shampoo, degrease using Jizer, why pay more for over priced cycle specific branding. The use Mr Sheen which as well as giving a little shine it helps you clean the detail that you may otherwise miss and helps the muck come off more easily next time you wash it.
  • navrig2
    navrig2 Posts: 1,851
    Degreaser bought in bulk from Amazon. Water from the hose. Two brushes and an old sock. Morgan blue chain keeper.

    Take off the wheels and fit the Morgan blue.

    Spray down the frame with water.

    Spray the chain and cassette and derailleurs with degreaser (diluted and sprayed from a Wonder Wheels bottle which makes it foam).

    One brush is used to get into the nooks and crannies to rid of the crap stuck to the frame. Then rub it down with the sock (over my hand).

    The other brush is used to clean the cassette and chain. Usually they end up shiny clean.

    Spray down the wheels and the frame.

    Dry the chain and refit the wheels. Let the bike drip dry for a couple of hours then lube the chain and mechanics.
  • Veronese68 wrote:
    Oh and baby wipes. Lots of baby wipes!
    This world is full enough of discarded, "disposable" cr@p that ends up in landfill. Even allegedly bio-degradable stuff can take ages to actually degrade.
    Just use a rag with your cleaning method of choice and when it gets too grubby, give it a wash and start over.
    Ones I use are made of paper. No less biodegradable than toilet paper or tissues.
    I agree with Spinner. Most baby wipes are not biodegradable and cause all sorts of problems, especially when flushed down the loo.
    WD40 may well be mineral oil based, but so is petrol. It's too light to be any good as a lube on bicycle parts. GT85 is a little better, but not much.

    Yep, most are not, but the ones I use are, think I made that clear. They fall apart pretty quickly like kitchen roll does. Most are cotton based, they are bad but paper ones are fine.
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,491
    Yep, most are not, but the ones I use are, think I made that clear. They fall apart pretty quickly like kitchen roll does. Most are cotton based, they are bad but paper ones are fine.
    Yes, you did, that's why I left your bit in to show that there are some that are not so bad. Wasn't aimed at you.
  • shiznit76
    shiznit76 Posts: 640
    And is that what the muc ofd after wash spray does not es, basically leave a think film of oil on bike to help stop dirt sticking to it?