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  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Huismans wrote:
    It was a short story compilation of Steven King's horror stories. Perfect for the October Months! Forgot the name of it as Ic can't find it right now, but it was a compilation of a lot of his older ones from the 80's to early 90's, rather than a lot of his newer ones.

    Was it The Bachman Books? That's some of his earlier stuff. I remember reading that when I was avidly devouring everything he'd ever written.

    Now halfway through the second book in the trilogy that starts with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Can't help but think a decent sub editor could whittle these books down to a couple of hundred pages each; quite a lot of inconsequential filler in them.

    I think my favourite author is Iain Banks, with and without the M. Contemporary fiction and science fiction. He does keep it short and to the point, and includes plot twists I rarely anticipate (or did, he's sadly no longer with us :( )
  • meursault
    meursault Posts: 1,433
    keef66 wrote:
    Huismans wrote:
    It was a short story compilation of Steven King's horror stories. Perfect for the October Months! Forgot the name of it as Ic can't find it right now, but it was a compilation of a lot of his older ones from the 80's to early 90's, rather than a lot of his newer ones.

    Was it The Bachman Books? That's some of his earlier stuff. I remember reading that when I was avidly devouring everything he'd ever written.

    Now halfway through the second book in the trilogy that starts with The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Can't help but think a decent sub editor could whittle these books down to a couple of hundred pages each; quite a lot of inconsequential filler in them.

    I think my favourite author is Iain Banks, with and without the M. Contemporary fiction and science fiction. He does keep it short and to the point, and includes plot twists I rarely anticipate (or did, he's sadly no longer with us :( )

    Agree about GwtDT, Liked the first one gave up half way through the second one. Author invented characters out of nowhere to keep the plot going.

    Iain Banks, also agree, top top author.
    Superstition sets the whole world in flames; philosophy quenches them.

    Voltaire
  • izza
    izza Posts: 1,561
    Failed English Literature O level and to be honest haven't improved since then.

    http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/id/ ... GwodMC4MMw
  • crispybug2
    crispybug2 Posts: 2,915
    Animal Farm by George Orwell.

    My favourite book ever, I always return to it and read it every few years or so, it never disappoints.
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    Pirates y Pants - A Welsh book about a band of cut throat pirates in search of the ultimate treasure - The Golden Pants!

    I won't spoil the ending
  • verylonglegs
    verylonglegs Posts: 3,954
    India After Gandhi by Ramachandra Guha.

    A lengthy detailed read that is well worth it if your knowledge of how India came to be how it is now after independence needs expanding upon.
  • finchy
    finchy Posts: 6,686
    Currently awaiting this one:

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    This week I have mainly been reading a guide to Hungarian grammar:

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  • redjeepǃ
    redjeepǃ Posts: 531
    I'm currently about half way through three books.

    The Rough Guide to the Blues.

    Great summary of the history of the blues from very early days through to (almost) current day.

    The Affair (Jack Reacher)

    I've read most of the series and each time I open it it, it reminds me why Tom Cruise really isn't a viable Jack Reacher (and why I won't be watching the new film).

    The Black Swan (Nassim Talib).

    A very interesting conversation about high highly improbable events can have a big impact on our lives.
  • Recently finished "Stoner" by John Williams. The life of an American farm boy who goes to college and eventually teaches there with all its trials and tribulations. Reflective, poignant and occasionally wryly witty. Terrific.
    Ecrasez l’infame
  • verylonglegs
    verylonglegs Posts: 3,954
    Recently finished "Stoner" by John Williams. The life of an American farm boy who goes to college and eventually teaches there with all its trials and tribulations. Reflective, poignant and occasionally wryly witty. Terrific.

    Agreed, read it earlier this year..very enjoyable.
  • courtmed
    courtmed Posts: 164
    Just finished The Accidental Universe by Alan Lightman. It's a series of essays that look at the universe from seven different viewpoints: the point of view of its origin, its evanescence, the spiritual dimension, symmetry, size, the laws of nature etc. Really, really good if that's of interest to you. All pretty easy to understand as well.
  • mr_goo
    mr_goo Posts: 3,770
    The Longest Kill by Sgt Craig Harrison

    An easy to read autobiography of the world record holding sniper who killed two Taliban fighters from 2707 yards, that's 1.5 miles.
    What saddened me was the last couple of chapters where the mental trauma of conflict (PTSD) catches up with him.
    Always be yourself, unless you can be Aaron Rodgers....Then always be Aaron Rodgers.
  • Tashman
    Tashman Posts: 3,400
    Mr Goo wrote:
    The Longest Kill by Sgt Craig Harrison

    What saddened me was the last couple of chapters where the mental trauma of conflict (PTSD) catches up with him.
    It's horrific. I know 2 people personally who suffer, 1 from the Falklands, 1 from Iraq/Balkans. I'm riding for Combat Stress as well as BHF next year when i take part in the London - Brighton for that reason
  • mr_goo
    mr_goo Posts: 3,770
    Tashman wrote:
    Mr Goo wrote:
    The Longest Kill by Sgt Craig Harrison

    What saddened me was the last couple of chapters where the mental trauma of conflict (PTSD) catches up with him.
    It's horrific. I know 2 people personally who suffer, 1 from the Falklands, 1 from Iraq/Balkans. I'm riding for Combat Stress as well as BHF next year when i take part in the London - Brighton for that reason

    A worthy cause sir.
    Always be yourself, unless you can be Aaron Rodgers....Then always be Aaron Rodgers.
  • secretsam
    secretsam Posts: 5,098
    Redjeep! wrote:
    The Affair (Jack Reacher)

    I've read most of the series and each time I open it it, it reminds me why Tom Cruise really isn't a viable Jack Reacher (and why I won't be watching the new film).

    Tom Cruise is a c0ckwomble. And FFS, Reacher is meant to be 6'5". Cruise is 5'7" in heels.

    Don't suppose Lee Child is complaining, though. Too busy counting his money...

    It's just a hill. Get over it.
  • Tashman
    Tashman Posts: 3,400
    Mr Goo wrote:
    Tashman wrote:
    Mr Goo wrote:
    The Longest Kill by Sgt Craig Harrison

    What saddened me was the last couple of chapters where the mental trauma of conflict (PTSD) catches up with him.
    It's horrific. I know 2 people personally who suffer, 1 from the Falklands, 1 from Iraq/Balkans. I'm riding for Combat Stress as well as BHF next year when i take part in the London - Brighton for that reason

    A worthy cause sir.
    Thank you
  • mr_goo
    mr_goo Posts: 3,770
    SecretSam wrote:
    Redjeep! wrote:
    The Affair (Jack Reacher)

    I've read most of the series and each time I open it it, it reminds me why Tom Cruise really isn't a viable Jack Reacher (and why I won't be watching the new film).

    Tom Cruise is a c0ckwomble. And FFS, Reacher is meant to be 6'5". Cruise is 5'7" in heels.

    Don't suppose Lee Child is complaining, though. Too busy counting his money...


    The Hollywood actor that should have portrayed Reacher is Vince Vaughn.
    Always be yourself, unless you can be Aaron Rodgers....Then always be Aaron Rodgers.
  • [quote="

    The Hollywood actor that should have portrayed Reacher is Vince Vaughn.[/quote]

    Terrible actor, actively pro-guns, anti-welfare and Trump supporter.
  • My last read....Orphan X by Gregg Horwitz...good read...but VERY like the Bourne series..and Reacher...in the films?
    That role was TAILOR made for Liam Neeson or Christian Bale, like the previous said...Tom is a dwarf!! Reacher is 6ft 5...surely Lee Child should have said something??!!!
  • Ben6899
    Ben6899 Posts: 9,686
    Currently halfway through David Walsh's "Seven Deadly Sins" - very good.

    And my current sci-fi fix is "The Divine Invasion" by PK Dick; the second in the VALIS trilogy. The third installment, "The Transmigration of Timothy Archer", awaits after this.

    Any other PK Dick fans?
    Ben

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  • meursault
    meursault Posts: 1,433
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    Not bad introduction to existentialism, bit too light for my taste, even gossipy in places. The author also doesn't understand Marxism.

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    read this a few times now never gets old. Johnson is a master.

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    This one inbetween other reads, as finding it a bit slow going.

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    Just started this and highly recommended. It's one of those experimental novel within a novel type things.
    Superstition sets the whole world in flames; philosophy quenches them.

    Voltaire
  • Kingsley Amis - Ending Up
    Five old people tied to a house with various infirmities etc. Each has their own way of dealing with it, mainly involving tormenting the others. Darkly funny, and in several places laugh out loud.
    Massive fan of K Amis' work, and this is among the best.

    Thanks for reminding me, I read that probably twenty years ago and really enjoyed it, as you say one of his darker books. Also a big fan of KA, Lucky Jim and Take a girl like you and the anti death league were among my favourites.
  • Starship troopers by R.Heinlein

    Was a good read no doubt, but it wasn't what I was expecting if i'm being honest.

    I was expecting something even MORE politically overt and dystopian than what it was. Sure, it builds a picture of that environment via dialogue between Rico and his old school teacher but it could do with a smidge more 'world building/setting' for my own tastes. A large chunk of it read just like an action book if im being honest, I think I need to read it again to get the full value out of it. It WAS written in 1959 but it's no doubt still a classic which I will recommend.

    If you like the first 1/2 of the movie Full Metal Jacket then you will love Starship troopers. It is not like the movie either but they did take snippets out of it.
    Anyway, ive moved onto to A Brave New World by A.Huxley.
  • Reading lots of history lately. Re-read Piers Brendan's history of the 30s "the Dark Valley". Excellent. Particularly enjoyed the caricatures of the leading personae. Also a history of National Service by Richard Vinen. Lots of detail for the completists, but again the stories from conscripts sent to Korea, Malaya etc are what makes it. And "Kursk" by Lloyd Clark. Again, loads of detail, which for a former tank crewman like me is ace, but the personal stories are great. And some are hair raising.
    Now re-reading Sherlock Holmes short stories and the Pickwick Papers. It's a Christmas holiday thing, I like to start a new book in the New Year.
    Ecrasez l’infame
  • mrb123
    mrb123 Posts: 4,608
    Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Amazing person, incredible story.
  • crispybug2
    crispybug2 Posts: 2,915
    My last read....Orphan X by Gregg Horwitz...good read...but VERY like the Bourne series..and Reacher...in the films?
    That role was TAILOR made for Liam Neeson or Christian Bale, like the previous said...Tom is a dwarf!! Reacher is 6ft 5...surely Lee Child should have said something??!!!


    Just finished it myself, thought it was bog standard and ordinary, no more no less
  • keef66
    keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Well I just forced my way to the end of the second of the Millenium trilogy, the first being The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. Lots of unneccessary waffle / filler with a couple of twists and a bit of excitement near the end. Not sure I have the fortitude to wade into the third one which is even fatter...

    Santa (wifey) got me a Kindle Paperwhite which is a bit of a novelty, so I'm busy lining up some potential purchases. It's dangerously easy with the old one click ordering on Amazon :shock:
  • When the professor got stuck in the snow - Dan Rhodes

    It's basically a massive mickey take out of Richard Dawkins. Very light but funny and worth a read

    Best book I have read in the last year is: I am Pilgrim by Terry Hayes -HIGHLY recommended, action thriller, not my usual sort of book but i couldn't put it down. Same for the Mrs and it's definitely not her sort of book.
    GET WHEEZY - WALNUT LUNG RACING TEAM™
  • My last three books follow a theme:

    Triumphs and Turbulence - Chris Boardman
    Riding through the dark - David Millar
    The World of Cycling according to G - Geraint Thomas

    All good in their own way, David Millar's was the best if a little self-indulgent maybe at times.

    Just finished G so not sure whether to continue on a cycling theme with My Time (Wiggo) or move to The Ascent of Money by Niall Ferguson?
  • narbs
    narbs Posts: 593
    As he died this week it seems like a suitable time to re-read John Berger's Ways of Seeing.

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