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Leg ache when climbing seated

louman999louman999 Posts: 90
When I go up hills I try to stay seated for as long as possible. However I soon get a burning pain coming from my quads. At first I thought it was natural and ignored it but despite doing a lot more hills I still get this problem and hills never get easier. When I climb out of the saddle I don't get this burning pain in my quads. Also of note I keep a high cadence around 90rpm when seated.

Posts

  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,828
    :shock:
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Saddle too low or too far forward could be the culprit.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • apreadingapreading Posts: 4,533
    Grill wrote:
    Saddle too low or too far forward could be the culprit.

    +1000
  • Grill wrote:
    Saddle too low or too far forward could be the culprit.
    Had a look at my saddle and it is all the way forwards so I think that might be the problem.
  • As you only get the burning pain when seated sounds like it could be saddle height as suggested. As well as saddle too low, quad pain can also be a result of saddle too high.

    One other possibility could be that you are going above your lactate threshold on climbs. As you are going at 90rpm sounds like you are working quite hard (probably more likely to be your position though).
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,828
    my legs always burn going up hill at 90 revs, my lungs don't feel too clever either.
  • Webboo wrote:
    my legs always burn going up hill at 90 revs, my lungs don't feel too clever either.

    Have you tried smaller gears?
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • webboowebboo Posts: 3,828
    I've tried lots of gears, currently I have 22 to choose from.
  • craigus89craigus89 Posts: 887
    How long have you been cycling? Without knowing more info it's hard to say but it could just be a lack of general fitness or 'bike fitness'.
  • kajjalkajjal Posts: 3,380
    For saddle fore / aft position use KOPS as a starting point and adjust as needed.

    For the saddle height you want to be stable on the saddle without rocking and stretching to reach the pedals. To get it about right you need to put the pedal down with the crank arm in line with the seat tube. There should be a slight bend in the leg at the knee and you should be able to lift yourself a little off the saddle in line with the seat post. It does vary a little with different peoples flexibility, proportions etc. Clear signs it is too high are feet pointing down to reach the pedals at the bottom, rocking on the saddle as you over stretch down to reach the pedals etc.

    Just take your time and after a few adjustments and rides it should be about spot on.
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