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Bike equipment - gps, heart rate monitor, etc

javidrjavidr Posts: 107
edited October 2016 in Road beginners
Hi

I have finally bought a road bike and i would like to start fitting useful items on it ;)

The first thing i want to fit is a GPS with navigation, not sure what is the technical name.

What i want is the gps to guide me on a route that i have previously loaded in.

I would also need a heart rate monitor. Here is where the main concern comes... compatibility. I have read a lot of problems with monitors not compatible with the gps

Last thing is speed and cadence sensor. Cadence is a must, and i assume the gps will be compatible with it. Regarding speed sensor, do i need it, or will the gps itself have the ability to calculate the speed?

Thanks!
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Posts

  • Garmin 820 does everything that you want

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/garmin-edge-820-bundle/
    Road - '10 Giant Defy 3.5
    MTB - '05 Scott Yecora
    BMX - '04 Haro Nyquist R24 (don't judge me)
  • javidrjavidr Posts: 107
    Garmin 820 does everything that you want

    http://www.wiggle.co.uk/garmin-edge-820-bundle/

    This little thing is almost as expensive as the bike! i was looking for something cheaper
  • If you want an integrated GPS, Navigation, HRM, Speed & Cadence sensor then you're going to have to spend some money I'm afraid!
    Road - '10 Giant Defy 3.5
    MTB - '05 Scott Yecora
    BMX - '04 Haro Nyquist R24 (don't judge me)
  • grenwgrenw Posts: 785
    Garmin is the usual brand recommended for a GPS computer. The 820 is the brand new model of what you're looking for. My wife has the older 810 model and uses it just as you describe.

    Look for ANT+ connecting devices for HRM straps and speed/cadence sensors. I use a Wahoo strap and Garmins own speed/cadence sensor but only really on the turbo. Check any review and they'll no doubt mention if it is compatible with the Garmin - the advantage of buying a GPS from the market leaders.
  • javidrjavidr Posts: 107
    what about garmin 200? It can be connected to the speed and cadence sensor, it syncs to the heart monitor and you can also load a route there, isnt it?
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,368
    javidr wrote:
    what about garmin 200? It can be connected to the speed and cadence sensor, it syncs to the heart monitor and you can also load a route there, isnt it?
    I don't think it can, courses yes the rest no, maybe try the Edge 25.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    diamonddog wrote:
    javidr wrote:
    what about garmin 200? It can be connected to the speed and cadence sensor, it syncs to the heart monitor and you can also load a route there, isnt it?
    I don't think it can, courses yes the rest no, maybe try the Edge 25.
    The Garmin 200 is fine for average speed, distance etc. but it does not sync with HR monitor or cadence sensor nor has SatNav. You are going to have to do without the SatNav unless you are prepared to spend a lot.

    A Garmin 500, or the 510/520 later models, usually comes with cadence sensor and HR monitor and is a very good device, but does not have proper SatNav.
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
    I got the Garmin 25 for £79 from ALDI. It was good but I never tried loading courses on.it. I got a Wahoo cadence sensor which worked ok with it. After.I.replaced the new battery it came with that was flat. It lasted about 3 weeks then failed to connect to the GPS. I'm very wary of Wahoo now.

    The Garmin 25 has also become temperamental. It has an issue with the top right button that doesn't always work. Once turned on.you need three presses of the button to get going. It works with the first and third. The second press doesn't always work. It also freezes then just suddenly turns off losing your ride which only saves at the end.

    IMHO avoid Garmin 25 but if you get it and lucky such that It's reliable for you then it's a good GPS. Connects to ant+ and Bluetooth sensors as well. Scocche rhythm arm based optical hrm is a good one to get. IIRC Bluetooth and ant+ connection too,
  • Well, I'm planning on getting a garmin 25 (it can be loaded with your route and then a breadcrumb route to ride so it says...)... and the wahoo cadence sensor too, as it is no magnet device (just stick on the crank or your shoe).
    Heart rate will be a Mio Link, as it's a wrist worn device rather than a chest strap. (No need for extra speed sensor as that seems to be for indoors use only)
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
    That's what I got apart from the mio. The Garmin 25 has lasted a month or so then is seriously playing up. The Wahoo sensor you're getting lasted two weeks. It came with a flat battery, no big deal but pi$$ed me off a bit. It then just failed. New battery I got a day.longer out of it before it died completely. Should have sent it back.

    Seriously I'd look to get a Garmin sensor to go with the GPS.

    I've read up a bit on optical.hrm. DCRainmaker seems to rate Scocche wrist strap a lot. The mio is one he rates but I got the impression he got dodgy results at times with some mio hrm.
  • bflkbflk Posts: 240
    That's what I got apart from the mio. The Garmin 25 has lasted a month or so then is seriously playing up. The Wahoo sensor you're getting lasted two weeks. It came with a flat battery, no big deal but pi$$ed me off a bit. It then just failed. New battery I got a day.longer out of it before it died completely. Should have sent it back.

    Seriously I'd look to get a Garmin sensor to go with the GPS.

    I've read up a bit on optical.hrm. DCRainmaker seems to rate Scocche wrist strap a lot. The mio is one he rates but I got the impression he got dodgy results at times with some mio hrm.

    I ditched my Garmin 200 (and optional Polar HRM) in favour of a TomTom watch with optical HRM and find it better and less hassle and also I don't keep trying to push up my average speed as its not in my face all the time. You can add a cadence sensor but not bothered with it. The only time I also mount the Garmin is if I want to follow a breadcrumb trail course.

    Only negative is that the hrm sensor is a bit flaky sometimes. It uses the Mio sensor.
  • javidrjavidr Posts: 107
    Thanks guys

    Being a starter, i am not ready to spend that huge amount of money, so the list is reduced to garmin 25 or garmin 200 (if this provides breadcrumb navigation)
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,368
    The 25 will do all you asked about but you need to buy compatible heart rate monitor and cadence/speed sensors to fulfil your requirements.
  • Buy an Edge 705 if you don't want to spend as much, they're still very good and do everything you want. Mine is still going strong.
  • ravey1981ravey1981 Posts: 1,111
    if you can find an edge 500 it will do everything you need and is compatible with ANT+ HR, speed and cadence sensors. Used mine for years and regularly load courses up to it when i'm riding in unfamiliar areas (it did fantastic in Tenerife earlier this year). I've toyed with the idea of upgrading but in reality it does everything I need, I like to ride rather than look at pretty pictures and stuff when i'm on the bike.
  • javidrjavidr Posts: 107
    I have seen an offer in garmin 25. It is £125 with garmin hrm

    Garmin 500 (or 520) is £180 without hrm, so it would be £205

    Does it worth to spend £80 extra in having a nicer display and the gradient, which i believe are the main differences? Probably not....
  • pblakeneypblakeney Posts: 12,727
    javidr wrote:
    I have seen an offer in garmin 25. It is £125 with garmin hrm

    Garmin 500 (or 520) is £180 without hrm, so it would be £205

    Does it worth to spend £80 extra in having a nicer display and the gradient, which i believe are the main differences? Probably not....
    The Garmin 25 will not display heart rate on the same screen as cadence, or any other data, as heart rate has it's own dedicated display. This factor alone forced me to get a 520.
    The above may be fact, or fiction, I may be serious, I may be jesting.
    I am not sure. You have no chance.
    veronese68 wrote:
    PB is the most sensible person on here.
  • The Garmin 520 is about the minimum you're going to want to be going for. Other than that if you're on a tight budget then get a cheap non-GPS computer for your stem instead.
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
    Check out ALDI they might have the 25 for £79 then you buy any chest strap that does ant+ or Bluetooth. Cheaper option. Can buy direct online too AFAIK.

    It's not showing online but my store still has at least the one in the cabinet. If you go for the 25 unit check your local ALDI out first.
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
    Polar do some interesting cycle computers too. I think their hr monitoring is better too with fitness tests built in.
  • javidr wrote:
    I have seen an offer in garmin 25. It is £125 with garmin hrm

    Garmin 500 (or 520) is £180 without hrm, so it would be £205

    Does it worth to spend £80 extra in having a nicer display and the gradient, which i believe are the main differences? Probably not....

    If you actually want to use it for navigation, you want turn by turn - and that is far from perfect. The really small Garmins really aren't intended for this purpose.
  • You really don't need a speed or cadence sensor. You'll get a good enough speed reading on the GPS. Cadence? Go find a Watt bike and then get a feel for each speed aim for about 90+ on the flattish bits. Hills you'll work out yourself.
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    You really don't need a speed or cadence sensor. You'll get a good enough speed reading on the GPS. Cadence? Go find a Watt bike and then get a feel for each speed aim for about 90+ on the flattish bits. Hills you'll work out yourself.
    If you want to look at cadence, it's good to get a cadence sensor, as you can then see it when you are cycling rather than on a Watt bike.
  • StillGoingStillGoing Posts: 5,207
    The Garmin 520 is about the minimum you're going to want to be going for. Other than that if you're on a tight budget then get a cheap non-GPS computer for your stem instead.

    What? A second hand 705, 800, 500 and 510 will do what the OP wants without spending 520 money.
    I ride a bike. Doesn't make me green or a tree hugger. I drive a car too.
  • tangled_metaltangled_metal Posts: 3,996
    I got a cadence sensor, a Wahoo one which failed after less that a month. Not going to replace because I kind of got the feel for cadence. I can see the benefit of using a bike with out for a while to get the feel then no longer need it. Whether that's a borrowed sensor or a gym's bike with one.
  • Have a look at Polar- They have their own bike series. I have a m400 atm for running and general watch wear. They are excellent and excellent customer service.
    They have their m800 granted its a tri watch but it looks lush. They have cadence pedals also.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    Do you own a smartphone? You can get countless apps for navigating. I cheap but sturdy stem mount for a phone can be found at wiggle or similar. If you are only starting out I am sure you are not doing massive distances which are going to drain your battery.
  • fenixfenix Posts: 5,437
    You really don't need the stuff you want. Don't bother with a gps - we managed for decades without. Go ride your bike. Explore. Get lost a bit. You'll be fine.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    fenix wrote:
    You really don't need the stuff you want. Don't bother with a gps - we managed for decades without. Go ride your bike. Explore. Get lost a bit. You'll be fine.

    Actually this . Sometimes getting lost means you finds better routes.
  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 28,799
    I got a garmin 1000 performance bundle from Ribble 4 weeks ago...paid approx £315 with sale discount codes and free postage....Very impressed although it takes a while to set up routings and preferences etc
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