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Maybe we are not doomed after all

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  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 45,986
    Rolf F wrote:
    I would rather a larger house than a smaller one (up to a point). Wouldn't you?

    Missed this before! If our properties were the size of American ones then Leeds, Manchester, Wakefield, York, Halifax, Sheffield etc would have built over much of the Pennines. How much space do you need? I'd rather live in a small house and be able to visit the nearby countryside than live in a large house with no countryside.

    America has space to waste and, like everything it has to waste, it wastes it. We don't.
    Or maybe use rather than waste? If you have loads of space, why not use it?
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Rolf F wrote:
    I would rather a larger house than a smaller one (up to a point). Wouldn't you?

    Missed this before! If our properties were the size of American ones then Leeds, Manchester, Wakefield, York, Halifax, Sheffield etc would have built over much of the Pennines. How much space do you need? I'd rather live in a small house and be able to visit the nearby countryside than live in a large house with no countryside.

    America has space to waste and, like everything it has to waste, it wastes it. We don't.
    Or maybe use rather than waste? If you have loads of space, why not use it?

    Lots of reasons - eg as TimothyW said it just makes for much longer journeys to get anywhere. Or you have to build more amenities for fewer people; either way, unnecessary squandering of resources is needed. We don't need to presume only we own the land to waste either - it also belongs to the environment and excessive use of it is effectively theft. The great American lawn is pretty much a zero diversity habitat with no obvious purpose to it apart from looking censored (IMO!) and needing lots of maintenance/water so the less space used up by it the better!

    Ultimately, what is the point of bigger when you don't need it? (This statement will obviously fundamentally confuse any American who reads it)
    Faster than a tent.......
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    Confusing “need” with “want”.
    Different things.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 41,973
    Finally watching that programme about plastics...
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • pinnopinno Posts: 41,973
    laurentian wrote:

    It is. I don't know how countries outside of the EU can get pressured enough to change.

    I was shocked at this: It's a picture from the Thames estuary:

    plastic-kent.jpg?width=1368&height=912&fit=bounds&format=pjpg&auto=webp&quality=70
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,604
    A lot of the beach’s on the islands round Sky look like that or did a few years ago. Stuff thrown off ships and the like.
  • FocusZingFocusZing Posts: 4,380
    Drilling work is beginning at what may become the first deep geothermal power plant in the UK.
    Two wells will be drilled 2.8 miles (4.5km) and 1.5 miles (2.5km) into granite near Redruth, Cornwall, where the temperature is up to 200C (390F).
    Cold water will be pumped down to the hot rocks and then brought as heated water to the surface.
    Steam from the heated water will drive turbines producing electricity, perhaps enough for 3,000 homes.

    It is thought that the 2.8-mile deep hole, which will take seven months to finish, will be the deepest ever drilled in the UK.
    The heat-producing properties of the granite rocks under Cornwall mean the county is an obvious choice to exploit geothermal energy, say engineers behind the project.

    The £18m project has received £10.6m from the European Regional Development Fund, £2.4m from Cornwall Council and £5m from private investors.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-46100763

    Great idea 24/7 steam.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    FocusZing wrote:
    Drilling work is beginning at what may become the first deep geothermal power plant in the UK.
    Two wells will be drilled 2.8 miles (4.5km) and 1.5 miles (2.5km) into granite near Redruth, Cornwall, where the temperature is up to 200C (390F).
    Cold water will be pumped down to the hot rocks and then brought as heated water to the surface.
    Steam from the heated water will drive turbines producing electricity, perhaps enough for 3,000 homes.

    It is thought that the 2.8-mile deep hole, which will take seven months to finish, will be the deepest ever drilled in the UK.
    The heat-producing properties of the granite rocks under Cornwall mean the county is an obvious choice to exploit geothermal energy, say engineers behind the project.

    The £18m project has received £10.6m from the European Regional Development Fund, £2.4m from Cornwall Council and £5m from private investors.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-46100763

    Great idea 24/7 steam.
    When Brexiteers ask why we are still paying into Europe...
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    PBlakeney wrote:
    FocusZing wrote:
    Drilling work is beginning at what may become the first deep geothermal power plant in the UK.
    Two wells will be drilled 2.8 miles (4.5km) and 1.5 miles (2.5km) into granite near Redruth, Cornwall, where the temperature is up to 200C (390F).
    Cold water will be pumped down to the hot rocks and then brought as heated water to the surface.
    Steam from the heated water will drive turbines producing electricity, perhaps enough for 3,000 homes.

    It is thought that the 2.8-mile deep hole, which will take seven months to finish, will be the deepest ever drilled in the UK.
    The heat-producing properties of the granite rocks under Cornwall mean the county is an obvious choice to exploit geothermal energy, say engineers behind the project.

    The £18m project has received £10.6m from the European Regional Development Fund, £2.4m from Cornwall Council and £5m from private investors.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-46100763

    Great idea 24/7 steam.
    When Brexiteers ask why we are still paying into Europe...

    Does the EU generate money then? Pun not intended.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Does the EU generate money then? Pun not intended.
    A collective of income. It is not all from the UK.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Does the EU generate money then? Pun not intended.
    A collective of income. It is not all from the UK.

    Didn't say it was.
    They collect the money and give some back to the likes of this project. Because of the way you had highlighted the bit in bold, it suggested that the EU was acting as a benefactor, rather than just handing some of our money back.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    Ballysmate wrote:
    PBlakeney wrote:
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Does the EU generate money then? Pun not intended.
    A collective of income. It is not all from the UK.

    Didn't say it was.
    They collect the money and give some back to the likes of this project. Because of the way you had highlighted the bit in bold, it suggested that the EU was acting as a benefactor, rather than just handing some of our money back.
    In an effort to cut what could be a long debate short...
    Why are we still contributing? Because we are still collecting.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    I'm sure a Breiteer would say we should just cut out the middle man and keep our own money.
  • FocusZingFocusZing Posts: 4,380
    It was worth voting remain just to stop the bloody endless discussion and political waste of time. Imaging if that big house of commons effort was diverted to knitting warm wool jumpers, so the heating could be a couple of degrees lower.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,696
    Ballysmate wrote:
    I'm sure a Breiteer would say we should just cut out the middle man and keep our own money.

    Yes, let's have more tax cuts. Cornwall should stick to what it does best: Poldark and cream teas.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    Everyone had their reasons for voting the way they did, but for me, gratitude to the EU for spending some of our contribution in this country wasn't one of them.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,696
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Everyone had their reasons for voting the way they did, but for me, gratitude to the EU for spending some of our contribution in this country wasn't one of them.

    ..and I can have more tax cuts now?
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    Did you vote the way you did on the basis that you thought you would get a tax cut?
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,151
    Do we not already have a Brexit thread?
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • ballysmateballysmate Posts: 15,608
    I think someone must have bought Blakey a shoehorn.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    Blakey thought it was nice to see what could be accomplished if we work together. (On topic).
    Pity that's going to be blown out of the water. Move to the other thread. (Off topic).
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • robert88robert88 Posts: 2,696
    Ballysmate wrote:
    Did you vote the way you did on the basis that you thought you would get a tax cut?

    No but the way things are going I think I deserve one.

    On the upside, they have cancelled my UWO.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 41,973
    Looks like retailers are starting to wake up to plastics a little:

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/20 ... d-products

    But...

    viewtopic.php?f=40088&t=13099577&e=1&view=unread#p20444238
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • rjsterryrjsterry Posts: 20,151
    1985 Mercian King of Mercia - work in progress (Hah! Who am I kidding?)
    Pinnacle Monzonite

    Liberal metropolitan, remoaner, traitor, "sympathiser", etc.
  • pinnopinno Posts: 41,973
    On the news last night, Scotland produced 98% of it's electricity from renewable power this year.
    Who says that wind turbines don't work, are unsustainable, don't meet power demand fluctuations?!
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • I'd be interested to know how that was measured.

    On a purely averaged input-output basis over the year, probably. On a minute my minute basis, unlikely.
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 15,832
    I'd be interested to know how that was measured.

    On a purely averaged input-output basis over the year, probably. On a minute my minute basis, unlikely.
    I'd be assuming that hydro counts towards renewable.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    Veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • Stevo_666Stevo_666 Posts: 45,986
    Pinno wrote:
    On the news last night, Scotland produced 98% of it's electricity from renewable power this year.
    Who says that wind turbines don't work, are unsustainable, don't meet power demand fluctuations?!
    I'm guessing its not mainly solar power?
    "I spent most of my money on birds, booze and fast cars: the rest of it I just squandered." [George Best]
  • pinnopinno Posts: 41,973
    PBlakeney wrote:
    I'd be interested to know how that was measured.

    On a purely averaged input-output basis over the year, probably. On a minute my minute basis, unlikely.
    I'd be assuming that hydro counts towards renewable.

    I believe so.
    Stevo 666 wrote:
    Pinno wrote:
    On the news last night, Scotland produced 98% of it's electricity from renewable power this year.
    Who says that wind turbines don't work, are unsustainable, don't meet power demand fluctuations?!
    I'm guessing its not mainly solar power?

    Your contribution is always valued.
    I'd be interested to know how that was measured.

    On a purely averaged input-output basis over the year, probably. On a minute my minute basis, unlikely.

    Probably but even so, it's positive in a world of negative.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
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