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Modify HR zones based on decreased MHR?

Chris.DChris.D Posts: 12
I began cycling regularly in Nov 2016 (previously untrained aerobically) and did several maxHR tests in early 2017 with a consistent result of 196 and an LTHR of 167 (British Cycling 30 min test) Fast forward to this month (July) and the repeated MaxHR tests show 190.

Through research and reading on this forum, my understanding is that MaxHR can decrease with fitness, which I will assume is what has occurred in my case. 2600 miles YTD including everything from various intervals to centuries.

My question is whether I should modify my HR zones based on my "new" maxHR, do another LTHR test, both? Zone 5 HR efforts are mainly what has been affected by the decrease, and I understand that using zone 5 HR is of little value compared to using power, but a PM is not in the cards at the moment.

Feedback and further education appreciated!

Posts

  • gethincerigethinceri Posts: 1,073
    Use LTHR
  • imposter2.0imposter2.0 Posts: 11,003
    As you say, HR in zone 5 won't really mean much anyway, so I wouldn't worry too much.
  • burnthesheepburnthesheep Posts: 675
    HR can be an extremely wonderful training tool, it works.

    I will say though, this kind of thing is why I ended up buying a power meter. I can make a plan for 12 weeks after a test and stick to the plan. Lots of things can affect HR at a training load or interval from day to day. The goal is to execute time at a load. Not time at a HR. Seeing a lower or higher HR on a day due to any array of reasons may cause many people to adjust the "load" or perceived effort incorrectly in response when in reality you probably shouldn't.
  • Chris.DChris.D Posts: 12
    Thank you for the responses.
    The goal is to execute time at a load. Not time at a HR. Seeing a lower or higher HR on a day due to any array of reasons may cause many people to adjust the "load" or perceived effort incorrectly in response when in reality you probably shouldn't.

    Funny you mention that. I've been very fortunate to mostly avoid this trap thanks to doing much research and reading early on in my "training". Understanding of the basic concepts of cardiac drift and training with power made it clearer: maintain the effort and let HR do what it will. Over time my gauge of RPE has improved. My first LTHR test started in the low 160's and ended in the high 170's, I believe if I'd backed off the effort, the result would have been skewed.
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